Books

“I Did Not Wake Up Like This”: Janet Mock and Tavi Gevinson Talk Impostor Syndrome, Celebrity, and the Internet

There may have only been one flower crown in the audience at last night’s launch for Rookie Yearbook Three, but the online publication’s ethos was otherwise on full display: dyed hair, #snackwave, DIY bangs, and the unfettered, post-ironic enthusiasm that leads to fan gestures like bringing a box of chocolates for the editor-in-chief, Tavi Gevinson, and writer/activist Janet Mock. Onstage at New York’s Housing Works Bookstore last night, Gevinson and Mock talked impostor syndrome, public identity, and the platform on which they both established themselves: the Internet. … Read More

  • 0

Hanne Blank on M.F.K. Fisher and the Art of Seduction: An Excerpt From ‘Icon’

In the new book Icon, edited by Amy Scholder, fearless feminist writers and Rick Moody talk about some of our most notorious, beguiling, and trailblazing feminist figures. It’s a stacked lineup of fascination, including Mary Gaitskill on Linda Lovelace, Kate Zambreno on Kathy Acker, Danielle Henderson on bell hooks, and Johanna Fateman on Andrea Dworkin. One of my favorite essays was Hanne Blank’s sensual look at how seduction works in the food-and-everything writing of M.F.K. Fisher. Read an excerpt from Blank’s essay below; Icon is now available in stores and online. — Elisabeth Donnelly … Read More

  • 0

‘Never Can Say Goodbye': New York City Is a Hell You Can Never Leave

Hell’s Kitchen. Hell Gate. Richard Hell. The signs (and wonders) are everywhere. Abandon all hope: New York City is a living Hell of renegade capital, exploited labor, racial hatred, institutional misogyny, and bodega cats. You must say goodbye.

Or is it a neoliberal paradise, imperfect yet lovable, where capital and culture and rats roam free? … Read More

  • 0

Lena Dunham Emails Zadie Smith About Beyoncé and Nicki Minaj, Plus Other Revelations from the ‘Not That Kind of Girl’ Tour

Last night, Lena Dunham brought her 12-city book tour behind Not That Kind of Girl back home with a variety show of quirk, feminism, and friendship for Brooklyn Academy of Music’s Unbound series. The 90-minute event moved quickly, starting with cat-driven stand-up from Mike Birbiglia and a three-song set from Jack Antonoff of fun. and Bleachers (familiar to Not That Kind of Girl readers in the role of good-guy boyfriend). Dunham read two pieces from her nonfiction collection — an essay about her younger sister, Grace, and one of the book’s humorous lists of gaffes — to the intimate crowd, which included her mother Laurie Simmons and actor Jon Glaser (Parks and Recreation) sitting in the front row. Then the show really began. … Read More

  • 0

Move Over, James Franco: Tom Hanks Pens So-So Fiction for ‘New Yorker’

Move over James Franco and Steve Martin: you aren’t the only fiction-penning celebrities around. This week, The New Yorker features a short story by Tom Hanks — yes, that Tom Hanks — which seems to be heavily influenced by his time working on Apollo 13. While reading, I had do my very best to approach the story, a futuristic space-jaunt called “Alan Bean Plus Four”, as a lighthearted foray into fiction by a revered actor (director, screenwriter, producer, and cultural figure) and not as something I would mercilessly savage if I were in a fiction workshop and a “packet” of my peers’ writing had just arrived in my arms for a pre-class critique. … Read More

  • 0

Flavorwire Interview: Kim Gottlieb-Walker on Capturing John Carpenter’s Landmark Horror Classics

Her work has taken her from the Free Speech Movement in California and the underground press to the golden age of reggae (capturing Bob Marley) and a Jimi Hendrix interview in 1967 (her candid portraits of the singer are featured in the Hendrix “bible,” Classic Hendrix). But photographer Kim Gottlieb-Walker’s encounters with celebrity weren’t limited to music. She became the set photographer for filmmaker John Carpenter, capturing stills of his iconic genre films — including Halloween, The Fog, Escape from New York, Halloween II, and Christine. Her behind-the-scenes images offer insight into one of cinema’s masters of horror — a maverick artist who has thrilled and chilled us since 1974. The Carpenter photographs are the subject of a newly released book from Titan Books, On Set with John Carpenter. We recently spoke with Gottlieb-Walker about the making of Halloween, being a woman in a male-dominated industry, and the greatest Carpenter film faces. … Read More

  • 0

A Brief and Incomplete Survey of New Types of Online Literature

Last week, T Magazine published a game of exquisite corpse featuring a selection of excellent fiction writers, from Jenny Offill and James Patterson to Zadie Smith and Ben Marcus. The game was light and refreshing; the story itself twists into absurdity as some of the authors — notably the insidious R.L. Stine — appear to be pranking their peers and sort of hacking the plot as it grows. I found the form of the story simple but genuinely interesting, so I decided to pool together this chronology (or survey) of recent developments in digital or online literary forms. This is by no means a comprehensive list, nor is it meant to be. (I have, though, included some print projects that derive their form from digital media.) But it could be a starting point for a broader discussion about new literary forms, especially those new types of fiction (and criticism) that are popping up, rapidly, on Twitter and elsewhere. … Read More

  • 0

“Amazon Is Hurting America”: NY Times Columnist On Why the Hachette Conflict Goes Way Beyond Books

“Amazon.com, the giant online retailer, has too much power, and it uses that power in ways that hurt America.” Thus begins Monday’s ominously blunt column by New York Times regular and Nobel-prize winner Paul Krugman. Krugman, who covers the economy from a progressive perspective, does not approach the controversial question of Amazon: good or bad? as a an author with a recent book out, nor as a rabid culture consumer (although I did see him at a St. Vincent concert in Brooklyn once; shoutout to Paul Krugman’s music taste!) Instead, he’s writing as a politically-savvy economist who sees a company beginning to get out of control. And Krugman has some important thoughts about what Amazon has become so dangerous — not a monopoly, per se, but rather a monopsony. … Read More

  • 0

Watch: Marcel the Shell Has a New Video

When she’s not making Republicans explode with her “pro-abortion” romantic comedy or telling wonderfully elaborate fart jokes, sometimes Jenny Slate is a… Read More

  • 0

50 of the Scariest Short Stories of All Time

It’s that time of year again, when the pumpkins come out, the fake cobwebs are hung and we feel that dormant urge to be chilled, thrilled and spooked to our bones. Get out your flashlights, because a scary story awaits — actually, make that fifty of them. Now, there’s more to scary stories than goblins, ghouls, blood and your general horror — here there be monsters of many kinds, existential and literal, extraordinary and everyday. And remember: like beauty, fear is in the bloody eye of the beholder. So whether you yearn for classic horror or literary fiction guaranteed to make your skin crawl, read on. If you dare! … Read More

  • 0
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 7,969 other followers