Art

The Autobiographical Haunted House of Artist Alex Da Corte

Philadelphia-based artist Alex Da Corte, who celebrates his first major museum solo exhibition at MASS MoCA in 2016, has taken over gallery Luxembourg & Dayan’s East 77th Street townhouse for his newest installation, Die Hexe (“The Witch,” but for the artist it means “death of symbol”). Da Corte’s haunted house tableau references everything from his grandmother (who was a dollhouse maker), to the building’s former residents (The Mamas & the Papas), to Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s decadent 1972 film, The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant. The artist also joins his personal history with that of the art world. Die Hexe features cleverly hidden nods to artists like Mike Kelley, Robert Gober, and Haim Steinbach, taking visitors “on a journey through surreal interiors where familiar imagery and obscure biographical references mingle, repeat, trade places, and morph into new provocations that invite reflections upon memory, impulse, the stability of knowledge, and what constitutes value in a work of art.” Die Hexe will be on view at Luxembourg & Dayan through April 11. … Read More

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Banksy Posts Biting, Satirical Tourist Video of Gaza

Operation Protective Edge killed over an estimated 2,100 Palestinians (most of whom were civilians) and destroyed 18,000 homes in the crowded… Read More

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Flavorwire Exclusive: A Lesson on Art School by Chris Kraus

The work of Chris Kraus — the American novelist, critic or fictocritic, professor of film, filmmaker, and editor — is irreducible to a single mode of artistic output. Nevertheless, in recent years, Kraus has been known more in her capacity as “the art world’s favorite fiction writer,” or, as  Kate Zambreno put it, as a writer who “radicalized a vernacular criticism that involves the self” and “[is] influential in re-innovating the idea of the nonfiction novel.” In whatever mode, Kraus draws fearlessly from her life as an artist. In the below short excerpt, taken from Phaidon’s new Akademie X: Lessons in Art + Life, Kraus does the same, effortlessly combining biography and criticism to deliver a sui generis lesson on art school. Included at the bottom is Kraus’ selection of reading, viewing, and other assignments for would-be students. … Read More

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‘Restricted Areas': Photos of Forgotten Futures Fading Into the Snow

Russian photographer Danila Tkachenko’s series Restricted Areas, which we spotted via Faith is Torment, is a catalog of what the artist calls “secret cities that cannot be found on maps, forgotten scientific triumphs, abandoned buildings of almost inhuman complexity… the perfect technocratic future that never came.” The fact that because this is Russia, all Tkachenko’s locations are whited out by apparently endless snow, only makes the photos more starkly beautiful. You can see more of the photographer’s work at his website. … Read More

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Intimate Photos of the DC Underground Drag Scene

In Ryan Florig’s photo series Tuck, the artist takes us behind the scenes of the DC underground drag scene, where the wigs come off. First spotted on Juxtapoz, Florig hopes to change the public’s perspective of the city’s drag queens, revealing intimate and glamorous moments as the ladies dress for the evening’s festivities. The camaraderie amongst the group is clear. But Florig’s camera doesn’t miss a moment and shows us when things get a little raunchy, too. The images are honest and not just invested in the facade. Florig’s black-and-white palette is striking and allows us to focus on the people behind the outrageous makeup and costumes. … Read More

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Remembering the Cool Covers of Cult Cinema Magazine ‘Psychotronic Video’

What started as a hand-written, photocopied weekly fanzine became a time capsule of horror, exploitation, and weird cinema. Psychotronic Video, self-published and created by Michael J. Weldon, was born in the 1980s as “an alternate guide to movies on local TV stations.” The definition of “Psychotronic cinema” is long and varied, but one look at the covers of Weldon’s zine, several of which we spotted on Dangerous Minds this week, and you get the picture. Think grindhouse, drive-in, and science fiction matinée. Along with Weldon’s famous reviews were interviews with cult filmmakers like Larry Cohen, Timothy Carey, and Radley Metzger. The Psychotronic Encyclopedia Of Film was published in 1983, before Weldon even owned a VCR. There was a Psychotronic store in New York City’s East Village for a time, until high rents forced Weldon out. He’s since opened a Psychotronic store in Augusta, Georgia — but Psychotronic Video lives on amongst fans of collectible cult ephemera. Head to our gallery for monsters, shrieking women, and nods to the coolest cult films in cinema. … Read More

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A Makeup Artist Debunks Those Unretouched Beyoncé Photos

Another day, more fake internet outrage. Yesterday, fansite Beyoncé World posted hundreds of unretouched stills from Bey’s 2013 L’Oréal ad campaigns (for Feria and Infallible lipstick), proving once and for all that the pop star has — wait for it — real human SKIN! The kind that is susceptible to pimples! Clearly every previously held perception of Queen Bey is shattered at the realization that she is a mere mortal. I’ll wait while you dismantle your shrine(s) to her.

… Read More

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