Film

So Bad It’s Good: Get Possessed by the Boredom of ‘Exorcist II: The Heretic’

Bad movies are not a simple matter. There are nearly as many categories of terrible movies as there are for great ones: there are films that are insultingly stupid (Batman & Robin), unintentionally funny (Birdemic), unintentionally, painfully unfunny (White Chicks), so bad they’re depressing (Transformers), and so on. But the most rewarding terrible movies are those we know as “so bad they’re good” — entertaining in their sheer incompetence, best braved in numbers, where the ham-fisted dramatics and tin-eared dialogue become fodder for years of random quotes and inside jokes. And in this spirit, Flavorwire brings you the latest installment in our monthly So Bad It’s Good feature, and a special Halloween edition, no less: John Boorman’s notorious 1977 sequel Exorcist II: The Heretic. … Read More

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How Kurosawa’s ‘Yojimbo’ Became Leone’s ‘Fistful of Dollars’

His name might not mean much to Joe Moviegoer, but among a certain kind of cinephile, Stephen Prince is a legend. Others may know their Kurosawa, but Prince wrote a brilliant deep-dive on the great Japanese director’s films (The Warrior’s Camera: The Cinema of Akira Kurosawa), although his movie-geek street cred is mostly due to his Criterion Collection audio commentaries, which appear on the DVDs and Blu-rays for pretty much every Kurosawa film they’ve released–including Yojimbo, which was the one that brought us together. Last weekend, I had the honor of talking to Prince about Yojimbo at the Tallgrass Film Festival in Wichita, Kansas (one of our favorite under-the-radar film fests). Specifically, we discussed the link between that film and its unofficial remake, A Fistful of Dollars (which also screened at the fest). … Read More

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The Scariest Movie Clowns, Ranked

They’re supposed to entertain us, but they often terrify us. What happens when a clown trades the role of a fool for that of a killer? American Horror Story: Freak Show is currently exploring the creepy clown archetype. John Carroll Lynch’s portrayal of Twisty the Clown, whose clown bag you definitely don’t want to look inside of, has already secured the titles of murderer and kidnapper. Inspired by Twisty’s truly terrible ways, we decided to explore cinema’s creepiest clowns—those who hide something dark under their makeup and are in the killing business rather than the laughing business. … Read More

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8 Films That Make Fascinating Use of Flashbacks

Alain Resnais’ Hiroshima mon amour, written by Marguerite Duras, pioneered the use of flashbacks to mimic flashes of memories. In the 1959 film, this device is used in telling the story of a French actress and Japanese architect as they share their perspectives on war. The flashback technique reminds us of the sometimes painful ways that memories persist within us, despite our best attempts to forget them. Duras, a prolific author, playwright, and filmmaker, is the subject of a current retrospective at the Film Society of Lincoln Center through October 22. In honor of her groundbreaking work, we’re revisiting other films we love that use flashbacks to tell their stories. … Read More

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Watch New Trailer for Coen-Penned, Jolie-Directed ‘Unbroken’

You’ve probably already heard something about the Angelina Jolie-directed, Coen Brothers-penned based-on-a-true-story WWII film, Unbroken, about Louis Zamperini (played by Jack… Read More

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Paul Schrader, Nicolas Cage, and Anton Yelchin Do Not Want You to See Their New Movie

Paul Schrader, the man behind the (crash-and-burn) LiLo vehicle The Canyons, has made a new movie, executive produced by Nicolas… Read More

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‘Blood Splatters Quickly': 5 Life Lessons From the Infamous Ed Wood

Most people know of Edward Wood, Jr. from Tim Burton’s Ed Wood, the 1994 “comedy-drama” starring Johnny Depp. Or if you haven’t seen the film, you may know of him simply as the cross-dressing auteur responsible for what is widely considered the worst film ever made, Plan 9 From Outer Space, and other cinematic effronteries, like Jail Bait and Bride of the Monster. The Burton film does a decent job of detailing a certain period of Wood’s life, even if it leaves out some of the sordid bits. We already know that Ed Wood (more or less) invented the genius-hack archetype in cinema, but that’s only half the story. As it turns out, he spent much of his later life writing articles and stories for proto-pornographic magazines in Hollywood. … Read More

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