Books

James Franco Stars As Another Poet In ‘The Color of Time’ Trailer

The world, apparently, has not yet gotten its fill of James Franco. The actor/artist/short story writer is starring in the… Read More

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Watch Carey Mulligan as Bathsheba Everdene in ‘Far From The Madding Crowd’ Trailer

Carey Mulligan has kept a low profile since Baz Luhrman’s 2013 The Great Gatsby, in which she starred as the… Read More

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The Short Stories Behind 10 Famous Films

We’ve been anticipating the audiobook release of John McManusStop Breakin Down — the short story collection that won him a prestigious Whiting Writers’ Award, for which he was the youngest recipient. “Here is rage on the page,” the Los Angeles Times wrote of McManus’ stories about “people driven to the brink of endurance and survival.” Writer Dane Elcar narrates the audio version, imbuing the tales with a cinematic quality. The release got us thinking about the ways literature is translated from page to screen and the many short stories that have made the leap to cinema. Here are ten of our favorites for your comparison and perusal. … Read More

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The Wolfen Book Covers of Jack London

“He was sounding the deeps of his nature, and of the parts of his nature that were deeper than he, going back into the womb of Time,” wrote Jack London in his 1903 classic novel The Call of the Wild. The story centers on a dog named Buck who is sold off and shipped to the Klondike to be trained as a sled dog. The harsh conditions and treatment ignite his primitive, wolflike ways — and he becomes the story’s mythical hero. London’s 1906 novel White Fang finds a wolfdog on the journey to domesticity. The author’s experiences as a “hobo,” sailor, and journalist took him to faraway places — many which become the settings for his stories. “It was in the Klondike I found myself,” he wrote while reflecting on his days in the Yukon Territory. London always had a penchant for dogs and animals, and his cold-weather travels found him surrounded by them. The wolves and dogs of London’s stories made their way to the covers of his books, which we’ve collected in memory of the author. … Read More

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The 50 Best Independent Fiction and Poetry Books of 2014

2014 will go down as a landmark year in independent literature, chiefly because a few longstanding “trends” or “developments” are hardening into verifiable traits of fiction and poetry beyond Big Publishing. Independent poetry, in the works of such writers as Claudia Rankine and Andrew Durbin, is becoming more sophisticated in the way it encroaches upon other forms of visual and literary art. In fiction, a greater tendency toward autofictional novels of emotional maturation — typically in a cruel world — is colliding with the arriving generation’s faith in the bending of genres. The increasing confidence these writers have in their forms is beginning to show in the way they assert themselves against an older generation, sure, but it’s also showing up in the quality of the books. Plainly put: line for line, stanza for stanza, independent writing, and therefore independent publishing, is better than it was just a few years… Read More

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Searching for Clues — and Closure — in Ian Curtis’ and Kurt Cobain’s Handwritten Archives

Ian Curtis wrote in all caps, often with a Sharpie. When he wanted to change a word in his lyrics or notes, he’d scratch out his former word choice utterly completely — as if he wanted to erase it from existence. In a lot of ways, the Joy Division leader’s handwriting seems to reflect his personality: “Ian was a very definite person,” says Jon Savage, the co-editor of So This Is Permanence, a collection of Curtis’ notebooks released last month by Chronicle Books. “If he didn’t like something, he would eventually make his displeasure shown. He was a Cancer.” … Read More

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Meghan Daum’s ‘The Unspeakable’ Is a Harrowing Tale of Generation X Growing Up

Some essayists, perhaps because you share demographics like age and background, end up occupying oddly intimate places in your life. Meghan Daum — the original New Yorker-approved, essayist voice of Generation X — is one of them. She’s felt like a big sister ever since I found a copy of My Misspent Youth, her 2001 essay collection, at a bookstore. My Misspent Youth was the announcement of a bright new voice in nonfiction, and Daum was able to look tough topics in the eye — the lies of a literary life in New York, her staggering amount of debt, what it’s like when a friend dies at too young of an age. She was warm and realistic and not afraid to seem like an asshole. … Read More

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Author Daniel Handler Apologizes For Racist Jokes, Donating (and Matching) $10K Plus to Nonprofit We Need Diverse Books

After Wednesday’s National Book Awards Ceremony was marred by author and emcee Daniel Handler’s racist jokes, the writer and artist,… Read More

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Watch the Badass Ursula K. LeGuin NBA Speech That People Are Calling “Show-Stealing” and “Prophetic”

“We live in capitalism. Its power seems inescapable. So did the divine right of kings,” Ursula K. LeGuin … Read More

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Relax: EDM Is Getting Its Comprehensive History Book

Michaelangelo Matos, the best-named music journalist of all time, is writing the first comprehensive book about electronic dance music… Read More

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