Tom Hawking

Deputy Editor

Tom Hawking is Flavorwire's Deputy Editor. He's from Australia, has lived in NYC for five years, and once edited India's biggest music magazine. His work has appeared in the New York Times, the Guardian, Rolling Stone, VICE, the NME, the Quietus and various other outlets. He likes hearing new music, watching basketball, and sleeping. He lives in Brooklyn with an irascible cat named Kathleen Hanna.

Features

Bernie Sanders vs. Barack Obama: A Hypothetical Basketball Pick-Up Game

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Almost lost in the news of Bernie Sanders’ victory in New Hampshire last night was the footage Fox News showed of his basketball skills. As the votes came in, Sanders was nailing a succession of bank shots in a gym with his family. His apparent prowess calls to mind our current president, and the question of who’d win in a pick-up game between incumbent and aspirant.
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What Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton’s “Progressive” Debate Reveals About the Erosion of Meaning in Political Language

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The apparently endless episodes of the Republican debate sideshow have commanded the media’s attention ever since the 2016 presidential campaign began, but perhaps the most interesting exchange in any of the candidates’ debates came last week, when Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders argued over the meaning of the word “progressive.” Like a lot of terms that we use in the context of politics, “progressive” is one of those words that, intuitively at least, seems to have a clear meaning — but once you start trying to nail that meaning down, you realize that it’s slippery at best and nonexistent at worst.
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The Enemy of My Enemy: Megyn Kelly Standing Up to Donald Trump Is No Act of Heroism

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The aphorism “The enemy of my enemy is my friend” is as old as time itself — or nearly, anyway. According to our good friend Wikipedia, its first recorded use was in a Sanskrit tome on statecraft from the 4th century BC, which means we’ve at least 2,500 years of political cynicism preceding the election campaign in which we’re currently embroiled. As far as political expediency goes, though, that particular nugget of wisdom is one that’s best regarded with suspicion — as the ongoing pitched battle between the camps of Donald Trump and Fox News demonstrates nicely.
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Could We Handle ‘Labyrinth’ in 2016?

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It’s already been lost in the outrage cycle, but over the weekend, the Internet went bonkers briefly over a “report” that the Jim Henson Company was making a rebooted version of the 1986 film Labyrinth. It turned out that the company is doing no such thing, and then Kristen Stewart either did or didn’t say something stupid, and the Internet got mad about that, and Labyrinth was forgotten. But if you’ll indulge us for a second, it’s interesting to think about how the film might go over if it was released, or remade, today.
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The Return of ‘The X-Files’: Surprisingly Perfect for a New Century of Paranoia

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“I’m familiar with Edward Snowden,” observes Fox Mulder acidly during the second episode of the resurrected X-Files, in response to a nameless governmental apparatchik reminding him of the consequences of revealing things he’s not supposed to. It’s a knowing nod-and-wink to the fact that this is The X-Files in the 21st century, but also an acknowledgment of the fundamental question with this whole exercise: in a world that’s already overflowing with conspiracy theories, and one in which our government really is spying on us, why do we need The X-Files?
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I’m Still Finding Myself in David Bowie’s ‘Low’

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Everybody has a David Bowie moment, so here is mine. The first Bowie album I bought was Hunky Dory, but the one I always read most about in the music magazines I used to thumb through at the newsstand where I delivered newspapers was Low. I didn’t get it until years later — not until the end of my 20s, which is, coincidentally enough, the age at which its creator made it. And I was genuinely startled to find that it seemed to describe… me.
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Why Does the American Left Want to Blame Itself for Donald Trump?

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One of the more pernicious narratives that’s arisen around the continuing success of Donald Trump of late is that, somehow, it’s all the left’s fault. Over the past couple of months, there’s been a steady stream of articles arguing that Trump only emerged as a serious presidential candidate (as in, a presidential candidate with a serious chance of being elected) because liberals these days are just so damn PC and sensitive about everything.
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