Art

Mind-Bending Glitch Art Renderings of Historical and Natural Imagery

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Inspired by glitch art, symbolism, writers like H.P. Lovecraft, and the Internet, Italian artist Giacomo Carmagnola explores classic and historical imagery through a warped digital lens. Some of his reimaginings are subtle, as in the case of a small boat traversing the open sea, while others render human figures and faces into nightmarish glitch-ridden landscapes. Carmagnola, who we first spotted on Scene 360, seems to be fascinated by forces of nature — things that cannot be controlled, like lava, fire, and amusingly, the bloody elevator scene in Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining. The a closer look in our gallery.
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Otherworldly Photos of an Abandoned Detroit Home Filled with Thousands of Flowers

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Recently, Philadelphia artists Jacob Hellman and Billy and Steven Dufala gave a crumbling row house a funeral, complete with oversized casket sprays. Lisa Waud, owner of floral design company Pot & Box, is doing something similar for an abandoned Detroit home, called Flower House. This October, she will collaborate with a group of florists nationwide to fill the interior walls and ceilings of the house with fresh flowers and living plants for one weekend. The home will then be torn down and repurposed for an urban flower farm. See a preview of what’s in store in our gallery (from a preview event, with over 4,000 blooms), with thanks to Beautiful/Decay, and find out how you can get involved on the project website.
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Richard Prince’s Instagram Project Isn’t Just Morally Questionable — It’s Boring Art

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At this point, there remains very little to say about an artist who has been as roundly, comprehensively, and rightly criticized as Richard Prince has over the years. Even so, there’s something particularly egregious about the art world’s most notorious magpie’s new project, which, as widely reported, consists of printed screenshots of people’s Instagram photos. The fact that Prince has been selling these images for $90,000 apiece probably says more about the gullible nature of fine art collectors than anything else, but it does add insult to injury for anyone who happens to be the subject of one of the pictures that have been lifted.
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Taking Wigstock: Michael James O’Brien’s ’90s Drag Portraits Capture an Explosive Moment in Queer Visibility

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In the 1990s, drag shimmied into the American mainstream in films like The Birdcage and To Wong Foo, Thanks for Everything, Julie Newmar. If you grew up in this era, it was likely through these imaginary portraits of the drag world that you came to have a vague understanding of drag’s traditions and manifold sensibilities. Meanwhile, documentaries like Paris Is Burning and Wigstock: the Movie gave those who were interested in drag beyond its potential for moving straight audiences with introductory comedy narratives a closer, anthropological look at the celebratory scene — one that provided room for ecstatic transgression and self-exploration towards the end of a devastating era for the queer community.
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Artist Patches Chicago Potholes With Delicious-Looking Ice Cream Mosaics

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There’s nothing more refreshing on a hot summer day in the city than a delicious frozen treat, ideally dispensed by a smiling young person in a pastel-painted truck. But ice cream hits the urban streets in an entirely different way in the mosaics of Jim Bachor, an artist whose work in the medium was inspired by a trip to Pompeii, where he volunteered on an archeological dig. “In the ancient world, mosaics were used to capture images of everyday life. These colorful pieces of stone or glass set in mortar were the photographs of empires long past,” Bachor writes in his artist statement. His Treats in the Streets series, which we spotted via Beautiful/Decay, is a perfect contemporary adaptation of this idea — that also happens to look good enough to eat. Best of all, the artworks serve a practical purpose: they’re patching potholes in Chicago. Click through to see a selection of highlights from the series.
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Charming Photos of a Bookworm Reading in Unexpected Public Places

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Prague-based photographer Jakub Pavlovsky has one motto: take the time to read — anywhere, anytime. His self-portrait series Book’s Calling, which we spotted on Lost at E Minor, features the artist sitting cross-legged and buried in a book in some rather unusual and beautiful spots. Pavlovsky pays no mind to the crowds that bustle around him while sitting in the middle of the street. He reads atop public sculptures, on bridges, in the middle of a subway car, in a field, and other unusual spots. The photographer’s Instagram account is full of inspiring images that make us want to grab our favorite book and head outside to take a seat wherever we damn well please. Pavlovsky has also donated several hundred books to local retirement communities to further promote the love and importance of reading, hoping to encourage others to do the same.
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Stunning Photos of a Haitian Art Collective’s Ingenious Interpretation of the Tarot

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Since 2007, award-winning photographer Alice Smeets, who we discovered on Supersonic, has been traveling to and living in Haiti, documenting the country and its people. Moved by Haitian spirituality and a group of artists in the slums of downtown Port-au-Prince known as Atis Rezistans, Smeets collaborated with the group to create a stunning photographic version of the tarot deck. Replicating scenes from the popular Rider-Waite deck with found objects and original works of art, featuring the Atis Rezistans as models, the artists titled the series The Ghetto Tarot.
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‘Star Wars’ Meets Kids’ Imaginations in Craig Davison’s Evocative Paintings

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If your childhood entailed a healthy mix of both getting lost in Nintendo and playing outside with your tangible friends, then British artist Craig Davison‘s Star Wars paintings will warm your heart and simultaneously make you wish that paper-towel rolls could still transform into lightsabers. In Davison’s series, pre-tweens use their imaginations to travel to a galaxy far, far away and craftily become beloved characters from George Lucas’ epic Star Wars universe. Clicking through the slideshow, you’ll encounter a makeshift Luke Skywalker (using Grandpa’s cane as a lightsaber), Yoda (with ears made from clothespins), R2-D2 (whose rotund head is crafted with a bowl), Princess Leia (toting a hair-dryer gun), Darth Vaders in hoodies, and spacecrafts made from the lids of trashcans. Prints of Davison’s work are available to purchase online from the ArtMarket and The Hawthorn Gallery websites. Feel the force!
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