Books

Michael Bloomberg is Apparently a Really Big Fan of ‘The Paris Review’

According to Rebecca Mead (via her Twitter), Paris Review editor Lorin Stein made a pretty big reveal at last evening’s… Read More

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Ellen Gilchrist’s ‘Acts of God’ and the Anxiety of Revisiting Authors We Loved as Teenagers

I was young when I first read Ellen Gilchrist’s writing. I was 15, at my sister’s in Stockholm, pawing through her elegant, built-into-the-walls bookcase, and there was one sea-green book with a photo of a girl on the cover who may have been about my age; certainly a sulky teenager, her legs too long for her cutoffs, perched on a second-floor open window, looking out into the distance. The title of the book was I Cannot Get You Close Enough. Between the wistful teen girl on the cover and the title, I was hooked. … Read More

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6 Books That Will Prepare You for the Inevitable Robot Uprising

“Our great-grandparents loved killer robots. So do we. But why?” Daniel H. Wilson asks that question in the foreword of the short story collection he edited, Robot Uprisings, which includes work by Cory Doctrow, Scott Sigler, Charles Yu, Robin Wasserman, and many others. It’s full of stories of the near-future, when the things we created, as Jeff Abbott puts it in his piece, “wanted to be just like us.” … Read More

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‘Seven Sisters Style’: Vintage Photos of Women’s Collegiate Fashion

Since its original publication in 1965, Take Ivy has gone on to become the Bible of preppy and Ivy League style. Even today, the book’s influence can be felt on the runways of Ralph Lauren and Gant, and it remains a must for any stylish bookshelf. While the Japanese photographers who created the book captured a perfect moment in American fashion, it has always remained a mystery why there wasn’t a female counterpart to Take Ivy, especially considering the existence of the always-stylish Seven Sisters colleges. … Read More

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On Karl Ove Knausgård’s Struggle

“Speak to Knausgaard’s devotees and you will hear a persistent theme: that by writing about himself, Knausgaard has really written… Read More

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The ‘Mad Men’ Bookshelf: What Will Don Draper Read in 1969?

Few shows in television history have given their writers half as much fun as Matthew Weiner and his crew have with Mad Men. It’s why you always see so many reading lists for the show’s characters and compilations of all the books that have actually been featured on itMad Men is, at its heart, a very literary show, one whose influences are clear because its writers get to embed their favorite books into the story. Taking place in 1969, Season 7 is likely to cover world-changing events like the Apollo 11 landing on the moon, Woodstock, and the Manson Family murders (please hold your Megan death conspiracy theories), but the year was also filled with books that played a huge role in the cultural conversation of the time, and in some cases, had a lasting impact that can still be felt to this day. That’s why it wouldn’t be a surprise to see any of these book covers on the final season of Mad Men. … Read More

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50 Essential Books of Poetry That Everyone Should Read

It’s National Poetry Month, and you’re probably thinking: “I should really read more poetry. But where oh where do I start?” Well, sound the trumpets, because here is Flavorwire to the rescue! Click through for a list of 50 essential books of poetry that pretty much everyone should read. There’s something for everybody here, from the deeply established canonical works to riveting, important books by newer poets, from the Romantics to the post-modernists, from the goofy to the… Read More

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National Poetry Month Daily Poem: ‘April Rain Song’ by Langston Hughes

To celebrate National Poetry Month, Flavorwire will be posting a poem a day. For today’s installment, “April Rain Song” by… Read More

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