What to Read to Fill the Void Left by Your Favorite TV Shows This Summer

As one television season comes to its inevitable end, and a number of our favorite shows have either finished for the summer (or for good) we’ve compiled a suggested reading list of books to binge on and fill the void of your favorite shows while we wait impatiently for them to return next season. Readers and television bingers alike, don’t forget to leave your suggestions in the comments. … Read More

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Staff Picks: Flavorwire’s Favorite Cultural Things This Week

Need a great book to read, album to listen to, or TV show to get hooked on? The Flavorwire team is here to help: in this weekly feature, our editorial staffers each recommend the cultural object or experience they’ve enjoyed the most in the past seven days. Click through for our picks, and tell us what you’ve been loving in the comments. … Read More

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Surreal Photos of Women Dressed in Books, Butterflies, and Paper Planes

These stunning photographs by the LA-based fine art photographer Brooke Shaden (spotted via Faith is Torment) depict moody landscapes, harking back to the Gothic romanticism of surreal paintings. In her words, Shaden is “creating new worlds through [her] photographs,” and indeed her photos suggest something otherworldly; they conjure a warped kind of down-the-rabbit-hole experience of the world. Perhaps most compelling in these photographs are the costumes Shaden’s subjects wear, made of unconventional materials — from paper planes and flowers to actual books (and, in one, flesh) — which are reminiscent of the fashion exhibited in the Met’s 2011 Alexander McQueen retrospective, Savage Beauty. Take a look through the strange, beautiful images below.

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‘Camera Obscura’: Incredible Photographs of Indoor Cityscapes

In his 1978 novel Invisible Cities, Italo Calvino wrote, “The city…does not tell its past but contains it like the lines of a hand, written in the corners of the street, the gratings of the windows, the banisters of the steps, the antennae of the lightning rods, the poles of the flags, every segment marked in turn with scratches, indentations, scrolls.” In Abelardo Morell‘s photography series, Camera Obscura (via Faith is Torment), every crevice of the interior space is infused with the city. The artist created his series by photographing outdoor cityscapes from Times Square to the Brooklyn Bridge and then projecting these images, with a small lens or prism, onto the walls of rooms. Morell has observed that an “increased sense of reality” lends itself to the photos, though perhaps it’s more the unreality of these images, and how the interior, when interposed with the exterior, begins to take on new meanings. We might regard these rooms as invisible cities in themselves, containing everything and nothing.

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43 Great Tina Fey Quotes for Her 43rd Birthday

One of Flavorwire’s favorite people, Tina Fey, turns 43 years old today, so we’re marking the occasion in the best way we know how — by rounding up some of the funniest witticisms and best advice from the brilliant and funny writer/comedienne. We’ve got one for every year, so click through for her thoughts on working motherhood, celebrity, homophobia, strip clubs, and Mark Wahlberg’s… Read More

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The Most Uncomfortable Portrayals of Celebrities in Art [NSFW]

Celebrities are voracious connoisseurs of art (even Beyoncé loves art history), and are among the few people in this world who can actually afford to collect it, so it makes sense that celebrities often appear as the subjects of artworks. Of course, that’s not to say they always inspire flattering portraits. The recent $1.9 million sale of artist John Currin’s 1991 nude portrait of Golden Girl Bea Arthur has inspired Flavorwire to round up the most awkward portrayals of celebrities in art, from politicians in the buff and doused in urine to installation art, sculpture, and a certain former president’s wet and wild self-portrait. … Read More

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Mapping the ‘The Office’s’ Slow Decline

For the dedicated fans of The Office who haven’t been offended/ disappointed/ heartbroken enough by its gradual decline over the seasons to abandon it entirely, tonight’s series finale may be its biggest disappointment yet. For all the show’s flaws, the Dunder Mifflin employees have indeed become something like family — not just among themselves, but to those committed viewers who have stuck with the gang through the good times and the very bad ones. Now that it’s time to bid the show goodbye, here’s our guide to the show’s steady descent, in a series of moments that made The Office really start to suck balls. (That’s what she said.) … Read More

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Multiple Exposure Photographs Inspired by Impressionist Paintings

Influenced by the Impressionist aesthetic of Monet and Turner’s work, these gorgeous multiple exposure photos by the artist Eeva Karhu (via Faith is Torment) possess the evocative quality of painting. Indeed, they look more like paintings than they do photos; note the grainy, hazy texture of Kahru’s photos and the way the light blurs the landscape within each frame. Her work doesn’t just emulate the Impressionist masters, however — it straddles that liminal space between mediums and worlds. In fact, Kahru’s portraits seem more like imagined renderings than real ones, but of course they are real. These pictures remind us that there’s something innately beautiful and painterly in our surroundings. … Read More

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Staff Picks: Flavorwire’s Favorite Cultural Things This Week

Need a great book to read, album to listen to, or TV show to get hooked on? The Flavorwire team is here to help: in this weekly feature, our editorial staffers each recommend the cultural object or experience they’ve enjoyed the most in the past seven days. Click through for our picks, and tell us what you’ve been loving in the comments. … Read More

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Blueprints of Light: Illuminated 3D Perspective Drawings

This stunning installation by the London art collective United Visual Artists (UVA) uses light to create 3D constructs, repurposing space in innovative and compelling ways. With the aptly titled Vanishing Point, spotted at Architizer, UVA re-imagines and restructures the 2D designs of Renaissance architects, using laser beams to manifest 3D perspective environments that register as spectacular blueprints of light, revising architectural conventions and making art out of planning. Take a look at photographs of the installation, currently on exhibit at Berlin’s Olympus Photography Playground, below. … Read More

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