Books

Flavorwire Interview: Carl Wilson on James Franco, Poptimism, and His New Edition of ‘Let’s Talk About Love’

In 2007, Carl Wilson released what would go on to become the most infamous entry in Bloomsbury’s 33 1/3 series of album-focused books. While his peers were writing about players in the popular music canon and critical darling rock bands, Canadian scribe Wilson looked to one of pop’s most bemoaned divas, Céline Dion, as a gateway into a conversation about cultural taste itself. It was an engrossing read, even for those who had hoped the “My Heart Will Go On” singer might face a similar fate as Jack from Titanic. … Read More

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New VIDA Count Suggests Shocker: Women Don’t Own Children’s Literature, Either

Pop quiz: name a children’s writer. Think about them in your brain. You’re thinking about a woman, right? Probably someone like J.K. Rowling, Stephenie Meyer, or Suzanne Collins. Or maybe you’re thinking of people like John Green and Neil Gaiman? Male writers are really the outliers in children’s publishing, all the way up to YA, where the majority of heavy hitters are women. I can report that a friend (who is male) with a YA book out next year was at a retreat with his agency where he was basically the only guy in the room. But you’ll read a million features about John Green before you hear about the legions of other (female) writers out there. Occasionally someone like Maureen Johnson, the author of ten wonderful young adult novels, will stir the pot with a provocative idea, like her “Coverflip” pitch, which points out how cover images, the gender of the author, and the content inside are all inextricably linked together. While it went viral, did it make a difference? … Read More

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25 Books That Tell You Everything You Need to Know About New York

Although the middle of the country is our best hope for the future of American literature, it’s impossible to deny that New York City has inspired some of our greatest writers and books. A few of them, like the ones listed here, do an especially excellent job of summing up the experience of living in this wonderful, crazy, and always-changing city. These 25 books, no matter when they came out, explore themes that will surely resonate with those of us who make our home in the five boroughs, and provide a snapshot of life here for those who… Read More

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Michael Bloomberg is Apparently a Really Big Fan of ‘The Paris Review’

According to Rebecca Mead (via her Twitter), Paris Review editor Lorin Stein made a pretty big reveal at last evening’s… Read More

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Ellen Gilchrist’s ‘Acts of God’ and the Anxiety of Revisiting Authors We Loved as Teenagers

I was young when I first read Ellen Gilchrist’s writing. I was 15, at my sister’s in Stockholm, pawing through her elegant, built-into-the-walls bookcase, and there was one sea-green book with a photo of a girl on the cover who may have been about my age; certainly a sulky teenager, her legs too long for her cutoffs, perched on a second-floor open window, looking out into the distance. The title of the book was I Cannot Get You Close Enough. Between the wistful teen girl on the cover and the title, I was hooked. … Read More

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6 Books That Will Prepare You for the Inevitable Robot Uprising

“Our great-grandparents loved killer robots. So do we. But why?” Daniel H. Wilson asks that question in the foreword of the short story collection he edited, Robot Uprisings, which includes work by Cory Doctrow, Scott Sigler, Charles Yu, Robin Wasserman, and many others. It’s full of stories of the near-future, when the things we created, as Jeff Abbott puts it in his piece, “wanted to be just like us.” … Read More

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‘Seven Sisters Style’: Vintage Photos of Women’s Collegiate Fashion

Since its original publication in 1965, Take Ivy has gone on to become the Bible of preppy and Ivy League style. Even today, the book’s influence can be felt on the runways of Ralph Lauren and Gant, and it remains a must for any stylish bookshelf. While the Japanese photographers who created the book captured a perfect moment in American fashion, it has always remained a mystery why there wasn’t a female counterpart to Take Ivy, especially considering the existence of the always-stylish Seven Sisters colleges. … Read More

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On Karl Ove Knausgård’s Struggle

“Speak to Knausgaard’s devotees and you will hear a persistent theme: that by writing about himself, Knausgaard has really written… Read More

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