Theatre

‘Curb Your Enthusiasm’ Meets Moliére in Larry David’s ‘Fish in the Dark’

After the success of Seinfeld and Curb Your Enthusiasm, there are plenty of people who would probably pay good money to eat dinner with Larry David for the sole purpose of having him insult and nitpick their table manners (“You eat your peas with a fork?”) while arguing with the waitstaff about his dish’s preparation and the appropriate tip. During the matinee preview of his Broadway play A Fish in the Dark, that I attended, David got close to the biggest applause of the afternoon for flubbing a line and ad-libbing, “I messed that up.” Later, when he finally recited his signature line — “prettay, prettay good” — the Cort Theatre went nuts. In other words, the bar for his fans’ appreciation is prettay, prettay low. … Read More

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Can National Theatre of Scotland’s ‘Let the Right One In’ Pave the Way for Horror on the Stage?

Throughout the National Theatre of Scotland’s Let the Right One In, adapted from John Ajvide Lindqvist’s novel and Tomas Alfredson‘s film, audiences are subjected to a parade of lyrically gruesome images: a man tied upside-down to a tree, his throat perfunctorily slit and drained into a bucket; another man literally self-effacing with acid; a diminutive teenage girl in a candy-pink sweater whose mouth brims with vomit when she actually tries to eat candy, and whose face cascades with blood every time she enters a home uninvited. All of this stirs a reverent, rapt silence in the audience. This is not the type of play where spectators listlessly turn to their programs mid-show, pretending that looking up the catering credits will somehow enhance their experience. … Read More

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Jane Eyre, Lizzy Bennet, and Jo March Walk Onto a Stage: Remixing a New Canon of Heroines

Last night I saw You on the Moors Now, an experimental play currently running in New York City’s Greenwich Village, which cannily combines characters and plot points from four novels: Little Women, Pride and Prejudice, Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights. The story, such as it is, consists of the respective heroines banding together after spurning their various suitors. They end up camping out on the moors. Meanwhile, they are pursued by the rejected men, themselves united in an attempt at revenge, or requited love, or some other concession. The cast features a delightfully queered Mr. Darcy, a manic Jane Eyre who longs to travel in space, a Cathy Earnshaw with unexpectedly pronounced leadership qualities, and sundry twists and gimmicks which wouldn’t have worked if much of the audience didn’t have a basic understanding of at least a few of the four novels. … Read More

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Pot, Kettle, Etc.: Bill O’Reilly Probably Lied About His War Reporting

Insert your own stone-throwing, glasses-houses variation here: the spotlight is shining brighter on Fox News commentator Bill… Read More

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John Cameron Mitchell Sees Follow-Up to ‘Hedwig’ as an ‘Olive Kitteridge’-Like Miniseries

After Neil Patrick Harris, Andrew Rannells (The Book of Mormon), and Michael C. Hall reignited the flames of Hedwig fandom as… Read More

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The Relentless Award, Founded in Honor of Philip Seymour Hoffman, Gives New Playwrights $45k

It’s been nearly a year to the day that Philip Seymour Hoffman, noted film actor and devotee of the… Read More

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Jim Parsons to Play God on Broadway

Jim Parsons is about to join an exclusive club consisting of the likes of Whoopi Goldberg, Morgan Freeman, and that… Read More

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Blur Frontman & Gorillaz Co-Founder Damon Albarn Is Penning an ‘Alice in Wonderland’ Musical

We’ve seen our fair share of Alice in Wonderland adaptations and rode a fair share of Spinning Teacups; Lewis Carroll’s… Read More

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Some Colleges Are Moving Past Eve Ensler’s “Cisnormative” ‘Vagina Monologues’ — And That’s OK

Approach anyone who matriculated at an American college in the last two decades or so, and they’ve probably attended, participated in, or critiqued a production of Eve Ensler’s The Vagina Monologues. The Monologues, along with the related V-Day organization which combats violence against women, has created a staple alternative Valentine’s Day celebration. They’ve also become a part of the cultural vocabulary of late Gen-Xers and millennials, particularly anyone of the feminist or theatrical persuasions. “My vagina’s angry!” we cry, quoting one of the funnier monologues, in a mix of irony and nostalgia. … Read More

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