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Judy Berman

Editor-in-Chief

Judy Berman is Flavorwire's editor-in-chief. Her work has appeared in publications including the LA Times, Slate, The Atlantic, and The Believer. Before joining Flavorwire, she was an editor at Salon. She lives in Gowanus, the most wonderful neighborhood in all of Brooklyn.

Features

Gloria Steinem, Madeleine Albright, and the Conversation Feminists Should Really Be Having About Hillary and Bernie

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I had to watch the video twice, and even then it was hard to believe what I was seeing. Gloria Steinem, arguably America’s most consistent public voice for feminism since the 1960s, was trying to explain to Bill Maher why so many young women support Bernie Sanders over Hillary Clinton. “When you’re young,” she said, “you’re thinking, ‘Where are the boys? The boys are with Bernie?’”
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Gloria Steinem Tells Bill Maher Young Women Support Sanders Because “The Boys Are With Bernie”

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Gloria Steinem appeared on HBO’s Real Time With Bill Maher last night for a one-on-one interview with the host to promote her new book, My Life on the Road. And midway through what turned out to be a mostly measured, ten-minute conversation between the 81-year-old feminist icon and a comedian whose track record on women’s issues has always been spotty at best, Maher asked Steinem why she thought so many young women were supporting Bernie Sanders over Hillary Clinton in the Democratic primary.
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The Unfortunate Impossibility of Keeping Emotions Out of Elections

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The months after both major parties’ conventions may be the most intense time of the election cycle, but in my experience, it’s the primaries that are most emotional. It’s when the narcissism of (often, not always) small differences between candidates erupts into binary stereotypes that make everyone involved look petty, and when people who used to think they agreed with one another begin to see their points of divergence as irreconcilable conflicts.
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We Always Knew Who David Bowie Really Was

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It’s strange the way we mourn in fragments now, not just performing our grief on social media, but mining our memory banks for the thing we know about the famous person who died that others might not remember. Unattractive yet forgivably human tendencies to make someone else’s tragedy about us aside, there is a certain logic to celebrating David Bowie, in particular, this way: his was a life full of phases, references, rarities, detours, anomalies, unbelievable-yet-somehow-true stories, and footnotes.
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Which 2015 Book Should You Read While Your Favorite TV Show Is on Hiatus?

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The holidays are upon us, and unless you really love spending time with your family, you’re probably in need of a distraction. Especially since that greatest of contemporary cultural distractions — television — will be a wasteland of reruns and ’80s Christmas movies until January, why not pick up a new book that touches on the same themes as your favorite on-hiatus show?
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2015: The Year an “Orgy of Specificity” Revitalized Romance

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A few pages into my favorite love story of 2015, Maggie Nelson’s theory-propelled memoir The Argonauts, the author “lies lovesick on the floor” while her friend searches Google for clues as to the “preferred pronoun” of Harry, Nelson’s new lover. Maggie and Harry are already deep into a sexual relationship at this point, “spending every free minute in bed together.” Later that day (though earlier in the book, in its very first paragraph), Nelson recounts, “[T]he words I love you come tumbling out of my mouth in an incantation the first time you fuck me in the ass.” The author has now both slept with and fallen in love with a person without knowing their gender.
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