Art

From ’70s NYC Icons to Noble Animals: Peter Hujar’s Poetic Portraits and Sweeping Cityscapes

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Peter Hujar, known for his candid and intimate black-and-white portraits, photographed some of the most exciting minds and personalities of the 20th century. Peter Hujar: 21 Pictures, presented by Fraenkel Gallery from January 7 to March 5, 2016 (the fourth solo exhibition of Hujar’s work), will explore the artist’s 30-year career, including his less familiar photos of gritty city life in the ‘70s and ‘80s, seascapes, still lifes, and animals.
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‘Punk’ Magazine’s Iconic Covers That Captured the Rise of the ’70s NYC Scene

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Artist John Holmstrom, publisher Ged Dunn, and journalist Legs McNeil started Punk magazine in 1976 as former high school friends looking for scene cred and free drinks. The cartoons meets rock fanzine captured the flavor of New York City’s Lower East Side and its thriving underground art and music world. Forty years later, gallery and performance space Howl! Happening is looking back at Punk’s colorful history with an exhibition commemorating the magazine’s first issue, featuring Loud Reed on the cover (drawn by Holmstrom). The show runs January 14 to January 30.
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Heartwarming Photo Booth Snapshots of Adorable Shelter Dogs

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Take a group of dogs aching for affection and a home to call their own. Add one photo booth and a professional photographer who loves animals. These adorable photos are the results. Guinnever Shuster worked with the pups at the Humane Society of Utah (which is also selling a 2016 calendar featuring different images) by capturing their personalities on camera. Thankfully, the dogs were all successfully adopted. Brace yourself for total cuteness in our gallery.
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PJ Harvey Shreds, Explores Ruins in Teaser for New Album

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It’s been nearly five years since the release of PJ Harvey’s last album, the excellent Let England Shake, but finally there’s news of a solid release from the British songstress. In a brief (but, yeah, pretty) video, Harvey records one of her new songs and explores ruins. The video ends with the announcement that a new, currently untitled PJ Harvey album will be released in Spring of 2016. 
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Darkly Beautiful Photos of the Invasive Kudzu Plant

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The narrative we hear most about nature these days is that we pose an existential threat to it — decades of global warming, deforestation, pollution, and constant damage have left our environment in a fragile, vulnerable state. In this light, it’s easy to forget that for most of human history, nature has posed an existential threat to us.
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Art Historical Figures as Unexpected Street Art Collages Around the World

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Artist and filmmaker Julien de Casabianca transports art historical figures to modern-day settings, pasting them to brick walls and urban corners to create an unexpected street-art collage. He chooses to wheatpaste the figures in the same cities as the museums they hail from. And to complete his vision, he invites viewers to take photos of the ancient subjects and “free” them into the world.
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Screaming Artworks That Use the Human Howl as Their Focus

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We’re not sure how Edvard Munch would feel about his tortured Expressionist painting The Scream being used to sell tote bags, umbrellas, and greeting cards. But the Norwegian painter might get a kick out of knowing that his famous creation was stolen twice — and was luckily recaptured. The painting of an agonized figure set against a hellish landscape — which Munch technically titled Der Schrei der Natur (The Scream of Nature) — has been parodied and imitated so much, the mere expression (à la Home Alone) is instantly recognizable. Nobody depicts a blood-curdling howl quite like Munch, but other artists have used the scream as a focus of their work in fascinating ways.
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Ghoulish 19th-Century European Posters About the Dark Side of Life

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The Century Guild Gallery in Culver City, California specializes in international Art Nouveau and Symbolist works, namely lithographs, created during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele, Alphonse Mucha, and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec are just a few of the famous names you’ve probably heard before. The gallery also has an appreciation for the silent film era/German cabaret, including directors like Fritz Lang — who created the most expensive movie of his time, 1927’s Metropolis. Dangerous Minds recently shared a selection of ghoulish posters from the gallery’s collection that are being sold as Patronage Prints.
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In Molly Crabapple’s ‘Drawing Blood,’ the Millennial Generation’s First Great Radical Artist Tells Her Story

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Those of us born in the 1980s who drew on the walls, jammed in the garage, and filled notebooks with words have just recently emerged as fully formed adult artists, with work in hand to show for it: paintings, albums, chapbooks, novels. Some of us have fans around the world, some of us share within our immediate community, but in all of our work we can see reflections of our common journey: the shared experiences that define our view.
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