Books

Beautiful and Playful Bookcase Staircase Designs

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There’s something irresistible about an attractive bookcase and staircase combination. We love getting lost in a good book, so perhaps it’s the idea that a staircase can physically transport us to a different place the way a book can in our mind. These shelf/stair hybrids from designers and architects recently caught our eye — and like all things bookish, we had to share the best of the best with you.
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Dorothy Parker’s Best Bon Mots on Writing

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Dorothy Parker was born on August 22 in 1893, so it’s her birthday this weekend! As a critic and famed member of the Algonquin round table, Parker  is remembered for her acid wit, those critical and epigrammatic barbs that were constructed so well as to be almost poetic.
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Are Grown-Up Coloring Books the Future of Publishing?

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I was never capable of the precision required by childhood’s frequent forays into organized arts and crafts. My personal style was much too messy, so my many artistic endeavors were more of the sketch-and-doodle variety; I often colored outside the lines, literally and figuratively (indeed, coloring outside the lines was my favorite metaphor in my teenage diaries).
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Read an Excerpt From Lucia Berlin’s ‘A Manual for Cleaning Women’

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“Perhaps, with the present collection” Lydia Davis writes in the introduction to A Manual for Cleaning Women, “Lucia Berlin will begin to gain the attention she deserves.” The attention Berlin deserves is the attention afforded to our best writers of short fiction — there is no doubt she should be engraved on the the metaphorical Rushmore of short story writers, alongside Yates or Carver or whoever else you’d like to put there.
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In Defense of Uncomfortable Subject Matter in Genre Fiction

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Last week, The New Statesman ran an essay by Liz Lutgendorff, wherein she describes reading every book on NPR’s reader-selected list of the top 100 science fiction and fantasy books, and finding them to be “shockingly offensive” in their “continued and pervasive sexism.” In the course of proposing “a Bechdel test for books,” Lutgendorff launches broadsides at a variety of authors, some of whose work is indeed genuinely awful (step forward, Piers Anthony), and questions why these works remain so respected.
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