The Best TV Show Tie-In Websites

Fake websites have been a long-running joke on television shows. Usually, these sites are just quickly mentioned, like... Read More
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The Enduring Legacy of ‘Election’s’ Tracy Flick and “Who the Fuck Does She Think She Is?” Women

In the 2008 Democratic Primary race, the roles were just as clear as they were in Alexander Payne’s excellent 1999 satire Election: charismatic newcomer Barack Obama was Paul Metzler, and Hillary Clinton was the perky yet terrifying Tracy Flick. There was no doubt that the latter had put in the years necessary for the role, but something about her down-to-business ways did not sit right with the voters. They opted for change instead of experience, for the ex-quarterback with new ideas and a disregard for how things have been done in the past because, well, he hadn’t been adhering to the rules for very long before he was in the position to break them. … Read More

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Lily Allen’s “Sheezus”: Feminist Anthem or Controversy-Courting Gimmick?

Lily Allen has proven herself to be a complicated artist in recent months. First there was her comeback single, “Hard Out Here,” which she dropped, along with a video, to much surprise. I immediately applauded the song itself, even enjoying aspects of the cheeky video, which seemed to reinforce what I loved about Allen when she released her debut in 2006. But the video caused controversy; was it making a statement about the current state of pop music, particularly the treatment of women within the genre, without recognizing the racist undertone in the way it depicted women of color twerking behind Allen? Months after the “Hard Out Here” controversy has died down, Allen has released the video for “Sheezus,” the title track of her new album, and it’s likely to cause a similar sort of debate.  … Read More

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Flavorwire Exclusive: “The Last Unmarried Person in America” by Ellen Willis

It’s a little chilling to imagine that nearly 30 years after Ellen Willis published “The Last Unmarried Person in America” in the Village Voice, the piece might have some readers rushing to find out whether something called the “National Family Security Act” was actually ever in the cards. Sitting nicely between political satire and dystopian fiction, it’s one of the most interesting selections in The Essential Ellen Willis, the new collection of the late cultural critic’s most important work. … Read More

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‘Fargo’ Season 1 Episode 2 Recap: “The Rooster Prince”

“Sometimes there is more than one right thing,” Gus Grimly tells his young daughter Greta in “The Rooster Prince.” Greta has a simplistic, black-and-white view of the world. If her father, a police officer, saw somebody doing something wrong, wouldn’t he stop them? Isn’t that the only right thing to do in that situation? It’s not, as Greta will eventually learn when she’s older and as Gus found out at the end of last week’s premiere. … Read More

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Electric Daisy Festival Sets New Safety Standards: Links You Need to See

Once again, there is talk of a Goonies II brewing, so it’s only fair we tap in to some Goonies nostalgia in today’s links. … Read More

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What Happened to Martha Gellhorn’s Lost Debut Novel?

Of all the conflicts that took place throughout the 20th century, none has been as romanticized as the Spanish Civil War, which pitted the supporters of the democratically elected Spanish Republic against the General Francisco Franco-led nationalists, who were backed by Nazi Germany and fascist Italy. The war fought for freedom with “trenches full of poets,” as The Clash sang in “Spanish Bombs,” was one that saw over 500,000 causalities, but amid a century filled with the crudeness and brutality of the First World War, the senseless atrocities inflicted on millions of innocent people during the Second World War, and America’s misguided war in Vietnam, the Spanish Civil War, the people who fought in it, and their reasons are often an afterthought. … Read More

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Bob Colacello’s Photos of Andy Warhol Hanging Out With His Cool Friends

Bob Colacello’s Holy Terror: Andy Warhol Close Up (rereleased this spring) is widely regarded as the essential look at life inside the Warhol parade. Colacello, the editor of Interview magazine from 1971 to 1983, had incredible access as Warhol’s employee, collaborator, and colleague. It makes for an entertaining, hilarious book, and it’s a multimedia project: Stephen Kasher Gallery in Manhattan is currently running an exhibit of Colacello’s beautiful black-and-white photos from Inside Warhol’s World. Here are some of our faves, and if you’re in New York City, you have until May 24 to check out the full range of Colacello’s work. … Read More

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The Skeptic’s Guide to Elizabeth Gilbert

Elizabeth Gilbert is a great writer who has been, in some ways, cursed with great success. Her 2006 book Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman’s Search for Everything Across Italy, India, and Indonesia was such a raging, zeitgeist-capturing forever-on-the-list bestseller that it, paradoxically, practically erased her decade’s worth of work as an author that could do anything: write the hell out of a short story, books in fiction or nonfiction, and a haunting magazine feature that stays with the reader. Eat, Pray, Love turned Gilbert into “Elizabeth Gilbert” the self-help brand, a woman with a viral TED Talk and the approval of Oprah. And she still has it — she’ll be one of the “life trailblazer” speakers on Oprah’s eight-city “The Life You Want Empowerment Tour” in the fall. … Read More

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Gabriel García Márquez on Shakira and 5 Other Authors’ Fascinating Rock Star Profiles

“The most amazing thing about the Shakira phenomenon is the craze that has gripped masses of children.” The late Gabriel García Márquez wrote that in his 2002 profile on Shakira for The Guardian. Even when covering one of the biggest pop stars in the world, the Nobel Prize winner’s music writing doesn’t rank anywhere near his classics like One Hundred Years of Solitude or Love in the Time of Cholera, but it does earn a spot alongside a few of our other favorite rock star/writer pairings. … Read More

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Women Should Be Next on Aaron Sorkin’s Apology List

In a rare moment of humility this week, Aaron Sorkin apologized… sort of. He said a few words to journalists who do the kind of work he portrays on The Newsroom, in an attempt to smooth over any misunderstandings about how he portrays their profession. … Read More

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