Flavorwire Interview: Kim Gottlieb-Walker on Capturing John Carpenter’s Landmark Horror Classics

Her work has taken her from the Free Speech Movement in California and the underground press to the golden age of reggae (capturing Bob Marley) and a Jimi Hendrix interview in 1967 (her candid portraits of the singer are featured in the Hendrix “bible,” Classic Hendrix). But photographer Kim Gottlieb-Walker’s encounters with celebrity weren’t limited to music. She became the set photographer for filmmaker John Carpenter, capturing stills of his iconic genre films — including Halloween, The Fog, Escape from New York, Halloween II, and Christine. Her behind-the-scenes images offer insight into one of cinema’s masters of horror — a maverick artist who has thrilled and chilled us since 1974. The Carpenter photographs are the subject of a newly released book from Titan Books, On Set with John Carpenter. We recently spoke with Gottlieb-Walker about the making of Halloween, being a woman in a male-dominated industry, and the greatest Carpenter film faces. … Read More

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15 Fictional TV Characters’ Pop Culture Halloween Costumes

Many people argue that the magic of Halloween disappears once you’ve grown up, but let’s be honest: dressing up is always fun. Pop culture provides us with endless ideas for Halloween costumes, whether it’s a favorite TV character, the many iterations of Lady Gaga, or some clever take on an Internet meme. And because TV writers are just as informed by media as we are, their fictional television characters will often also end up in pop culture-inspired costumes. From Bob’s Burgers to The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, here are 15 of the best pop culture costumes in television. … Read More

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Flavorwire Premiere: Soft Swells Soundtrack Love On The Run In Their “Floodlights” Video

You can hear California in Tim Williams’ voice. So for those who happen to know a thing or two about surfing, his band’s name — Soft Swells — makes sense (it’s slang for baby waves). Hearing Soft Swells’ music, it makes even more sense. The term “surf rock” can bring to mind The Beach Boys or Link Wray, but there’s a lightness in Soft Swells’ harmony-drenched indie rock that feels more skin to another appropriately named act, Nada Surf. On Soft Swells’ recently released sophomore album, Floodlights, they complicated their sunny songs just a little. The LP’s title track is perfect example of that, and Flavorwire is pleased to premiere its music video below.

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A Brief and Incomplete Survey of New Types of Online Literature

Last week, T Magazine published a game of exquisite corpse featuring a selection of excellent fiction writers, from Jenny Offill and James Patterson to Zadie Smith and Ben Marcus. The game was light and refreshing; the story itself twists into absurdity as some of the authors — notably the insidious R.L. Stine — appear to be pranking their peers and sort of hacking the plot as it grows. I found the form of the story simple but genuinely interesting, so I decided to pool together this chronology (or survey) of recent developments in digital or online literary forms. This is by no means a comprehensive list, nor is it meant to be. (I have, though, included some print projects that derive their form from digital media.) But it could be a starting point for a broader discussion about new literary forms, especially those new types of fiction (and criticism) that are popping up, rapidly, on Twitter and elsewhere. … Read More

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“Amazon Is Hurting America”: NY Times Columnist On Why the Hachette Conflict Goes Way Beyond Books

“Amazon.com, the giant online retailer, has too much power, and it uses that power in ways that hurt America.” Thus begins Monday’s ominously blunt column by New York Times regular and Nobel-prize winner Paul Krugman. Krugman, who covers the economy from a progressive perspective, does not approach the controversial question of Amazon: good or bad? as a an author with a recent book out, nor as a rabid culture consumer (although I did see him at a St. Vincent concert in Brooklyn once; shoutout to Paul Krugman’s music taste!) Instead, he’s writing as a politically-savvy economist who sees a company beginning to get out of control. And Krugman has some important thoughts about what Amazon has become so dangerous — not a monopoly, per se, but rather a monopsony. … Read More

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‘Sleepy Hollow’ Season 2 Episode 5 Recap: “The Weeping Lady”

