Photography

From Bountiful. Photo credit: Noah Emrich

Stark and Moving Photographs of Post-Recession America

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During the summer of 2013, photographer Noah Emrich embarked upon a 12,000-mile trip around the US, with the goal of capturing the post-recession American landscape. “The towns I visited are the sites of disinvestment; those places exploited in order to support the upward growth of our financial and corporate sectors,” he says in a statement. Bountiful, his new book from Done to Death Projects, is the result of that journey.
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Photo credit: Michael Massaia

Otherworldly Aerial Photos of Couples Lounging in Central Park

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Sheep Meadow in Central Park “was originally the home to a flock of pure bred sheep from 1864 until 1934.” Since then, the area has been restored and maintained, becoming the city’s first Quiet Zone. A tiny slice of Zen for sunbathers, picnickers, and families looking for a quick getaway from the rat race, Sheep Meadow is also a draw for photographer Michael Massaia. The artist captures photos of couples lounging on Sheep Meadow from above, presenting them in abstract form, divorced from their surroundings. We’re left with the language of an embrace or a languid pose. Massaia exhibits the photos vertically with a dark background, which makes it seem as though each couple is floating in the ether, an otherworldly space and time.
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southwold_beach_huts

Writers’ Stunning Photos of the Places That Inspire Them and Make Them Think

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Inspiration isn’t easy to tap into in our plugged-in, oversaturated world. Writers and other creative people often crave solitude, peace, or a place to recharge so they can commit to their work — whether that place is a window on a stunning natural environment, a quiet desk in the middle of urban bustle, a beautiful temple to art, or a cozy chair or kitchen table. We asked 13 fiction writers with books either coming soon or just published to send us a photo of their favorite places to work, get inspired, or welcome the muse — whether they’re crafting YA page-turners or drafting slow short… Read More

Photo credit: William Gedney

A Single Frame on Myrtle Avenue: William Gedney Chronicles the Passage of Time in Brooklyn

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If photography is the art of capturing a moment, then this series of images by the late William Gedney (which we spotted at Burned Shoes) takes the concept to the extreme. They represent the evolution of a single scene, namely the view from Gedney’s window on Myrtle Avenue in Brooklyn. As the frames tick by, the weather changes from winter to summer and back again, and the elevated subway is dismantled (which places the pictures in the 1950s, if our highly scientific Wikipedia research is correct). And all the while, people flit in and out of the frame — running for the train, working, or just hanging out. The result is both a fascinating document of New York City and a meditation on the passing of time.
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Studio Charlie Le Mindu // London // April 2009 //
photo by Holger Talinski, from "What Else Is In the Teaches of Peaches"

Five Years Chronicling the Teaches of Peaches: Photos From Her New Book

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“Sucking on my titties like you wanted me/ Calling me, all the time like Blondie/ Check out my Chrissie be-Hynde/ It’s fine, all of the time.” These were the first words many heard from Peaches, on her 2000 single “Fuck the Pain Away.” Fifteen years later, it seems like a relatively tame opening statement from the transgressive cult provocateur born Merrill… Read More

Photo credit: Andrew Boyle

Exclusive Photo Gallery: St. Vincent, Tame Impala, and More Play Governors Ball 2015

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This weekend saw the return of what’s becoming a traditional way for white 20-somethings in NYC to welcome the summer: shuffling through endless crowds in the hope of seeing something to justify the effort of attending, getting very drunk in the process, and hoping it doesn’t rain. But enough about Bushwick Open Studios; Governors Ball also happened, and… Read More

Photo credit: Laura Beth Reese

Intimate Portraits of Ex-Lovers in Bed

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Some couples break up to make up, but Boston-based artist Laura Beth Reese breaks up (not intentionally, of course) and photographs. “Her work is autobiographical: she photographs people that occupy her life one way or another, for better or worse,” an artist statement informs us — and that couldn’t be more evident than in the photo series Ex-Boyfriends, which we first spotted on Illusion. The portraits of former lovers are intimate and vulnerable with a hint of awkwardness. The old beaus recline on a bed with tousled hair, half-dressed. The history of these relationships is evident in the gaze of the exes — proving that sometimes the past never leaves us completely.
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