Books

“Should Germany Publish ‘Mein Kampf’?” Is the Wrong Question

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Should German scholars have published a new edition of Adolf Hitler’s Mein Kampf upon the expiration of its copyright? Last week, the manifesto, which the New York Times calls “a combination of memoir, party program, anti-Semitic rant and exposé on how to gain power,” was released in Germany for the first time since 1945, when the Allies banned it and awarded its publication rights to the state of Bavaria. That copyright ended on December 31, 2015.
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“Your Heart Is a Muscle The Size of a Fist”: The Rare Novel That Gets Protest Movements Right

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In 1999 — before the September 11 attacks, the War on Terror, the new anti-war movement,  the Obama campaign, Occupy Wall Street, Black Lives Matter and Bernie Sanders rallies — the focal point of American (and often worldwide) activism was corporate globalization. Protesters targeted sweatshops, labor exploitation, agreements like NAFTA and organizations like the World Trade Organization and the IMF which facilitated the capitalist “race to the bottom” worldwide. The movement was huge, formidable and well-organized, and it won its most decisive PR moment during the 1999 “Battle in Seattle,” a massive convergence of protest groups that effectively shut down a WTO meeting, at least temporarily.
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The Most Anticipated Poetry Books of 2016

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From much-needed surveys of our greatest practicing poets, like Kevin Young’s Blue Laws, to new collections from post-war masters, like Adrienne Rich’s 1950-2012, this year looks to be one that lays the groundwork for poetry that will be taught, read, and discussed in the coming years. Otherwise: startlingly assured, original debuts and recovered poetry from Pablo Neruda. It’s still early in the year, but there’s already much to anticipate.
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Reading Habits of the Rich and Powerful, 2016 Edition: Gates, Zuckerberg, Obama

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The turn of the year, for whatever reason, has revealed the reading habits of three of the world’s most powerful men. Though it’s tempting to place them on a spectrum — who among Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg, and Barack Obama is truly a reader? — it’s worth noting instead that two of the above three elites abstract “reading” into a life process, whereas the remaining “reader” cultivates an idiosyncratic, sometimes unpredictable bond with books.
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In a Historic Election Year, Will We See Culture That Celebrates Female Solidarity?

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At the beginning of last year, I eagerly anticipated the rise of the “female fuckup,” a character that I predicted would spread from films like Bridesmaids and shows like Girls to all corners of mainstream culture, hopefully diversifying as she went. Rather than just being a “badass” and reflecting another recent cultural trend, 2015’s most celebrated woman could simply be bad at whatever she was trying to do.
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The 50 Most Anticipated Books of 2016

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It’s far too early to have read the major book releases of 2016 — or even the likely contenders published in the first quarter of 2016 — but at this point it’s fair to say that among all of the forthcoming novels and works of nonfiction that we’re aware of, a selection of standouts has emerged.
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