Books

Bokonon Lives: Vonnegut’s ‘Cat’s Cradle’ Coming to TV

It was zah-ma-ki-bo. Cat’s Cradle — Kurt Vonnegut’s anti-religion, anti-war, anti-everything masterpiece centered around a bogus-but-believable religion called Bokononism — is… Read More

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“Patriarchy Is Neither Universal Nor Inevitable”: Gloria Steinem on Paula Gunn Allen’s ‘The Sacred Hoop’

Feminist writer and activist Gloria Steinem has launched a book review series: “Reading Our Way to the Revolution: Each Month, a Timeless and Timely Book.” This month, Flavorwire is pleased to host Steinem’s review of The Sacred Hoop: Recovering the Feminine in American Indian Traditions by Paula Gunn Allen. … Read More

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Jon Stewart Interviews Judith Miller, and It’s Painful to Watch

Former investigative reporter for The New York Times and current commentator for Fox News Judith Miller just experienced another painful… Read More

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Ellen DeGeneres Is Bringing an Expensive, Animated ‘Green Eggs and Ham’ to Netflix

Sam-I-Am and the best-selling children’s book by Dr. Seuss — Green Eggs and Ham — are coming to Netflix as a… Read More

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More than 30 Authors, Including Junot Díaz and Lorrie Moore, Sign Letter in Protest of PEN Award to Charlie Hebdo

Today New York Magazine reports that an email signed by more than 30 writers was sent to PEN on… Read More

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Does ‘Charlie Hebdo’ Deserve PEN’s Freedom of Expression Courage Award? A Conversation

Earlier this week, six authors — Teju Cole, Rachel Kushner, Michael Ondaatje, Francine Prose, Peter Carey, and Taiye Selasi — announced their withdrawal as literary hosts of this year’s PEN America gala, over the group’s acknowledgment of Charlie Hebdo with its annual Freedom of Expression Courage Award. Responding to what Kushner referred to as the magazine’s “cultural intolerance,” the writers met with quick condemnation from both PEN itself and one of its loudest spokesmen, Salman Rushdie.

So, who’s right? Is the Charlie Hebdo staff’s martyrdom enough to justify honoring them? Or should an award like this be reserved for work that PEN and its constituency actually endorse? Flavorwire Editor-at-Large Sarah Seltzer and Literary Editor Jonathon Sturgeon found themselves on the opposite sides of these questions. Below, each argues their point of view. … Read More

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Courtney Love’s Ghostwriter Files Lawsuit Over Unpublished Memoir

Courtney Love’s ghostwriter, Anthony Bozza, wants to get paid for delivering a finished, 123,375 word manuscript (which Love ultimately rejected)… Read More

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Flavorwire Exclusive: Civilization Is Doomed! McKenzie Wark Takes on the Anthropocene

In the below excerpt, drawn from the conclusion of his energizing new book Molecular Red, McKenzie Wark confesses that “we all know this civilization can’t last.” Nevertheless! Wark asserts that our imaginations are up to the standard of describing a new and better world, and so he sets out to consider what metaphors we might use to define a future that will “undo the workings of the Anthropocene.” The industriousness and intellectual range you see here defines Molecular Red, a brilliant and persistently entertaining book that considers everything from cyborgs to Russian intellectuals and Kim Stanley Robinson’s Mars trilogy. … Read More

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Mahatma Gandhi, Baltimore, and the Myth of Nonviolence

It’s like clockwork. There’s a riot in some disenfranchised corner of America — or, more likely, there’s a peaceful protest that turns violent on its fringes. The media beams back images of burning shopfronts and crying children. A man in a uniform appears on television, appealing for calm. There’s a whole lot of hand-wringing about the futility of violence, and then somebody posts something on Facebook about “Ghandi” [sic] — usually, “An eye for an eye makes the whole world blind,” pasted onto a nice sharable photo. There’s a long, pious conversation about how nonviolent protest is the only acceptable means of resistance in a civilized society, all involving people who have never known someone like Freddie Gray, and who have never lived in the same circumstances as the average resident of a Baltimore housing project. People like, y’know, me. … Read More

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Jonathan Littell’s ‘Syrian Notebooks’ Is a Devastating Dispatch From the Most Dangerous Country for Journalists

Jonathan Littell’s Syrian Notebooks: Inside the Homs Uprising, translated from the French by Charlotte Mandell, is one of those rare books that elaborates its value on every page. An account of revolutionary activity in Syria from three years ago, recorded over three weeks, the book, according to Littell, is “a document, not a work of literature.” It is likely both of these things, but it is more importantly a book that has escaped Syria — for three years the most dangerous country in the world for journalists — and therefore something of a (harrowing) wonder. Any country where journalists die at such a rate — at least 17 foreign journalists were killed there in 2014 — is by definition one we struggle to understand. And, as Patrick Cockburn has recently noted, the deficit of completed books from Syria, in addition to periodic reportage, means that we likely don’t understand the conflict in any robust sense. … Read More

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