Your Weekly TV News Roundup: ‘Homeland’ Teases Season 4, FXX Plans World Domination With ‘Simpsons’ Site

The television world moves so fast that by the time you learn of a show’s premiere, it could already be canceled. It’s hard to keep track of the constant stream of television news, so Flavorwire is here to provide a weekly roundup of the most exciting — and baffling — casting and development updates. This week, HBO’s Westworld gets its leads, The CW cancels its new comedies, and FXX teases its all-Simpsons website. … Read More

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WGN America’s Atomic-Era Drama ‘Manhattan’ Is Historical TV Done Right

Let’s play a game. Think about what Mad Men does well. By watching the story of Don Draper, we’re watching a story about America — the show does an excellent job of using one man’s experience to show us an extraordinary period of change in American history. Now imagine that you want to write your own Mad Men. What time in American history proves to be a microcosm of the country? … Read More

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‘Lucy,’ ‘Nikita,’ and the State of the Female Action Movie

There’s a scene about halfway into Luc Besson’s Lucy, which finds Scarlett Johansson’s title character striding down a luxury hotel hallway in slow-motion, a gun in each hand, as the operatic music favored by the film’s supervillian swells on the soundtrack. It’s a scene you’ve seen in a million other disposable action movies, but it packs a giddy, sneaky punch here, and not just because it’s well directed by Besson (though it is), or because Johansson is so exuberantly sexy (though she is). The scene works, jumps from the screen and bounces around the auditorium, because the sight of a tough female action hero is still rare enough to give the audience an extra jolt. Say what you will about Lucy, which is an absurdly silly and sometimes aggressively stupid movie, but it’s at least interested in showing us something new. … Read More

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Flavorwire Author Club: Nora Ephron’s Guide to Dealing With Heartbreak Through ‘Heartburn’

I didn’t reread Nora Ephron’s only novel, Heartburn, last summer when my fiancé broke off our engagement, leaving me to move out of his Brooklyn apartment and onto a friend’s couch on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. I did, however, watch the movie it’s based on, and for which Ephron wrote the screenplay, several times. It’s a near-perfect film, with Meryl Streep as Rachel Samstat, who is blindsided while several months pregnant when she discovers that her husband, Mark Feldman (played by Jack Nicholson), is in love with another woman. Ephron herself joked about the film years later at Meryl Streep’s AFI Lifetime Achievement tribute. “I highly recommend Meryl Streep play you,” she quipped. “If your husband is cheating on you with a carhop, get Meryl to play you. You will feel much better. If you get rear-ended in a parking lot, have Meryl Streep play you. If the dingo eats your baby, call Meryl.” … Read More

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What If ‘Boyhood’ Were ‘Girlhood’? A Thought Experiment

“Fuck Boyhood, where’s Girlhood?” Critical responses to Richard Linklater’s new film have been rhapsodic, to the extent that The Guardian recently ran a piece analyzing its perfect Rotten Tomatoes rating (which has since slipped to 99 percent, along with the deeply flawed likes of The Godfather, Part II). And yet, both on social media and in private conversations, I’ve heard versions of this question posed seriously and jokingly and in ways best described as “kidding/not kidding.” I’ve even said something like it once or twice myself, mostly poking fun at my own tendencies toward feminist bean-counting. … Read More

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Why Weird Al Yankovic, the Anti-Troll, Is More Relevant Than Ever

When it comes to chronicling pop music trends, Weird Al is as dependable as Now That’s What I Call Music! compilations. Every few years, Yankovic offers up new parodies that pack a light enough punch that even grandmothers and children under the age of ten can appreciate the humor. But it was not until this week, 31 years and 14 albums into his career, that Weird Al scored his first No. 1 album on the Billboard 200 chart. … Read More

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Notes on a Budding Public Intellectual: An Excerpt From Daniel Schreiber’s Susan Sontag Biography

The first biography to be published after the writer and public intellectual’s death in 2004, Daniel Schreiber’s Susan Sontag has been translated from German into English, for release in America by Northwestern University Press, at a time when its subject’s star is the brightest it’s been since her passing. With her legacy well established, a new generation of writers is looking to Sontag as the gold standard for cultural criticism. … Read More

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Is Pornhub the New iTunes? Links You Need to See

While Coolio signs a deal to release all his music through Pornhub – and in return gets to use the resources of Pornhub’s female “talent” – Pharrell releases a video “empowering” women… by having them dance for him. Those items and more, in today’s links! … Read More

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Staff Picks: Flavorwire’s Favorite Cultural Things This Week

Need a great book to read, album to listen to, or TV show to get hooked on? The Flavorwire team is here to help: in this weekly feature, our editorial staffers recommend the cultural object or experience they’ve enjoyed most in the past seven days. Click through for our picks, and tell us what you’ve been loving in the comments. … Read More

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Flavorpill & Heineken Dare You to Open Your City

Presented by Heineken

This summer, Heineken and Flavorpill are rewarding bold moves and inquisitive souls. All you have to do is enter your phone number at routineinterruptions.com. Answer the call (if and when it comes), and your risk will be rewarded in the form of some seriously awesome experiences. Open your city, and we’ll open your world. … Read More

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