In “The Weeping Lady,” Tim Mison’s sexy-fine looks finally get the recognition they deserve: Three ladies are all pining/dying for Crane. The first is Caroline, a sharp, present-day woman with an obsession for all things colonial. In fact, the episode opens with Caroline delivering a bunch of handmade goods to Crane before he realizes her romantic intentions. The second is this episode’s titular character, Mary, a woman from Crane’s time who was promised his hand in marriage by her parents. And the third is, of course, Katrina, his loving and spiteful wife. … Read More

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James Blunt Is On Our Side, Admits “You’re Beautiful” Is Annoying: Links You Need to See

With Halloween nearing and everyone guzzling listicles of scary things — essentially having their fears dictated to them — it’s easy to forget the commonplace horrors. For example, while you’ve likely been busy getting your coulrophobia rekindled by American Horror Story, your fear of say, Comic Sans, has probably been relegated to the backseat of your subconscious. Well, I’d like to change that. There’s lots out there to be afraid of, and most of it isn’t bedecked in foam noses and white makeup (though, arguably, Comic Sans would be the actual most horrific thing in the world if it were wearing a clown costume). … Read More

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So Bad It’s Good: Get Possessed by the Boredom of ‘Exorcist II: The Heretic’

Bad movies are not a simple matter. There are nearly as many categories of terrible movies as there are for great ones: there are films that are insultingly stupid (Batman & Robin), unintentionally funny (Birdemic), unintentionally, painfully unfunny (White Chicks), so bad they’re depressing (Transformers), and so on. But the most rewarding terrible movies are those we know as “so bad they’re good” — entertaining in their sheer incompetence, best braved in numbers, where the ham-fisted dramatics and tin-eared dialogue become fodder for years of random quotes and inside jokes. And in this spirit, Flavorwire brings you the latest installment in our monthly So Bad It’s Good feature, and a special Halloween edition, no less: John Boorman’s notorious 1977 sequel Exorcist II: The Heretic. … Read More

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A Crash Course in Sleater-Kinney, So You Can Get Excited About Their Reunion

How’s your Monday going? Could it benefit from some rad tunes that give you power in every fiber of your being? Are you scared yet? Well, you shouldn’t be, because today is a great day. Today, Sleater-Kinney announced their reunion, and of course they did it in a we-don’t-fuck-around manner that mirrors their artistic approach. (Lest you need reminding that “doing it right” is a frustratingly rare tactic for band reunions amidst these “Oh, Coachella will pay us how much to reunite?” reconciliations). There will be a big tour, there will be a new album (No Cities to Love, out January 20 via Sub Pop), and there will be joy. Oh yeah, and there’s a new single, “Bury Our Friends,” which Sleater-Kinney hid in their new vinyl box set, Start Together (out tomorrow). As if you didn’t already think they were clever already… or maybe you didn’t. Maybe you have no idea. Allow me to just say, I am excited for the very moment when you discover that. Sleater-Kinney is not generally a band that offers up diminishing returns if you invest in them. … Read More

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How Kurosawa’s ‘Yojimbo’ Became Leone’s ‘Fistful of Dollars’

His name might not mean much to Joe Moviegoer, but among a certain kind of cinephile, Stephen Prince is a legend. Others may know their Kurosawa, but Prince wrote a brilliant deep-dive on the great Japanese director’s films (The Warrior’s Camera: The Cinema of Akira Kurosawa), although his movie-geek street cred is mostly due to his Criterion Collection audio commentaries, which appear on the DVDs and Blu-rays for pretty much every Kurosawa film they’ve released–including Yojimbo, which was the one that brought us together. Last weekend, I had the honor of talking to Prince about Yojimbo at the Tallgrass Film Festival in Wichita, Kansas (one of our favorite under-the-radar film fests). Specifically, we discussed the link between that film and its unofficial remake, A Fistful of Dollars (which also screened at the fest). … Read More

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