Art

Kim-Kardashian-Selfish-Cover

Nothing Is Embarrassing: On Kim Kardashian’s Strangely Liberating Book of Selfies

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Selfish, Kim Kardashian’s new 445-page book of selfies, is a bit of a party trick. Pull out the compact, three-pound art book at a social function, and people clamor to flip through the hundreds of near-identical selfies that chart Kim’s evolution both as a human and as a brand (is there a difference?). Some took a meta selfie with the book, Kim’s damp bosom and dewy face overshadowing their own smiles in the foreground.
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Photo credit: Lisa Sorgini

The Ethereal Beauty of Drowned Flowers

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Sydney-based photographer Lisa Sorgini’s has a penchant for flowers. The artist, who we discovered on Fubiz, captures their natural beauty in her series Flotsam, which finds colorful blooms drowned in water. Tiny air bubbles create the illusion that these petals are Shakespeare’s Ophelia, reborn. Sorgini’s bouquets are water flowers, sturdy emergent plants, but the photographer depicts them as vulnerable in their own environment when encountering the human touch.
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Photo credit: Andres Amador

Breathtaking Sand Paintings Adorning the Beaches of California

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The beaches of Northern California are transformed into swirling artworks and stunning geometric designs after Andres Amador uses a rake and rope on them. The San Francisco-born artist’s organic “beach murals” take about two hours to create during low tide and can measure 90,000 square feet and beyond. “There is an esoteric fractal quality of being within the pattern that is being made — it feels to have relevance in other aspects of my life, of building a larger pattern from the inside, not fully knowing what is resulting,” writes Amador. While the artist connects with each sand painting during the process, he fully accepts when nature erases his masterpiece: “Ultimately, when it is finished, I let it go. For me the energy and draw is around the act of creation.” See more of Amador’s beautiful sandscapes, which we first spotted on Beautiful/Decay, below.
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Natalie Frank, Bearskin, 2011-14, Gouache and Chalk Pastel on Arches Paper, 22 x 30 in., Rhona Hoffman Gallery (Chicago) and ACME (Los Angeles) and Natalie Frank.

Violent, Erotic Illustrations for Brothers Grimm Fairy Tales

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When we think of the Brothers Grimm, we often think of their fairy tales as children’s stories — and, to be fair, the stories were labeled as such early and often. But the original narratives, the unsanitized versions of the tales, featured explicit representations of violence and sexuality. It was only in the later editions that the stories were fumigated in the suffocating gas of morality.
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Lydia Lunch. Photo credit: Jasmine Hirst

“Pleasure Is the Ultimate Rebellion”: Lydia Lunch on Making Poetry Out of Horror, Uncompromising Self-Love, and Her First Major Retrospective

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Lydia Lunch, no wave queen and teenage runaway turned Teenage Jesus, is back in New York City, where it all started for her in the 1970s. Lydia Lunch: So Real It Hurts, her first major retrospective, opens at Howl! Happening May 8 and surveys her photography series The War Is Never Over, the provocative installation You Are Not Safe in Your Own Home, and the many letters, posters, and ephemera from her incredible, nearly 40-year career. Performances and live events accompany the exhibit, which runs through June 5. A contrarian, hysterian, and hedonist, Lunch’s song lyrics, writings, photography, and spoken word performances peel back the skin and peer deep into the chasm of contemporary culture. While she searches for a home for her archives, readies for a new release from her band Retrovirus, preps to teach at a university summer writing program, and sees a vinyl reissue of the powerful Conspiracy of Women on Nicolas Jaar’s label Other People, the iconoclast shared her views on how to be the ultimate confrontationist.
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Image credit: DrFaustusAU

Nick Cave’s “Red Right Hand,” Reimagined as a Dr. Seuss Book

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The Internet can be the worst place, but occasionally something comes along that makes you glad that it exists — like, for instance, this Dr Seuss-style rendering of Nick Cave’s “Red Right Hand.” These are the things you’d never get to see if it wasn’t for the web — they’d be in someone’s desk drawer, or something the artist’s friends laughed at in delight over drinks. Instead, the whole world can appreciate the work of one DrFaustusAU (who previously gave us a Seussian interpretation of The Call of Chthulu). This, which we discovered via Dangerous Minds, may just be his/her finest work yet. Click through and marvel at just how well it works.
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