Media

Writers, Money, and the Economy: Why Time Is the 21st Century’s “Room of One’s Own”

Ann Bauer’s eye-opening essay about being a “sponsored” writer (actually version of a piece by Bauer that’s been kicking around the writing blogosphere for a few years), published yesterday on Salon, has fostered an intense, multi-pronged online discussion about writing and money. In the piece, Bauer lists several anonymous examples of acclaimed writers who have benefited from an extra financial boost but thrive on the myth of their genius. But her main aim is to admit that she’s accomplished much, much more as writer since marrying a high earner later in life than she did in her years as a struggling mom with financial woes. … Read More

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‘Modern Farmer’ Magazine Is Dead

Pour one out for the goat cam, because the excellent National Magazine Award-winning publication Modern Farmer has now “ceased publication,” … Read More

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Happy Birthday, Choice! Abortion Stories Go Interactive for “Roe” Anniversary

The Guardian has celebrated today’s Roe v. Wade anniversary today by publishing an interactive display of individual abortion stories,… Read More

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The Genius of Genius: Welcome to the Annotated Age?

There is a familiar, cosmopolitan, holier-than-thou snobbery at work in the recent run of pieces on the media company Genius, formerly known as Rap Genius. The question, asked in every article, is fine: can Genius succeed in annotating the entire internet? But the tone — which suggests a prima facie rejection of people who listen to rap music — is always the same. Even if I find this pose weird (and ethically compromised), I’m not surprised by it. What is surprising, though, is the technology that Genius is now beta testing. I’m still unsure if Genius will succeed in turning the internet into a gigantic wall of annotation, but I’ll admit that I’m now interested in how they might pull off such a thing. … Read More

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Longform You Have to Read: The Best of George Orwell

In a world where you have more options for satisfying longform reading than ever, your friends here at Flavorwire are taking the time once a week to highlight some of the best that journalism and longform has to offer. Whether they’re unified by topic, publication, writer, being classic pieces of work, or just by a general feeling, these articles all have one thing in common: they’re essential reading. This week, we’re looking at the best of George Orwell, who passed away sixty-five years ago on January 21, 1960. … Read More

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The Market for Secrets: A Truce Between ‘Serial’ and The Intercept

The Internet is many things, but it is one thing for sure: a market for secrets. From Wikileaks to the Sony hacks, the secret told online is a story that sticks, a gift that keeps regifting. Meanwhile, we build massive cryptosystems to protect our own secrets, whether financial, sexual, political, or otherwise. In either case: the burying and unearthing of secrets is itself the secret repetition-compulsion that drives, or monetizes, digital media. Gawker began with the secret of the celebrity, Genius with the secrets behind the lyric. Medium is designed to get you to compose your own secrets and perhaps read the secrets of others. Many such outlets or platforms, in fact, can be defined by their relation or proximity to the secret. Vox wonks away the secrets of the day. The little magazine unmasks the secrets of ideology. … Read More

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Longform You Have to Read: ASME Award Nominees Edition

In a world where you have more options for satisfying longform reading than ever, your friends at Flavorwire are taking the time once a week to highlight some of the best that in-depth journalism has to offer. Whether they’re unified by topic, publication, writer, being classic pieces of work, or just by a general feeling, these articles all have one thing in common: they’re essential reading. This week, we’re highlighting five excellent pieces nominated for a 2015 National Magazine Award. … Read More

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A Week On, ‘Charlie Hebdo’ Has Become a Symbol of Everything and Nothing

A week ago, 12 people were murdered in cold blood at the offices of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. In the seven days since, the magazine has become a symbol of… well, of what, exactly? It all depends on how you look at it. If you’re of a liberal persuasion, Charlie Hebdo became a symbol of the liberal values you hold so dear. If you’re on the right, it became a symbol for some self-serving rhetoric about free speech. If you’re far left, it became a symbol of racism and oppression. If you’re Glenn Beck, it became a symbol of how Islam is an inherently violent religion, or some such nonsense. If you’re a hardliner in Pakistan, it’s a symbol of Western contempt for Islam. If you’re Richard Dawkins, it probably became a symbol of the awfulness of religion in general. And so on. … Read More

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Was Your Favorite Magazine Nominated For an ASME?

If you haven’t gotten your fill of awards fun (and outrage, naturally) today, ASME (American Society of Magazine Editors) announced… Read More

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