Film

‘Mad Men’ Multiplex: Which 1969 Movies Will Turn Up This Season?

From the third-season cola campaign aping Bye Bye Birdie to last year’s multiple screenings of Planet of the Apes, Mad Men has always dipped generously into the pool of period cinema to help set its scene, while simultaneously drawing inspiration from films of the era (The Apartment, BUtterfield 8, Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter, and How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying — starring Bert Cooper himself, Robert Morse — leap to mind). We’ve taken some guesses at the books this season’s 1969 timeframe might introduce; here are a few of the most popular movies of that year, and how they might work their way into Don Draper’s world. … Read More

  • 0

Lars von Trier Doesn’t Hate Women. So Why Won’t the Myth of His Misogyny Die?

Any other bride would panic if the stretch limo carrying her to her wedding got stuck en route, too long to make a tight turn on a narrow country road. Not Justine, though. Her face lights up with perverse glee. She laughs. And we have our first sign that the heroine of Lars von Trier’s Melancholia does not respond to the world around her in precisely the way she’s supposed to. … Read More

  • 0

Come On, Gen Xers: Let Your Favorite ’80s Movies Die

Over the weekend, director Richard Donner told TMZ (of all places) that he and Steven Spielberg are “doin’ a sequel” to The Goonies, with “hopefully all” of the original stars. One of those stars, Corey Feldman, took to Twitter to respond to the “literally thousands of tweets [and] FB messages” he received after the news broke, confirming that director Donner, producer Spielberg, and writer Chris Columbus are working on a sequel, though “I have yet to see a script, so I remain skeptical.” (Mr. Feldman does have standards, as anyone who saw the straight-to-video Lost Boys and Dream a Little Dream sequels can tell you.) And speaking of skepticism, we also got word over the weekend that Lego Movie and 21 Jump Street director Phil Lord and Chris Miller won’t be directing the long-discussed, yes-they’re-somehow-still-talking-about-this Ghostbusters III, not that their pass will affect that project. So your favorite family-friendly comedies from 1984 and 1985 are getting sequels, 30 years later. Yay? … Read More

  • 0

The 25 Best Music Documentaries on Netflix Streaming

As the wise bard Madonna once said, “Music makes the people come together,” and she was right. Music is a source of magic in the life of human beings on earth. Sometimes people want to live inside a song so much that they make documentaries, bringing some visual acuity to aural pleasure. The best examples of this particular genre take your favorite songs, or songs you haven’t even heard before, and show how music leaves a mark on us. We rounded up a wild collection of 25 movies, from Oscar winners to cult oddities to Ken Burns, that you can watch… Read More

  • 0

The Business Cards Pop Culture Characters Would Have If They Changed Careers

There’s something both fabulous and horrifying about how static fictional worlds can be. The actors live in their own self-contained realms, with nary an opportunity for a life beyond the final shot, or page, or episode — save for maybe fan fiction. But Italian creative designers Benedetto Papi and Edoardo Santamato have envisioned new lives for pop culture icons, complete with chic, minimal business cards for their new careers, which we spotted on Design Taxi. Hogwarts becomes a cleaning agency; the Titanic, a scuba dining school; Amélie, a “selfie photographer” (whatever that means). But it’s certainly a career refresh. … Read More

  • 0

Why Tilda Swinton Will Always Be a Glorious, Meme-Friendly Mystery

Can you ever really figure out what makes somebody cool? New York magazine plumbs the depths of our favorite space-alien actress in “Tilda Swinton Is Not Quite of This World,” and Swinton, mostly, remains pretty cool. Swinton is an actor’s actor, the type of artist who’s not on the cover of magazines and not selling products, but rather picking and choosing interesting projects to give her time and her spirit. Perhaps the mystery is why her resemblance to the world’s best space alien, David Bowie, has been the subject of tribute blogs, Bowie videos, and leggings. … Read More

  • 0

25 Things You Didn’t Know About ’2001: A Space Odyssey’

The 46th anniversary of Stanley Kubrick’s cosmic epic, 2001: A Space Odyssey, is upon us. Critics were initially divided on the unusual science-fiction tale featuring a sentient computer and a mysterious monolith, but the 1968 film’s influence still resonates today. 2001 helped make room for the thinking person’s sci-fi story in Hollywood and displayed a technical prowess still copycatted in contemporary cinema. In honor of Kubrick’s landmark movie, we’ve gathered some interesting facts about 2001 that you might have… Read More

  • 0

10 of the Strangest Films Starring Non-Actors

Based on Michel Faber’s novel of the same name, Jonathan Glazer’s Under the Skin invites audiences into a parallel alien world where Scarlett Johansson plays an otherworldly seductress luring unsuspecting men into a van. Much has been made that Glazer had the actress perform this erotic stunt in reality, adding a fascinating layer to Glazer’s murky, hypnotic world. Eventually the entranced men were made aware of the truth and consented to be part of the film, which explores constructs of desire and power. It’s one of the stranger ways non-professional actors have been used in cinema. Here are ten other films starring non-actors in strange roles to rival it. … Read More

  • 0

What Scarlett Johansson’s New Movie ‘Under the Skin’ Tells Us About Her Gross ‘New Yorker’ Profile

Late last month, The New Yorker’s Anthony Lane wrote a profile of Scarlett Johansson. Maybe you heard about it; if you did, it was probably not in terribly complimentary terms. Slate’s Katy Waldman called out its “inappropriate-uncle creepiness”; Talking Points Memo’s Kay Steiger deemed it “gross”; over at The New Republic, Esther Berger crowned it “the worst profile I can remember reading in The New Yorker.” The problem with Lane’s fawning, empty piece, in a nutshell, is that it’s basically a highbrow version of a Maxim or Esquire cover story: Lane’s thesis is that Scarlett Johansson is super-duper hot, though couched in dressed-up verbiage like “Johansson looks tellingly radiant in the flesh” and “using nothing but the honey of her voice” and “she seemed to be made from champagne.” What makes the whole piece particularly irritating is that there are interesting things to be said about Johansson right now; she has two movies coming out today which couldn’t be further apart on the modern movie-making spectrum. And, compellingly, one of them can be read as a kind of tacit commentary on precisely the kind of empty objectification that the Lane profile traffics in so freely. … Read More

  • 0

How to Make a Great Superhero Movie: Hire a Comedy Director

If you look up the filmographies of Anthony and Joe Russo, directors of the new (and very good) Captain America: The Winter Soldier, you’re not going to see much that screams SUMMER TENTPOLE ACTION MOVIE MAKERS. Their only two previous features were the mostly unseen Big Deal on Madonna Street remake Welcome to Collinwood and the mostly unloved Owen Wilson comedy You, Me and Dupree. And then you will find lots and lots of television comedy, everything from the monkey-doctor comedy Animal Practice to more acclaimed programs like Arrested Development, Happy Endings, and Community. The natural assumption is that the powers-that-be at Marvel who handed the Russo brothers the keys to Captain America were taking a big chance. But Marvel has reached a point where it’s actually more unusual for them to pick conventional action directors for their films — in fact, what’s making their big-screen efforts stand out from the blockbuster pack is their tendency to place them in the hands of, when you get down to it, comedy filmmakers. … Read More

  • 0