Media

The Best Things We Read on the Internet This Week: Teju Cole’s Twitter Essay, Hispanic Hardcore

Listicles, tweets, your ex’s Facebook status, picture of dogs wearing costumes — the internet offers no shortage of entertaining stuff to look at. But there’s plenty of substantial writing out there, too, the pieces you spend a few minutes reading and a long time thinking about after you’ve closed the tab. In this weekly feature, Flavorwire shares the best of that category. This time around, Teju Cole does something awesome on Twitter (again), the Hispanic contribution to New York City Hardcore, and much more. … Read More

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How Andrew Solomon’s Peter Lanza Piece Makes Us More Empathetic

In Leslie Jamison’s essay “The Empathy Exams,” the title piece in her upcoming book, she writes, “Empathy isn’t just listening, it’s asking the questions whose answers need to be listened to. Empathy requires inquiry as much as imagination. Empathy requires knowing you know nothing.” What the Sandy Hook shooting — or any of the 44 school shootings that have occurred since December 2012 — has taught us is that tragedy can, over time, feel unfathomable while also curdling into feeling absolutely commonplace. The rash of school shootings that have become not even front-page news in America have made us tired and frustrated. It leaves us looking for something like empathy, since it’s easy to feel just horror and sadness, looking for the balm of quick answers and a “bad guy” caught and put in jail. … Read More

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The Best Things We Read on the Internet This Week: Ukraine, Black Metal, and Ghost Hunters of LA

Listicles, tweets, your ex’s Facebook status, picture of dogs wearing costumes — the internet offers no shortage of entertaining stuff to look at. But there’s plenty of substantial writing out there, too, the pieces you spend a few minutes reading and a long time thinking about after you’ve closed the tab. In this weekly feature, Flavorwire shares the best of that category, and this week we have a very smart take on Ukraine, pickup artist boot camp, Shirley Jackson, and a lot of Black Metal. … Read More

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Vice: Legitimate Media Company or Rupert Murdoch’s Urban Outfitters?

In a new Baffler article, writer Anne Elizabeth Moore goes into Vice Media, recounting the history of the 19-year-old publication, and how it shifted from a hipster frat-boy mess of jokes and “truthtelling” to a Rupert Murdoch-approved (he has a five percent stake in the company), big media-feeding, empire of cool aimed at millennials. As Vice has become a mainstream media company, it’s been awkwardly riding the line between status quo-questioning provocateurs and professionals running a media empire — as we detailed when they responded to the controversy over the female-writer-suicide fashion spread, which they eventually took down and apologized for, like grown-ups. … Read More

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‘The Partisan Review’ and 8 Other Great Online Magazine Archives

Even though it shut down in 2003, The Partisan Review was the sort of publication whose articles and fiction deserve to be appreciated by future generations. Now, thanks to some heroic archivists, the magazine’s entire output from 1934 to its demise has been digitized, offering readers a chance to explore one of the most important intellectual institutions of the last century. Like The Partisan Review, some other great publications that have steered our cultural conversations about the arts, politics, and fiction, have also worked hard to get their back issues posted on the internet. Here are a few excellent examples to bookmark. … Read More

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The Best Writing About the 2014 Oscars

While we’ve offered up our own Oscars commentary, from the most memorable water-cooler-conversation moments to a look at Matthew McConaughey’s bewildering acceptance speech, we’ve also spotted some excellent pieces elsewhere on the internet. After the jump, a brief collection of our favorite thought-provoking responses to this year’s Academy Awards.  … Read More

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The Best Things We Read on the Internet This Week: Wall Street Scumbags, Teenage Wastelands

Listicles, tweets, your ex’s Facebook status, picture of dogs wearing costumes — the internet offers no shortage of entertaining stuff to look at. But there’s plenty of substantial writing out there, too, the pieces you spend a few minutes reading and a long time thinking about after you’ve closed the tab. In this weekly feature, Flavorwire shares the best of that category. This time around, a late contender for the ultimate Wolf of Wall Street response and a hilarious riff on T.S. Eliot’s most famous work. … Read More

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A Tale of Two Literary Magazines: ‘The Believer’ and ‘Tin House’ Respond to the VIDA Count

Since 2009, the VIDA Count has taken a hard look at the number of male vs. female contributors to several prestigious magazines and literary journals, an approach that has evolved to slice and dice each publication’s performance by section and type of article. Book reviewers, the authors of reviewed books, bylines, and the overall contributions of men and women are taken into consideration, giving  readers and editors (if they choose to use the information) a broader view of the gender makeup of each publication. … Read More

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Lean In’s Stock Image Campaign Does More for Sheryl Sandberg’s Critics Than the Feminist Cause

Unequal pay. Biased hiring practices. Internal barriers to rising through the ranks. Too many photos of ladies climbing things? Lean In’s latest initiative, a partnership with Getty Images on a special collection of 2,500 images showing women of all ages, sizes, and ethnicities engaged in tasks like looking out windows and doing CrossFit, forgoes the latter pressing issues in favor of the former. It’s true that representation of women could always use more realism and less salad. But the Getty partnership is a single (literally) cosmetic fix for about seven different structural issues. Not only does the initiative bring a gun to a snarky Tumblr fight; it’s a near-perfect embodiment of the criticisms leveled at Lean In since it began touting itself as something more than Seven Habits of Highly Effective People for the post-Facebook age.  … Read More

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Why Stuart Hall’s Groundbreaking Work on Culture and Identity Still Matters

It’s a sad week for cultural theory geeks. On Monday, the news broke that Stuart Hall had passed away at age 82, due to health complications. He was born in Jamaica, went to Oxford on a Rhodes scholarship, and became a trailblazer in British cultural studies, founding the political journal New Left Review and establishing a visual arts center in London devoted to diversity. While Hall lacks the pop-culture dazzle of Žižek or the widespread name recognition of Foucault, he was one of the most important cultural theorists alive. And now, upon his death, his work is worth remembering more than ever. … Read More

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