Dating Advice From Classic Non-Jane Austen Literature

This week, Melville House released The Jane Austen Rules: A Classic Guide to Modern Love by scholar Sinéad Murphy. It’s a dating advice book culled from the Austen oeuvre, with chapters entitled things like “Dress Up,” “Find a Man, Not a Guy,” and “Be Quite Independent.”

This witty, brief new guide is part of an “Austen advice” mini empire, coming on the heels of Elizabeth Kantor’s rather conservative The Jane Austen Guide to Happily Ever After and William Deresiewicz’s A Jane Austen Education and many other books of similar intent. … Read More

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Your Weekly TV News Roundup: Christina Hendricks Joins Comedy Central Sitcom, ‘Top of the Lake’ Gets Season 2

The television world moves so fast that by the time you learn of a show’s premiere, it could already be canceled. It’s hard to keep track of the constant stream of television news, so Flavorwire is here to provide a weekly roundup of the most exciting — and baffling — casting and development updates. This week: Christina Hendricks joins the comedy American Period, Manhattan and Top of the Lake get Season 2 renewals, and truTV gets stoned.  … Read More

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Dave Grohl Sets His Rock Savior Schtick Aside for Solid Storytelling in HBO’s ‘Sonic Highways’

Forty minutes into the first episode of Dave Grohl’s eight-part HBO docuseries, Foo Fighters: Sonic Highways, he starts singing out a heavy baritone guitar part to Cheap Trick’s Rick Nielsen in the most dramatic of manners, waving his hands like a marching band conductor. (Grohl, it should be noted, was just seen wearing a T-shirt with Nielsen’s face on it.) He breaks eye contact with the underrated guitar great just twice in the ten-second exchange, instead looking right at the camera as if to make sure there was footage of him directing yet another one of rock’s legends. … Read More

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Flavorwire Premiere: Soft Vision’s D.H. Lawrence-Inspired “Rocking Horse Winner”

Last month, Austin drone-pop duo Soft Vision released a striking 7″ called “Feel It Coming On”; its B-side was a song called “Willy Loman,” named for the protagonist of Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman. Now the harmonious synth act, comprised of Kelly Winchester and Bradley Barr, offers up the opening track to their self-titled debut EP, out next week on Acoustic Division’s new pop counterpart, Hi-Definition. It, too, finds its inspiration in one of 20th-century literature’s famous working-class families: D.H. Lawrence’s 1926 short story “The Rocking-Horse Winner.” Flavorwire is pleased to premiere the song, below.

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Claudia Rankine’s ‘Citizen’ Should Win the National Book Award for Poetry

“I feel most colored when I am thrown against a sharp white background.”
—Zora Neale Hurston 

The cover of Claudia Rankine’s Citizen: An American Lyric throws the hood of a sweatshirt against a sharp white background. The hood is threadbare; its symbolic weight is considerable: it immediately brings to mind images of young black life and its execution, as well as the deliberate, systematic imprisonment of millions of black citizens. And juxtaposed with the uppercased title — CITIZEN — this hood, torn from its body, is shot through with consequence: it becomes a metaphorical citizen, with alienable rights, ripped from the body politic and hanged — in a gallery. As a political maneuver that fronts a book of poetry, the placement of the hood beams with the contradictions of our historical moment — Trayvon Martin wears a hoodie and is ruthlessly murdered; Mark Zuckerberg wears a hoodie to the launch of his IPO and earns a billion dollars. So it’s all the more shocking when you realize that the hood is actually an artwork (“In the Hood”) by David Hammons from 1993, exhibited one year after the LA riots. … Read More

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Hey, John Grisham: Looking at Child Pornography Is Not a Victimless Crime

We nearly got through an entire week without a privileged old asshole making a fool of himself, but then John Grisham came along and spoiled everything. Specifically, he gave an interview to the Daily Telegraph in England, wherein he took the opportunity to expound on how he thinks it’s all wrong to lock up old white men who just happen to enjoy watching some child pornography when they get home drunk. He complained that, “We have prisons now filled with guys my age. Sixty-year-old white men in prison who’ve never harmed anybody, would never touch a child,” and cited the example of a friend who “went to a website… labeled, 16-year-old wannabe hookers, or something… [and] downloaded some stuff. It was 16-year-old girls who looked 30. You know, they were all dressed up and whatever. He shouldn’t have done it, it was stupid. But it wasn’t 10-year-old boys and he didn’t touch anything… [But] he went to prison for three years.” This, according to John Grisham, is a Bad Thing. Dear god. Where to begin? … Read More

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“Monty Python Mixed With Anger”: Bob Odenkirk on His Funny Book ‘A Load of Hooey’

In his new McSweeney’s book A Load of Hooey, comedy genius Bob Odenkirk gives you the giggles with a series of bite-sized poems, essays, and stories that are gleefully absurd and very, very funny. There are one-star Internet reviews (on the Bible: “the only magic power the Jesus character had for me was the power to conquer insomnia!!”), silly poetry (“I Found a Jackson Pollock!”), and famous quotes and important advice (“So You Want to Get a Tattoo!”: Step 3: Do Not Be Drunk and in a Hurry). … Read More

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Dear White People: Go See ‘Dear White People’

Justin Simien’s Dear White People is a dagger-sharp satire, a film filled end-to-end with tiny sticks of dynamite, each lit carefully with a gleeful smirk. If such violent metaphors contradict the generally tongue-in-cheek tone, it speaks mostly to the combustible quality of the topics here; like Network or Putney Swope, it feels dangerous, sparked by the charge of secrets told above a whisper. It marks the arrival of Simien (making his feature debut after a handful of shorts) as a major voice; it’s a joyfully confident picture, sophisticated, sexy, and wicked smart. … Read More

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8 Memorable ‘Say Anything’ Parodies on Television

The latest episode of New Girl, “Landline,” ended with a throwaway gag involving Winston’s girlfriend Judy trying to get him back after Nick’s meddling accidentally broke the couple up. Judy shows up at the loft, hoists a boombox over her head, and plays “Levon.” It’s an obvious riff on a scene from 1989’s Say Anything… in which Lloyd Dobler tries to win over his longtime crush Diane Court by holding up a boombox that’s blasting “In Your Eyes” by Peter Gabriel. The scene is pure cheese and earnestness, but it has become iconic. New Girl isn’t the first television show to reference Lloyd’s bumbling display of love, and it definitely won’t be the last. Here are eight other homages (and parodies) of the infamous scene. … Read More

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Olivier Assayas on Post-May 1968 France and Romanticizing Youth Rebellion

Yesterday evening, as part of the Festival Albertine, Olivier Assayas was sort of questioned about his films by a panel consisting of legendary music journalist Greil Marcus, Village Voice film critic Stephanie Zacharek, and screenwriter Larry Gross (We Don’t Live Here Anymore). Mostly, though, he was questioned about the atmosphere surrounding May ’68 — the attempted student revolution in Paris that Assayas didn’t really experience  — by the audience. … Read More

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