Books

Literary T-Shirts for Last-Minute Holiday (or Treat-Yourself) Gifts

I’m obsessed with literary T-shirts because they’re my version of band T-shirts — exactly the kind of geeky, nerdy, not-quite-hipster item that fits my personality. I won’t mention how many I own. And a Jane Eyre T-shirt was my most treasured MFA graduation present. So, in the spirit of the season, I thought I’d honor night seven of Hanukkah and the penultimate eve before Christmas Eve by sharing a few perfect literary T-shirts to purchase for yourself or a loved one before the year ends. … Read More

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How ‘Unbroken’s’ Laura Hillenbrand Writes Her Epic Nonfiction

Laura Hillenbrand has written two nonfiction books: Seabiscuit: An American Legend and Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption. Each is a major work, and they’ve sold ten million copies between them; they’ve also both been turned into movies, the latter serving as the basis of this year’s Angelia Jolie-directed Oscar-bait. I wrote earlier this year that Hillenbrand is the greatest nonfiction writer working today, and I stand by that assessment. … Read More

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Flavorwire Staffers’ Favorite Books of 2014

We’ve already published our official lists of the best novels, poetry books, and nonfiction books of 2014. Not everything that stuck with Flavorwire’s writers made it onto those lists, though — which is why we’ve collected our personal favorite reads of the year for your perusal. From Hollywood histories to graphic memoirs, here’s what the Flavorwire staff couldn’t put down in the last 12 months. … Read More

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10 Fictional Assassinations of Real People

Honestly, I have no idea why two fictional assassinations of real people are causing controversy at the same time. First it was author Hilary Mantel’s short story “The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher” (see below). Next, as you probably know, The Interview — about the fictional assassination of Kim Jong-un — drew the ire of some hackers somewhere, and the result has been a maelstrom of insanity and AutoCorrect the likes of which Hollywood has never seen. … Read More

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In Praise of Fact-checking

The media has been making plenty of apologies lately, for articles that caused a splash and, just as quickly, were exposed as fraudulent. First, it was Rolling Stone‘s exposé about rape on college campuses, and now it’s New York Magazine’s tiny feature on the 17-year-old Stuyvesant High School student who claimed to have made $72 million in the stock market. Turns out the kid made it all up. … Read More

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J.K. Rowling: There Was a Jewish Wizard at Hogwarts

Hanukkah happened at Hogwarts, according a fan Q+A on Twitter with J.K. Rowling last night. Rowling introduced us to Anthony Goldstein,… Read More

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Poison, Pubes and Pubs: Links You Need To See

Poison–readily available in traditional domestic settings and requiring little brute force to use effectively–has long been considered a woman’s weapon. While most poisonings are committed by men–only 39.5 percent are committed by the fairer sex–if a woman kills, she’s most likely to have used poison as her method. At The Hairpin, Meredith Haggerty wrote a piece detailing some of history’s most famous–and horrifying–female poisoners, including Lucrezia Borgia (who was said to possess a ring filled with poison that she’d use at parties), pictured above. … Read More

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