Art

Lydia Lunch. Photo credit: Jasmine Hirst

“Pleasure Is the Ultimate Rebellion”: Lydia Lunch on Making Poetry Out of Horror, Uncompromising Self-Love, and Her First Major Retrospective

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Lydia Lunch, no wave queen and teenage runaway turned Teenage Jesus, is back in New York City, where it all started for her in the 1970s. Lydia Lunch: So Real It Hurts, her first major retrospective, opens at Howl! Happening May 8 and surveys her photography series The War Is Never Over, the provocative installation You Are Not Safe in Your Own Home, and the many letters, posters, and ephemera from her incredible, nearly 40-year career. Performances and live events accompany the exhibit, which runs through June 5. A contrarian, hysterian, and hedonist, Lunch’s song lyrics, writings, photography, and spoken word performances peel back the skin and peer deep into the chasm of contemporary culture. While she searches for a home for her archives, readies for a new release from her band Retrovirus, preps to teach at a university summer writing program, and sees a vinyl reissue of the powerful Conspiracy of Women on Nicolas Jaar’s label Other People, the iconoclast shared her views on how to be the ultimate confrontationist.
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Image credit: DrFaustusAU

Nick Cave’s “Red Right Hand,” Reimagined as a Dr. Seuss Book

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The Internet can be the worst place, but occasionally something comes along that makes you glad that it exists — like, for instance, this Dr Seuss-style rendering of Nick Cave’s “Red Right Hand.” These are the things you’d never get to see if it wasn’t for the web — they’d be in someone’s desk drawer, or something the artist’s friends laughed at in delight over drinks. Instead, the whole world can appreciate the work of one DrFaustusAU (who previously gave us a Seussian interpretation of The Call of Chthulu). This, which we discovered via Dangerous Minds, may just be his/her finest work yet. Click through and marvel at just how well it works.
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Photo credit: Andrew B. Myers

Fascinating Photos That Explore the Confluence of Digital and Analog

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As someone who’s a fan of isometric video games like SimCity and ’90s RPGs in general, the work of photographer Andrew B. Myers (which we spotted via Feature Shoot), caught my eye for one simple reason: it looks like it’s straight out of one of those games! But it’s not, and the closer you look, the more the subtleties of Myers’ work reveal themselves. These are real objects, set out like a sort of virtual still life: his images aren’t all isometric, but whatever the perspective, these images seem to explore a sort of uncanny border zone between the digital and the “real.” You can see more of Myers’ work at his website.
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Photo credit: Rebecca Litchfield

Haunting Photos of Abandoned Soviet Buildings

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Photographer Rebecca Litchfield, who we discovered on Fubiz, is fascinated by the abandoned architecture that still stands across 13 countries that were once part of the Soviet Union. She has documented the crumbling state of many schools, theaters, asylums, and factories that were left to the elements, a ghostly reference to the fallen Communist empire. “Rebecca’s work shines a light on a society shrouded by the cold war, offering a touching document of the daily lives of the Soviet people,” the artist’s website shares. These are the classrooms, job sites, and arts halls where the population once gathered, now forgotten by time. See more of Litchfield’s haunting work in our gallery. Purchase her book Soviet Ghosts for more photographs.
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christo

Art Installations That Imagine the Impossible

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Next summer, contemporary environmental artist Christo will create floating walkways around Lake Iseo, west of Venice in the Lombardy region of Italy. Bright yellow fabric will invite visitors to stroll through the area — walking on water atop 200,000 floating cubes — that joins the mainland to the lake islands, continuing into the streets in two mainland towns. This is Christo’s first major work since the death of his longtime collaborator Jeanne-Claude in 2009. Christo’s stunning landscape installations have always imagined the impossible — but he is hardly… Read More

From the Circus Museum

Whimsical Vintage European Circus Poster Art

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Englishman Philip Astley is credited with inventing the modern circus, but the art form and entertainment spectacle dates back to ancient times where trained beasts and chariot races brought audiences to a roar. These boldly colored vintage posters of circus acts from the 19th and early 20th centuries show how the circus evolved on European shores. The images come from the Circus Museum in the Netherlands — we first spotted them on Juxtapoz — and they feature whimsical characters and eye-catching designs.
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Terrifying 1906 Illustrations of H. G. Wells’ ‘The War of the Worlds’

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Brazilian artist Henrique Alvim Corrêa’s career was cut short when he died at only 34 years old. But the illustrator left behind a small science-fiction legacy thanks to his 1906 artworks detailing the Martian invasion of London in H. G. Wells’ novel The War of the Worlds. Wells’ tale preyed upon turn-of-the-century fears about the apocalypse and other Victorian superstitions (and social prejudices) regarding the unknown. Corrêa’s fantastical, murky style is fitting of Wells’ dark themes. The Martian fighting machines resemble frightening legions of massive spiders. There were only 500 copies of the Belgian edition of Welles’ story with Corrêa’s artworks, which we spotted on website Monster Brains (run by illustrator Aeron Alfrey), but you can see some of the images in our… Read More

newyork

10 Striking Works of Larger-Than-Life Street Art

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Artists are finding new and exciting ways to capture our imaginations thanks to the proliferation of street art around the world. Street art engages the public, public space, multimedia concepts, and can indulge in the boundarylessness of the city streets, sprawling just as the architecture of the urban jungle does. These street artists show how the art form is growing, not only in popularity and acceptance, but also in size. After spotting a new piece from French street artist JR that made the cover of the New York Times Magazine (featured, below), we explored other large-scale street art works that use painting, installation, performance, and sculpture to play with scale and perception.
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Lena Dunham

Old-Timey Portraits of Celebrities Captured With a Vintage Camera

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“We live in an age of glossy magazines and overly retouched skin. But there is no lying with tintypes. You can’t get rid of a few wrinkles in Photoshop,” says photographer Victoria Will. The artist captured celebrities at this year’s Sundance Film Festival using the old-timey tintype technique that hails from the 19th century. Back then, photos needed eight minutes to develop, which left sitters struggling through the ultra-long exposure time. To aid the process during the festival, Will used modern flash heads with a powerful light to speed up the process. Here are rarely seen portraits of celebrities, wrinkles and all, with a great old-fashioned feeling.
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