bailey

Jason Bailey

Film Editor

Jason Bailey is a graduate of the Cultural Reporting and Criticism program at New York University’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute. His first book, Pulp Fiction:The Complete Story of Quentin Tarantino’s Masterpiece, was published last fall by Voyageur Press. His writing has also appeared at The Atlantic, Slate, Salon, and The Village Voice, among others. He lives in New York with his wife Rebekah, his daughter Lucy, and their two cats.

Features

Flavorwire’s Guide to Indie Movies You Need to See in August

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With the summer movie season winding down, we’re seeing more and more of what’s usually dubbed “counter-programming” — both at the multiplex and on indie screens. Our dozen recommendations for the later are, as usual, an eclectic bunch: personality documentaries, B-movie homages, relationship comedy/dramas, and some of the best roles for women we’ve seen this year.
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Five Movies In, The ‘Mission: Impossible’ Series Finds Its Style

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Perhaps the most interesting thing about Mission: Impossible—  Rogue Nation, the latest inventively punctuated installment in Tom Cruise’s spy series, is that Mission: Impossible has actually become a franchise, almost in spite of itself. What began as yet another ‘90s film adaptation of a classic television show (as any film historian can tell you, these were the superhero movies of their era, in terms of “fuggit, sure, do another one” ubiquity) initially positioned itself as less a connected narrative than a spy anthology series, with each film sporting a new director and a totally different aesthetic. But sneakily, over the past couple of entries, a new element has emerged: consistency. And in the process, M:I has become one of our more reliably entertaining film series.
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“They Captured The Man, The Person I Knew”: Marlon Brando’s Daughter on the Extraordinary Documentary ‘Listen to Me Marlon’

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The profile documentary has, over the past few years, become so chained to its tiresome tropes (the mournful talking heads, the done-to-death clips, the ponderously fill-in-the-blanks narration) that a stylistic backlash was probably inevitable. At least, that’s the only explanation I can conjure up for how 2015 has given us three profile docs that are not only structurally innovative, but uncommonly personal—telling the stories of groundbreaking artists in their own words, via materials not yet in the public sphere.
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