Politics

In Praise of J.K. Rowling’s Post ‘Harry Potter’ Career: Messy, Fun and Badass

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For years in between Harry Potter installments, J.K. Rowling kept so much under wraps. She exerted tight control over the biggest literary juggernaut of our time, managing it with fierce pride, down to the last nondisclosure agreement.

After that final book was released and the hype slowly died down, however, we’ve really gotten to know Jo Rowling, beyond the archetypal origin story of the single mom on government assistance. It turns out she is everything we could hope for in a  world famous author-cum-celebrity.
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Donald Trump’s Unearthed Rape Accusation Is a Sobering Reminder of the Person Beneath the Punchline

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It’s an average Tuesday, which means that once again, a prominent Republican figure — or in this case, his lawyer — has said something profoundly ignorant about rape. Yesterday, The Daily Beast revisited a disturbing passage in Harry Hurt III’s 1993 Lost Tycoon: The Many Lives of Donald J. Trump, one that’s newly relevant given Trump’s presidential campaign, his bigoted remarks on Mexican immigrants, and the recent, long-overdue scrutiny of powerful men accused of sexual assault.
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“Anything Is a Butt Plug If You’re Brave Enough”: A Conversation About Art, Politics, and Identity With Donald Trump Butt Plug Artist Fernando Sosa

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Donald Trump’s assessment of Mexicans in the United States as being a bunch of “people that have lots of problems” and “rapists” provoked various responses: Republicans were silent, afraid to alienate their base by condemning racism; the Twitter account that allegedly belongs to El Chapo, the Mexican drug lord who recently escaped prison for the second time, warned Trump to shut up; Cuban-American rapper Pitbull vowed to boycott Trump’s hotels; Mexican artist Dalton Javier Avalos Ramirez made the festive and cathartic papier-mâché Trump Piñata.
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“The American Dream” David Brooks Loves So Much Is Rich, White America’s Greatest Tool of Social Control

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At the very beginning of Ta-Nehisi Coates’ book Between the World and Me, the author recounts a recent television appearance wherein he was asked to discuss why he felt “that white America’s progress — or, rather, the progress of those Americans who believe that they are white — was built on looting and violence.” Coates describes how he explained his ideas. Then, at the end of the segment, he writes, “the host flashed a widely shared picture of an eleven-year-old black boy tearfully hugging a white police officer. Then she asked me about ‘hope’. And I knew then that I had failed.”
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