Film

Flavorwire’s Guide to Indie Movies You Need to See in August

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With the summer movie season winding down, we’re seeing more and more of what’s usually dubbed “counter-programming” — both at the multiplex and on indie screens. Our dozen recommendations for the later are, as usual, an eclectic bunch: personality documentaries, B-movie homages, relationship comedy/dramas, and some of the best roles for women we’ve seen this year.
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‘The End of the Tour': The David Foster Wallace Rom Com

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One thing you don’t have to say about The End of the Tour, the new David Foster Wallace movie, is that “it’s not really about David Foster Wallace at all.” Of course it isn’t. There are too many buffers between Wallace and this film to count. Nor is the film any good, as A.O. Scott tried to tell you yesterday. Scott claimed that as a film about writers, Tour “is as good as it gets.” It isn’t. You might even say the film is worse than good: it is bad.
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‘Staten Island Summer’ Is an Inauspicious Start to Colin Jost’s Film Career

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It’s hard to say whether Colin Jost can’t catch a break or if he’s caught way, way too many. On the one hand, he’s the Harvard-educated head writer of the most prestigious comedy talent farm in America, and as co-anchor of its most beloved segment, he sits at the desk that’s launched a dozen A-list careers. On the other, the critical backlash to Jost’s time at Weekend Update thus far is rivaled only by that to his extra-SNL efforts, like this New Yorker piece (sample line: “Well, guess what, I’ll slap you and the horse you rode in on.”). Staten Island Summer, which debuts on Netflix this Friday, is not likely to remedy this situation.
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Five Movies In, The ‘Mission: Impossible’ Series Finds Its Style

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Perhaps the most interesting thing about Mission: Impossible—  Rogue Nation, the latest inventively punctuated installment in Tom Cruise’s spy series, is that Mission: Impossible has actually become a franchise, almost in spite of itself. What began as yet another ‘90s film adaptation of a classic television show (as any film historian can tell you, these were the superhero movies of their era, in terms of “fuggit, sure, do another one” ubiquity) initially positioned itself as less a connected narrative than a spy anthology series, with each film sporting a new director and a totally different aesthetic. But sneakily, over the past couple of entries, a new element has emerged: consistency. And in the process, M:I has become one of our more reliably entertaining film series.
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