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Judy Berman

Editor-in-Chief

Judy Berman is Flavorwire's editor-in-chief. Her work has appeared in publications including the LA Times, Slate, The Atlantic, and The Believer. Before joining Flavorwire, she was an editor at Salon. She lives in Gowanus, the most wonderful neighborhood in all of Brooklyn.

Features

From Nietzsche to Lynch: A Selection of Truly Highbrow Moments From ‘Clueless’

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If you’re about 30 years old, like I am, chances are your lifelong romance with Clueless probably began with a mall multiplex, some spilled popcorn, and weeks of quoting such catchphrases as “whatever” and “as if.” But you probably didn’t quite realize — I certainly didn’t, at least — until years later that Amy Heckerling packed her movie full of cultural references of all kinds. There are even plenty of highbrow shoutouts in Clueless. Here’s a selection of favorites, from Nietzsche to Lynch. …Read More

Is ‘Skins’ Creator Bryan Elsley’s New Series the Great Dating Show American TV Needs?

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Romantic comedy was everywhere on television during the 2014-15 season, from the heartening successes (You’re the Worst) to the miserable failures (Marry Me) to the promising shows that struggled to find an audience (RIP Selfie). But some of the best recent examples of the genre have come from British TV; in the past few months, the charming series Catastrophe and Scrotal Recall have reached US viewers thanks to Amazon and Netflix (respectively). Tonight, The CW will premiere yet another romance-focused UK import, Skins creator Bryan Elsley’s half-hour drama Dates.
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25 Essential Punk Rock Movies

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Penelope Spheeris’ legendary The Decline of Western Civilization trilogy finally saw home video release this week — and, in case you hadn’t noticed, everyone at Flavorwire is pretty excited about that. So, to celebrate their reemergence, we’ve rounded up 25 essential punk movies, from arthouse oddities to awesomely cheesy exploitation flicks to groundbreaking nonfiction …Read More

Dreamy Paintings of Cities, Mountains, and Waves Seen Through an Airplane Window

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The world looks strikingly — and beautifully different — through the window of an airplane flying thousands of feet above it. The artist Jim Darling captures the wonder of seeing places we thought we knew from this angle, in a series of paintings where gorgeous aerial views of cities, bodies of water, mountains, and plains are framed within those distinctive windows.
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‘The Astronaut Wives Club’ Isn’t the Great New Period Drama ‘Mad Men’ Fans Are Waiting For

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The Astronaut Wives Club, premiering Thursday night on ABC, is the kind of TV show that is impossible to watch without starting to guess at how it was pitched. Mad Men meets Desperate HousewivesMasters of Sex, starring the Stepford Wives? Pan Am, but farther off the ground? Unfortunately, it isn’t just the past several years’ vogue for TV dramas set in the mid-20th century that prompts this inquiry — it’s also the fact that the series is a jumble of obligatory themes and half-baked characterizations cribbed from other shows to form something that feels simultaneously overstuffed and underwritten.
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Intimate Photo Portraits of Hollywood Boulevard’s Street Characters

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If you’re walking down Hollywood Boulevard and find yourself face to face with Marilyn Monroe or Darth Vader, that’s not just the magic of the movies — or the heat of Los Angeles — getting to you. Plenty of flesh-and-blood people haunt that artery dressed up as legendary stars and iconic characters, posing for photos with tourists and living off their tips. Copenhagen-based photographer Ken Hermann was fascinated by these performers, who, he writes, “are — or once were — pursuing the American dream of becoming someone special and famous. And, it is this struggle mixed with the childish fantasy world I find interesting.” Hermann captures this emotional complexity in Hollywood Street Characters, his beautifully composed series of portraits. Click through for a few highlights, and visit Hermann’s Behance page or website to learn more about his work.
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Revisiting Gaspar Noé’s ‘Irréversible’ Amid TV’s Rape Wars

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Last month, a Game of Thrones episode titled “Unbowed, Unbent, Unbroken” ended with a scene that caused some controversy: Ramsay Bolton raped Sansa Stark on their wedding night, forcing Theon Greyjoy to watch. It was a painful moment, not because it was particularly graphic — after Ramsay ripped Sansa’s dress and pushed her onto the bed, the camera cut away to Theon’s contorted face — but because of what we already know about each character. Ramsay is a sadist, someone who delights in rape and torture and murder, a man who’s been getting away with atrocities for too long. And Theon’s betrayal of the Starks, in many senses, is what put Sansa in such a vulnerable position.
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