Books

Sex, Death, and Understanding in Paul Lisicky’s ‘The Narrow Door’

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Everybody loves an origin story: the loss that fueled Joni Mitchell, for instance, or the difficulties with Gauguin that led to Van Gogh’s undoing. We love to see story of the mud and blood that come together to sculpt the artists we read and idolize. Those stories appear briefly in Paul Lisicky’s new memoir The Narrow Door, but the book tells a story that is in its own fractured way the origin story of Lisicky himself, in so much that he is, with every success or failure, gain or loss, created anew.
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“Should Germany Publish ‘Mein Kampf’?” Is the Wrong Question

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Should German scholars have published a new edition of Adolf Hitler’s Mein Kampf upon the expiration of its copyright? Last week, the manifesto, which the New York Times calls “a combination of memoir, party program, anti-Semitic rant and exposé on how to gain power,” was released in Germany for the first time since 1945, when the Allies banned it and awarded its publication rights to the state of Bavaria. That copyright ended on December 31, 2015.
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“Your Heart Is a Muscle The Size of a Fist”: The Rare Novel That Gets Protest Movements Right

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In 1999 — before the September 11 attacks, the War on Terror, the new anti-war movement,  the Obama campaign, Occupy Wall Street, Black Lives Matter and Bernie Sanders rallies — the focal point of American (and often worldwide) activism was corporate globalization. Protesters targeted sweatshops, labor exploitation, agreements like NAFTA and organizations like the World Trade Organization and the IMF which facilitated the capitalist “race to the bottom” worldwide. The movement was huge, formidable and well-organized, and it won its most decisive PR moment during the 1999 “Battle in Seattle,” a massive convergence of protest groups that effectively shut down a WTO meeting, at least temporarily.
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