Books

In Praise of J.K. Rowling’s Post ‘Harry Potter’ Career: Messy, Fun and Badass

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For years in between Harry Potter installments, J.K. Rowling kept so much under wraps. She exerted tight control over the biggest literary juggernaut of our time, managing it with fierce pride, down to the last nondisclosure agreement.

After that final book was released and the hype slowly died down, however, we’ve really gotten to know Jo Rowling, beyond the archetypal origin story of the single mom on government assistance. It turns out she is everything we could hope for in a  world famous author-cum-celebrity.
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‘The End of the Tour': The David Foster Wallace Rom Com

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One thing you don’t have to say about The End of the Tour, the new David Foster Wallace movie, is that “it’s not really about David Foster Wallace at all.” Of course it isn’t. There are too many buffers between Wallace and this film to count. Nor is the film any good, as A.O. Scott tried to tell you yesterday. Scott claimed that as a film about writers, Tour “is as good as it gets.” It isn’t. You might even say the film is worse than good: it is bad.
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Flavorwire Exclusive: An Excerpt From ‘Adventure Time: The Original Cartoon Title Cards Vol. 2′

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In Adventure Time, one of the most visually stunning shows on television, the animation invites viewers in to a surreal, beautiful world that celebrates the wonders of adolescence without ignoring the darker, more complicated side of growing up. The show’s visuals add to its emotional complexity, beginning with each episode’s hand-painted title card, which references the upcoming story.
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The 2015 Man Booker Longlist Breakdown

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The Man Booker Prize has announced a 2015 longlist featuring 13 novels by authors representing seven nations. The standing list for the £50,000 prize was pared from a selection of 156 books by a panel of five judges, including Ellah Wakatama Allfrey, John Burnside, Sam Leith and Frances Osborne. The shortlist will be announced on Tuesday, September 15th, and the winner of the prize will be made public in a broadcast by the BBC on October 13th.
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Read an Excerpt from ‘Nagasaki: Life After Nuclear War”

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Released in concert with the 70th anniversary of the bombings of Nagasaki and Hiroshima, Nagasaki: Life After Nuclear War by Susan Southard follows in the footsteps of John Hersey’s Hiroshima, providing a harrowing account that begins on the morning of the bombing and extends to the present day. Southard’s approach is devastating yet necessary, and, as Ian Buruma said in the New York Times, it gives us “some idea of what it must have been like for people who were unlucky enough not to be killed instantly.” The below account, taken from the second chapter of Southard’s book, tells of the first moments when the bomb struck the small port city, killing 74,000. — Jonathon Sturgeon
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Is this Really the Golden Age of Publishing? Ask Eddie Redmayne’s Brother

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According to Charlie Redmayne, HarperCollins UK CEO and half-brother of Eddie, the book business has entered its Golden Age. He said as much earlier this month at a garden party for writers and publishers on a “glorious summer’s evening” in London. Publishing Perspectives quotes Redmayne, who was previously the CEO of Harry Potter fansite Pottermore, exhorting his guests to hold their heads high. “I genuinely believe publishing is entering a golden age,” he exclaimed. “There are more people reading than ever.”
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In Search of Lost Memory: Jesse Ball’s Elegiac ‘A Cure for Suicide’

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What if memory behaves like an immune system? Let’s say, for the sake of a thought experiment, that our memory acts as a time-mind barrier, swelling around our psychic wounds, expanding or contracting in reaction to external stimuli. It might be possible, on that basis, to tear down our memories and rebuild them in much the same way that modern medicine razes the immune system in order to make way for alien stem cells.
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