Suggested Storylines for Lady Gaga’s ‘American Horror Story: Hotel’

It was announced this week that Lady Gaga would be starring in the fifth season of Ryan Murphy’s American Horror Story, subtitled Hotel. The show has famously skirted controversy with its rash, nuanced depictions of race, mental handicaps, rape, homosexuality, dwarfism, civil rights, and ageism in entertainment. With Lady Gaga entering the fray, Murphy and co-creator Brad Falchuk are sure to push the envelope even further. … Read More

  • 0

The Question of Ziplessness: Why ‘Secretary’ Is a More Appealing Depiction of BDSM Than ‘Fifty Shades of Grey’

It is, more than anything else, a testament to the scarcity of nontraditional love stories on film that Fifty Shades of Grey is so often compared to Secretary. While the former is a new, record-breaking international blockbuster that metastasized out of history’s most bankable foray into erotic fan-fiction, the latter is an independent film based on a Mary Gaitskill story. Secretary cost just $4 million to make, and its release in 2002 didn’t dominate the cultural conversation so much as inspire a frisson among cinephiles, kink enthusiasts, and anyone else who sensed the promise of a scenario in which James Spader ordered Maggie Gyllenhaal to step into his office. … Read More

  • 0

Cool Girls Do It Better: On Kim Gordon’s Juicy, Modest Memoir, ‘Girl in a Band’

In the final paragraph of her memoir, Girl in a Band, Kim Gordon details a makeout session with a man who is most certainly not Thurston Moore. Emergency brake pulled, the two sat in front of a house on a hill that Gordon had rented in LA for several weeks last year while getting back to her visual art roots in a post-Sonic Youth, post-Thurston world. The anecdote starts kind of bumpy because it is apropos of nothing, but it ends somewhere fitting — hopeful, even. “I know: it sounds like I’m someone else entirely now,” she writes after pulling away from this man’s “full-on grope” for reasons of practicality, “and I guess I am.” … Read More

  • 0

Flavorwire Exclusive: A Lesson on Art School by Chris Kraus

The work of Chris Kraus — the American novelist, critic or fictocritic, professor of film, filmmaker, and editor — is irreducible to a single mode of artistic output. Nevertheless, in recent years, Kraus has been known more in her capacity as “the art world’s favorite fiction writer,” or, as  Kate Zambreno put it, as a writer who “radicalized a vernacular criticism that involves the self” and “[is] influential in re-innovating the idea of the nonfiction novel.” In whatever mode, Kraus draws fearlessly from her life as an artist. In the below short excerpt, taken from Phaidon’s new Akademie X: Lessons in Art + Life, Kraus does the same, effortlessly combining biography and criticism to deliver a sui generis lesson on art school. Included at the bottom is Kraus’ selection of reading, viewing, and other assignments for would-be students. … Read More

  • 0

‘Broad City’ Season 2 Episode 7: “Citizen Ship”

While I generally watch Broad City for the absurd but relatable humor, there’s a lot to be said about how it’s also solidly put together in the more technical terms (the three-act structure, balance between plots and characters, inspired cinematography and direction) and when it comes to writing, such as character development which is really on display in “Citizen Ship.” It’s an episode that brings in two bit players — Bevers and Jaime — and gives them both an added depth (certainly a bit more depth that we’ve previously seen with Bevers) while also providing some ace Abbi and Ilana moments. … Read More

  • 0

Greek God Video Games and Celebrity Satire: Links You Need to See

In video games, you’re probably used to battling with inane, unimposing creatures named Jigglypuff, steroid-stuffed turtles named Bowser, more inane, unimposing creatures named Wigglytuff,  — okay, it’s clear I haven’t played many video games. But even major gamers are probably used to battling silly fictitious characters cooked up by video game companies more than they’re accustomed to battling, say, Greek Gods. However, a new video game called Apotheon gives users the chance to truly test their mettle by battling the likes of Poseidon, Zeus, Apollo, and some nice, assorted cyclopses — all the while stuck in the world of a seemingly never-ending Grecian Urn. Whether you’re into ancient Greek art or simply really into the idea of lashing out at your Classics education by beating up some Greek Gods, Apotheon is worth checking out. … Read More

  • 0

Staff Picks: Screaming Females, Bolaño, and Ned Beauman

Need a great book to read, album to listen to, or TV show to get hooked on? The Flavorwire team is here to help: in this weekly feature, our editorial staffers recommend the cultural object or experience they’ve enjoyed most in the past seven days. Click through for our picks, and tell us what you’ve been loving in the comments. … Read More

  • 0

‘Sex Criminals’ Is the Funny, Sex-Positive, Feminist Comic Series You Should Be Reading

Sex Criminals jokingly bills itself as a classic boy-meets-girl story, and in a way it is. Suzie and Jon meet at a party and are instantly attracted to each other (partly based on his ability to quote her favorite book, Lolita, but that small fact is easy to ignore). They hook up, as 20-somethings are wont to do, but then discover that they each have a… thing: When they orgasm, time stops. No, it doesn’t metaphorically stop, the way it would in the flowery language of romance novels — it literally stops, allowing Suzie and Jon to wander around a frozen world. What they each previously believed was a superpower unique him or her is now a shared oddity, bringing them closer together — “alone together” is a recurring motif — but also allowing them to go on a bank-robbing spree. See: Classic story.  … Read More

  • 0

How I (Sort Of) Replaced Twitter With a Diary

Crusty intellectual types are fond of expressing disgust with what they see as social media’s corrosive effect on our culture of Letters. Recently, we heard about it from deposed New Republic sage Leon Wieseltier in a mostly maddeningly opaque New York Times Book Review cover essay about disruption. “As the frequency of expression grows, the force of expression diminishes: Digital expectations of alacrity and terseness confer the highest prestige upon the twittering cacophony of one-liners and promotional announcements,” he wrote. “It was always the case that all things must pass, but this is ridiculous.” (The latter sentence would fit fabulously in a tweet, I thought ashamedly.) … Read More

  • 0

From ‘Bagboy’ to “Too Many Cooks,” Twisted Sitcom Parodies Are Becoming Adult Swim’s Sweet Spot

A few months ago, Adult Swim aired “Too Many Cooks,” a brilliant, searing, and absolutely hilarious send-up of sitcoms, and particularly the family-friendly ABC TGIF staples of the ’90s. The 11-minute video surprised and shocked viewers, taking a dark turn from nostalgic tribute to twisted slasher flick, all while the same upbeat, cheesy theme music played. “Too Many Cooks” quickly became a huge viral hit for the network. While we already knew that there was a big market for nostalgic sitcom parodies, Adult Swim has proved that the best parodies are of the darker and weirder variety, ones that don’t elicit warm and fuzzy feelings but instead go for real laughs and even provide insight on why we’re so attracted to these cheesy programs in the first place. … Read More

  • 0
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 14,471 other followers