Celebrity

The Grandmother of Performance Art on Shia Labeouf, Step-Third Cousin of Performance Art

Vulture’s Jenni Avins caught Marina Abramovic on her way into BAM’s world premier of Matthew Barney’s new film, The… Read More

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That Time Nine-Year-Old Shirley Temple Got Slut-Shamed by Graham Greene

The death of Shirley Temple Black last night is bringing on all manner of reflection about child stardom, its foibles, and the possibility of surviving it and living to an elegant old age, as Black did. In the midst of this discussion, people often mention a review by the novelist Graham Greene of Temple’s work. … Read More

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Kanye Unleashes his Happiest, Most “Humbled” Tweets Ever in Honor of ‘The College Dropout’s 10th Anniversary

Today, February 10, 2014, marks the ten year anniversary of Kanye West’s flawless debut album, The College Dropout. It was on The… Read More

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Shia LaBeouf Has Officially Ruined Performance Art for Everybody

Last summer, sometime between Jay Z’s “Picasso Baby” event and whatever James Franco was up to that drove up my personal Franco Fatigue to previously uncharted levels, I had gotten my fill of performance art. Well, that’s not entirely true; I like performance art, or at least real performance art — the kind that is performed by actual artists rather than people who are already famous and have decided to do something wild and wacky for the attention of their fans who like to share funny videos of their favorite stars on Facebook. But suddenly, everyone is making performance art. The trend goes as far back as, oh, 2009, when Joaquin Phoenix grew a beard and acted like an asshole at public appearances in an effort to say, uh, something about celebrity. … Read More

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Would Padma Approve? Nick Offerman Offers Gastronomically Questionable Recipe for Getting Into Sundance

Nick Offerman seems to be infallible — even when he’s not being particularly funny, we can stare at his bedraggled… Read More

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The Best Quotes of Bill Nye’s Evolution vs. Creationism Debate

Last night, at the “state-of-the-art” Creation Museum (where guests can “see the scaffolding, smell the freshly-cut timbers in the busy work site of Noah’s Ark,” catch a performance of Men in White — in which two angels descend to help a confused teen named Wendy to assure her that “God invented everything the whole enchilada!” — and, if feeling peckish after spiritual rebirth, grab one of Noah’s famous cappuccinos or “gluten-free” options at Noah’s Café) Bill Nye the Science Guy and Ken Ham the Creationist Guy debated the fundamentals of their polarized and wholly irreconcilable beliefs. Indeed, both arguments are so contradictory that the debate was mostly immobilized by its opposition. … Read More

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Overanalyzing Courtney Love’s Pinterest Account

Courtney Love has quietly been on Pinterest for a year, but her presence on the site has gained some publicity since she opened a new, official YouTube account last week with a video addressing her “Twibel” lawsuit. Accompanying the clip were many, many comments from Love directing us to her Pinterest and unmasking some of the heretofore unclear pieces of Love shorthand and various other linguistic misdirections that seem to plague her communications. … Read More

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Presuming Woody Allen’s Innocence Is Not a Neutral Stance

You hardly need me to tell you that over the weekend, the New York Times columnist Nick Kristof posted a letter from Dylan Farrow on his blog. The letter detailed the abuse she says she suffered at Allen’s hands 20 years ago, and goes on to note that all the context-free accolades that Allen has received in the years since — from both critics and awards shows — have taken a toll on her: … Read More

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Remembering (and Reconciling) the Brilliance of Philip Seymour Hoffman

The first reactions, unsurprisingly, were shock and sadness. And then the timelines started to fill with clips from over two decades of rich, varied, heartfelt work, and with each new one, his death sounded another little jolt: “Oh God, right, he was in that too.” But there was one common thread in Philip Seymour Hoffman’s work: he was an actor of remarkable control. Many of his best performances conveyed that control, and even when he played disorderly characters, there was never a fear of Hoffman losing control of them. And that, more than his age or his persona or the sordid details of his death scene, may be the most shocking thing about his passing: that it was so clearly the death of a man who had lost control of a crippling… Read More

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