Film

‘Los Angeles Plays Itself': Cinephiles’ Favorite Rarely Seen Movie About Movies Debuts on Netflix

Once it was a whispered secret among movie obsessives: the consensus that Thom Andersen’s Los Angeles Plays Itself was a perfect film, three hours of combing through Los Angeles in a stunning multitude of clips and cuts, exploring how the city shaped the movies that shaped the city. Greeted with hosannas upon its release in 2003, it kept a supposedly necessarily low profile in the years that followed, with screenings limited to the occasional repertory-house run. … Read More

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We Will All Howl: Antony Hegarty on the State of Transfeminism

“They announced two weeks ago that in the last 40 years, the number of wild animals has dropped by one-half, and we’re expecting a 50 to 70 percent extinction event of all species by the end of the century,” Antony Hegarty says. “I always think about those stories about the last bird, or the last of a species, when they’re calling out and they don’t have the other animal, the partner that can call back to them. The idea of the disappearing voice is very resonant for me. What hears a solitary voice. What responds to a solitary voice.” … Read More

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Watch: Darren Aronofsky Filmed a Monkey and Dog Wrestling and Posted it to Youtube

Darren Aronofsky claims to have only ever posted one video on Youtube: it was, Vulture reports, footage of a… Read More

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‘The Imitation Game’ and the Intellectual Charisma of Benedict Cumberbatch

There’s a pivotal scene in the new film The Imitation Game that tells us much about star Benedict Cumberbatch’s appeal. The setup: in the thick of WWII, a brilliant mathematician named Alan Turing (Cumberbatch) heads up a team of codebreakers tasked with cracking the Nazi Enigma code. To do so, Turing has been granted £100,000 to build an elaborate machine for the job — in essence, the first computer. And like most computers, it doesn’t really work. With the Allies losing ground and a bitter commander breathing down their necks, Turing and his team finally have a breakthrough. The scene is masterfully energetic, but there’s more to it than that; it’s borderline erotic. … Read More

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James Franco Stars As Another Poet In ‘The Color of Time’ Trailer

The world, apparently, has not yet gotten its fill of James Franco. The actor/artist/short story writer is starring in the… Read More

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Look Into the Minds of Crop Circle Investigators in Footage from ‘A Field Full of Secrets’

Oftentimes, documentary filmmakers choose to look inside a world outside of their field of expertise, for the sake of (often… Read More

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Watch Carey Mulligan as Bathsheba Everdene in ‘Far From The Madding Crowd’ Trailer

Carey Mulligan has kept a low profile since Baz Luhrman’s 2013 The Great Gatsby, in which she starred as the… Read More

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‘The Babadook’ and the Real-Life Terrors of Parental Horror

The Babadook, the gripping new horror film from Australian director Jennifer Kent, is a movie filled with terrifying sequences and things jumping out from the dark, but for this viewer, the scariest scene in it happens in broad daylight. Single mother Ameila (Essie Davis) is at the park, chatting with a friend as her son Samuel (Noah Wiseman) frolics on the playground equipment nearby. As the conversation escalates in intensity, Samuel starts yelling for his mummy to watch him. She doesn’t. The music gets more harrowing, the close-ups get tighter, the kid yells louder — and I could barely keep my eyes on the screen. I’ve been at the playground with my kid; I know the danger of zoning out, for even a second. In that scene, and throughout the film, Kent is tapping into something far more unnerving than serial killers or the supernatural: the everyday terror of being a parent. It’s an approach that has produced some of the scariest movies of our time. … Read More

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10 Fascinating Films Set in a Single Location

Sisters are reunited at a secluded estate in the woods in Mona Fastvold’s brooding, restrained study of family dysfunction in The Sleepwalker. “The unplanned sibling visit turns into a socially awkward weekend getaway. There’s table banter and after-dinner dancing (to instrumental Yo La Tengo) in the vast, lamp-lit parlor,” writes Jordan Hoffman for The Guardian. “These scenes glide along, evolving into near surrealism once our characters turn in for the night and succumb to the titular somnambulism.” Relying on emotional performances, the remote house serves as the movie’s primary location — a striking manifestation of the sisters’ “self-contained universe” — where the dark family history unravels. We look at other films that find their inspiration from single locations, reflecting the interior world of their characters. … Read More

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