Peter Capaldi Goes Victorian in New ‘Doctor Who’ Season 9 Photos

If you’re an ardent Doctor Who fan — or even just sort of casually interested in the venerable British sci-fi series — you’re probably rather excited at the prospect of seeing Malcolm Tucker as the 12th incarnation of the Doctor. By the looks of these photos, which were released by BBC America earlier this morning in advance of Saturday’s Season 8 premiere, he’ll be joined by old friends and foes alike — notably, it seems that the Paternoster gang will feature again, which is always a welcome throwback to the earliest days of the series. Beyond that, there’s not a great deal to be gleaned, but still, just imagine Peter Capaldi denouncing his foes as being as useless as marzipan dildos, and giggle heartily. … Read More

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25 Great Pieces of Life Advice From Literature

Everyone could use a bit of advice now and then. But what if you’re the type who eschews all human contact and prefers to converse only with characters in your books? Well, er, then even they might not be able to help you. All kidding aside, as any avid reader will know, many of the great works of literature are filled with wisdom, which you could do worse than to take to heart — especially in these back-to-school weeks, a time when a little extra advice can always help. Here, you’ll find a few nuggets of humanhood as doled out by literary (read: fictional!) characters who know a thing or… Read More

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So Bad It’s Good: ‘Howard the Duck,’ the Marvel Movie We’d All Like to Forget

Bad movies are not a simple matter. There are nearly as many categories of terrible movies as there are for great ones: there are films that are insultingly stupid (Batman & Robin), unintentionally funny (The Room), unintentionally, painfully unfunny (White Chicks), so bad they’re depressing (Transformers), and so on. But the most rewarding terrible movies are those we know as “so bad they’re good” — entertaining in their sheer incompetence, best braved in numbers, where the ham-fisted dramatics and tin-eared dialogue become fodder for years of random quotes and inside jokes. And in this spirit, Flavorwire brings you the latest installment in our monthly So Bad It’s Good series: Howard the Duck, the first big-screen adaptation of a Marvel comic book, which makes their subsequent films seem like the flowers that bloom beneath a heavy load of dense fertilizer. … Read More

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‘A Young Doctor’s Notebook’ Season 2 Unites Harry Potter and Don Draper in a Black-hearted Character Study

A Young Doctor’s Notebook is a show that risks being overwhelmed by its own premise. The SparkNotes version: Harry Potter and Don Draper! Harry Potter and Don Draper, playing the same person! Harry Potter and Don Draper, playing the same person, based — sort of — on Mikhail Bulgakov! The high-profile casting and source material, however, belie the series’ stakes (small) and its scope (smaller). Such cognitive dissonance may make A Young Doctors Notebook a disappointment to some, but when taken on its own terms, the show is a brilliant, black-hearted character study that’s only improved in its second four-episode run, which premieres tonight on Ovation. … Read More

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Taylor Swift Announces Her 1980s Pop Album, and Other Takeaways From Her Live Stream

Never one for subtlety, Taylor Swift took some time out from her quest to be every young female celebrity’s BFF to launch her new album with a live-stream “event.” It ended at 5:30 ET this evening (but is now playing on repeat), and here’s what you need to know, in order of importance: … Read More

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Summer 2014 TV’s Biggest Winners and Losers

During the past few months, television has given us so many reasons to ignore the nice summer weather and instead remain planted in front of a TV set — or a computer. Even though the 2013-2014 TV season officially ended in May, there has been no shortage of programs to fill up the DVR. Many of the shows were surprisingly good considering they were relegated to summer months, but, of course, many of them were pretty bad. Here’s a look at some of the biggest winners and losers of the summer television season.  … Read More

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Flavorwire Premiere: Teleman Spins Bauhaus Art Into Playful “Skeleton Dance” Video

The biggest sell on British pop band Teleman may be their style references. Their excellent debut album from earlier this summer, titled Breakfast, was produced by former Suede guitarist Bernard Butler. Their new video for “Skeleton Dance,” which Flavorwire is pleased to premiere below, is influenced by Oskar Schlemmer of the Bauhaus School. Both bring something fresh and endlessly tasteful to Belle & Sebastian-style twee rock. … Read More

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Boomer Audit: Despite the Self-Indulgence and the Clichés, ‘Easy Rider’ Retains Its Pulse

Easy Rider is nothing but trouble. Even the most casual of film fans is aware of its importance; an out-of-left-field critical and commercial smash in the summer of 1969, its unconventional approach, anti-authoritarian themes, and pop soundtrack helped set the table for the “New Hollywood” of the 1970s, and all that came after. Without Easy Rider, there would have been no Last Picture Show or Five Easy Pieces. Jack Nicholson may have never crossed over from screenwriting to screen acting. And the studios, falling to pieces after years of expensive flops, might have taken a good while longer to discover that genre-bending young filmmakers were the key to their survival. Easy Rider’s influence, its value, its consequence are irrefutable — and none of that makes it any easier to sit through. Yet saying so sounds like sneering contrarianism, if not outright trollery. You just can’t win with this one. … Read More

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Debut Novels That Got Huge Advances: Where Are They Now?

Today marks the release of Matthew Thomas’s 640-page debut novel We Are Not Ourselves, a sprawling Irish-American family epic that has been garnering major buzz because of its big price tag: according to Page Six the book “got more than a $1 million advance in North America, and closed a six-figure UK deal at the London Book Fair.” Not too shabby, Matthew Thomas! But the question is: do big advances always herald big books? Here’s a look at a few debut novels that earned huge advances — and how they fared once they made it out into the real world. … Read More

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Introducing Flavorwire’s Boomer Audit Week: Why We Need to Reevaluate Past Generations’ Classics

The 1960s. Dear god. It’s both remarkable and somewhat depressing to think about the continuing prevalence of 1960s mythology today — albums recorded during that decade are regularly presented to us as the Greatest Ever Made, films as the most influential ever shot, and so on. One can’t imagine that in the 1960s, the 1910s were presented as culture’s high watermark. So why the enduring talk of the 1960s today? … Read More

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