Tom Hawking

Deputy Editor

Tom Hawking is Flavorwire's Deputy Editor. He's from Australia, has lived in NYC for five years, and once edited India's biggest music magazine. His work has appeared in the New York Times, the Guardian, Rolling Stone, VICE, the NME, the Quietus and various other outlets. He likes hearing new music, watching basketball, and sleeping. He lives in Brooklyn with an irascible cat named Kathleen Hanna.

Features

The Flavorwire Podcast: Viva La Tomlinaissance!

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The Flavorwire podcast returns after an unscheduled break due to your host being, um, well, unable to speak. Respiratory infections are the worst! But we’re back, and we’re discussing Taylor Swift’s parade of prominent female BFFs, the highest paid actors in Hollywood and on TV, and why we hope everyone is enjoying the Tomlinaissance as much as we are. Click through to listen, download and/or subscribe!
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The Only Good Binary Is an Exploded Binary

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There’s been a ruffling of feathers in England over the results of a recent British survey, which asked a bunch of respondents to plot their sexuality somewhere along the Kinsey scale. Less than half the respondents — 46%, to be precise — between the ages of 18 and 24 defined themselves as exclusively heterosexual, leading to hand-wringing headlines proclaiming that “1 in 2 young Britons say they aren’t heterosexual.”
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Spotify’s New Privacy Policy: Music’s Not the Product, You Are

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In June 2013, Flavorwire ran a piece about Spotify, written in the wake of Thom Yorke’s condemnation of the service for not paying enough money to up-and-coming artists. At the time, we noted that the service was losing money, and that its business model appeared unsustainable, and wondered how it was planning to survive long-term. Two years later, Spotify is still losing money, and its business model appears to remain unsustainable, but perhaps the answer to the question of ensuring its long-term profitability is becoming clear — or, at least, the company’s strategy for doing so is becoming clear. Whether said strategy will work seems questionable, at best.
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Why Even ‘The New York Times’ Can’t Agree On Its Amazon Exposé

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Unless you’ve been hiding very adroitly, you’ve probably come across last week’s New York Times cover story, written by Jodi Kantor and David Streitfeld, which revealed the results of an in-depth investigation into the workplace practices at Amazon and drew some pretty disturbing conclusions. You may, however, have missed the follow-up from the paper’s Public Editor, Margaret Sullivan, which questioned the original report. Taken together, the two pieces provide a neat summation of the debate around Amazon’s culture, and the implications that debate has for our society as a whole.
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In Defense of Uncomfortable Subject Matter in Genre Fiction

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Last week, The New Statesman ran an essay by Liz Lutgendorff, wherein she describes reading every book on NPR’s reader-selected list of the top 100 science fiction and fantasy books, and finding them to be “shockingly offensive” in their “continued and pervasive sexism.” In the course of proposing “a Bechdel test for books,” Lutgendorff launches broadsides at a variety of authors, some of whose work is indeed genuinely awful (step forward, Piers Anthony), and questions why these works remain so respected.
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