‘Parenthood’ Series Finale Recap: “May God Bless and Keep You Always”

Last night, after six seasons, TV’s most emotional drama ended with a grand parade of happy endings. Some were more likely than others, but the Parenthood series finale was a time for the kind of crocodile tears that come when someone you love — someone good — gets what is deserved. From the Luncheonette thriving through Adam’s departure to Chambers Academy financially supporting both Adam and Kristina, the “Well, wait, how does that add up?” logic lingering around many of the brash decisions made in the series finale was easy enough to ignore. That’s sort of always been the deal with Parenthood: sometimes, the solutions to the Bravermans’ messy problems seem to work a little too well, so much so that it’s easy to forget that Zeek and Camille were dealing with infidelity a few years ago, that Kristina beat cancer pretty recently, and that Amber went from troubled teen to brave young mother kind of fast. … Read More

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Continuing On, Despite Pandora’s Shameful Top 10 Songs: Links You Need to See

The “general population” can be a baffling bunch. Sometimes, no matter how much you try to conform to and to understand the greater organism that is our world, it sends baffling messages your way, and you find yourself perpetually and irrevocably alienated. For example, Buzzfeed recently asked Pandora to supply them with their top-ten thumbs-upped songs of all (Pandora’s) time. The results were staggeringly off-putting, and may lead you to wonder, while walking down the street, buying a salad — whatever it is you “people” do in public — who among the sea of anonymous assholes is contributing their virtual thumbs to what seems to be becoming a problem of global proportions. Indeed, we’re seeing a relentless waste of thumbs. For Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believing” is the number one thumbs-upped song, and it’s closely followed by Gotye’s “Somebody that I Used to Know,” Maroon 5’s “She Will Be Loved” and The Fray’s “How to Save a Life.”  … Read More

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Your Weekly TV News Roundup: ‘Supergirl’ Casts Its Jimmy Olsen, ‘Togetherness’ Renewed

The television world moves so fast that by the time you learn of a show’s premiere, it could already be canceled. It’s hard to keep track of the constant stream of television news, so Flavorwire is here to provide a weekly roundup of the most exciting — and baffling — casting and development updates. This week: A whole batch of new pilots to hate, Supergirl casting news, and a Togetherness renewal. … Read More

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Fascinating, Evocative New Images of New York’s Abandoned Spaces

A few months ago, we ran some images from NYC photographer Will Ellis’s blog Abandoned NYC, which has for the last few years documented the corners of the city you never see — abandoned buildings, inaccessible islands, and various other fascinatingly atmospheric locales. Happily, Ellis has landed a book deal for his photos — Abandoned NYC, the book, is out this week and available here. (It’ll also be in stores and available via online retailers.) To celebrate, Ellis was kind enough to share a few previously unseen images with us — click through to check them out. … Read More

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How to Get Away With Pop Music Plagiarism

This week, the big topic of conversation among music fans is whether the chorus of Sam Smith’s “Stay With Me” sounds enough like Tom Petty’s 1989 hit “Won’t Back Down” to warrant the 12.5 percent songwriting credit recently awarded to Petty and his co-writer, Jeff Lynne. Copyright infringement as it applies to songwriting plagiarism goes beyond merely how a song sounds, and if a songwriter even intended to copy the work of another. The field has become more and more litigious in recent decades, and to an outsider, the situation can look a bit creatively limiting. Sometimes people do go to court and win, but many big cases settle out of court on the basis of subconscious plagiarism. What a scary landscape to live in as a musician — being responsible for inadvertently copying someone else’s work you’ve never even heard. … Read More

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Stop Freaking Out About ‘Newsweek’s’ Silicon Valley Cover and Read the Story It’s Advertising

Behind every provocative magazine cover lies an article whose worth we can only determine by actually reading it. Newsweek’s cursor-lifting “upskirt” cover appeared last night, and initial outrage poured forth on Twitter, as it so often does. Then the article, “What Silicon Valley Thinks of Women,” was published. And it became clear, to me at least, that the cover was an extremely accurate representation of the content. Was it unnecessarily titillating, too? Maybe, but if it brought readers in, I think it did its job. … Read More

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Michelle Tea’s ‘How to Grow Up’ Is an Honest Memoir About the Writing Life

Michelle Tea has always been a fearless and honest writer with manifold talents — from gritty memoirs like The Chelsea Whistle to young adult books like Rose of No Man’s Land, her work has been characterized by its freedom and daring. It’s also characterized by its commitment to showing the reality of women’s lives in many forms, illuminating what the queer community in San Francisco is like for a young, passionate person. … Read More

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‘Parenthood’ Cast Members’ Cry-Acting, Ranked

Even if you have never seen Parenthood, the great and critically acclaimed family drama on NBC, you are probably still aware of how much it makes viewers cry. It’s all we can talk about! Parenthood is basically a master class in emotional manipulation, setting up storylines each week just to knock viewers down into a sobbing spiral. The characters on the show do plenty of crying themselves, which means the actors have to be skilled in the art of spontaneously producing tears. In celebration (and premature mourning) of tonight’s series finale, here are the top ten best crying actors on Parenthood. … Read More

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Jonathan Chait and Anita Sarkeesian: What It Really Means to Be Silenced

By now, it’s safe to assume that everyone who cares about “political correctness” — pro, anti, or “it’s complicated” — has not only absorbed Jonathan Chait’s New York magazine cover story on the topic, but read plenty of rebuttals to its arguments. Flavorwire’s Judy Berman took a polite chainsaw to Chait’s piece a couple of days back, and I don’t have a lot to add to what she said. But at this point, it’s worth taking a look at how Chait’s reacted to criticism of his essay: with, for the most part, the perception that people are focusing on him and his identity, rather than his arguments. … Read More

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Girl Canon: 50 Essential Books About the Female Experience

Everyone knows that, statistically at least, girls read more than boys. But the classic, canonical growing-up books, at least in American culture, tend to represent the male experience — I’m thinking On the Road, The Catcher in the Rye, everything ever written by Bret Easton Ellis or Michael Chabon — and while these are great books, suitable for boys or girls, the question remains: where are the books for girls to grow up on? Well, they’re definitely out there, if perhaps assigned less often in schools to readers of both genders. And so I propose a Girl Canon, populated by books not necessarily for girls but which investigate, address, or represent the female experience in some essential… Read More

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