Art

Vintage Photos Transformed Into Dreamlike Portraits

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Australian artist Jane Long’s Dancing with Costică series is inspired by the works of Romanian war photographer Costică Acsinte (or Axinte). Long was searching for photos to practice her retouching skills on and discovered an online archive of Acsinte’s images taken during the 1930s and ‘40s. “I will probably never know the real stories of these people but in my mind they became characters in tales of my own invention,” Long said of the work. The artist created an otherworldly landscape for the figures in Acsinte’s images, lending a surreal and dreamlike quality to the portraits. See the before and after, below.
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The Inner Life of Toronto Mannequins Revealed

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Toronto-based artist Mikäel Surget, who we learned about on Ego-AlterEgo, took a trip to Kensington Market for his birthday and found himself inspired to search for mannequins to photograph. “I know they are inanimate objects, but I see pain and struggle,” Surget wrote of his excursion. The artist transfers the photos with mixed media on wood, referencing the materiality of the object and highlighting the surface imperfections of his canvas. Surge calls them “damaged mannequins,” deconstructing the image and exposing emotions — “like I have deconstructed myself and rebuilding it to represent the beauty that lies beneath.”
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Black-and-White Photos of Vintage Movie Theater Box Offices from the 1970s

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Most movie theaters lack the character of those from earlier times. Boxy mall movie houses, chain cinemaplexes, and other monstrosities dominate our current filmic climate. But photographer Ave Pildas won’t let us forget the unique movie theaters of yesteryear thanks to a photo series featuring theater boxes offices captured during the 1970s. Most of the theaters were photographed in Los Angeles — and many of them no longer stand.
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Banksy Unveils His Biggest Exhibit Ever: ‘Dismaland,’ the World’s Most Depressing Theme Park

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Or is it the world’s least depressing theme park? Since theme parks are essentially hermetically sealed micro-societies in which brands artificially replicate the human experience of joy — and where humans submit to being shaken and spun and turned upside down to feel alive — perhaps the “happiest place on Earth” would actually be one that dismantled the “theme park” via disturbingly illuminating imagery. 
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