Activism

Flavorwire Interview: George Takei on Japanese Internment, Hollywood’s Race Problem, and His Broadway Show ‘Allegiance’

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Based on true events, the Broadway musical Allegiance tells the story of the Kimura family, who, along with 120,000 other Japanese-Americans, are forced to leave their homes and become imprisoned in internment camps after the attack on Pearl Harbor. The show’s star, George Takei, was an internee as a child, and he based his performance on his own family’s stories, the stories of other Japanese-Americans, and the research he has conducted throughout his lifetime.
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“Your Heart Is a Muscle The Size of a Fist”: The Rare Novel That Gets Protest Movements Right

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In 1999 — before the September 11 attacks, the War on Terror, the new anti-war movement,  the Obama campaign, Occupy Wall Street, Black Lives Matter and Bernie Sanders rallies — the focal point of American (and often worldwide) activism was corporate globalization. Protesters targeted sweatshops, labor exploitation, agreements like NAFTA and organizations like the World Trade Organization and the IMF which facilitated the capitalist “race to the bottom” worldwide. The movement was huge, formidable and well-organized, and it won its most decisive PR moment during the 1999 “Battle in Seattle,” a massive convergence of protest groups that effectively shut down a WTO meeting, at least temporarily.
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‘Suffragette’ Is Less Courageous than Its Brick-Throwing Subjects

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Towards the end of Sarah Gavron’s feminist drama Suffragette, a group of feminist activists — who have all been radicalized enough to plant bombs in mailboxes throughout the city of London — stand in a city park, debating whether to similarly bomb the empty country estate of a prominent politician. They’ve been tipped off about the estate by one of their own (Romola Garai) who happens to be married to a government minister. Some think it’s going too far; others (led by Helena Bonham Carter as a militant chemist) think they have no choice but to act in this way, because their cause is being ignored otherwise.
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Op-Ed Pundits Take on Young Activists: Is There No Common Ground?

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Few souls who labor in the media world — from the most app-friendly millennial to the newspaper-clutching boomer, from the most radical critic to the most equivocating pundit — can be unaware at this point of what sometimes happens on Twitter (call it “The Way We Tweet Now”): legitimate critique occasionally whips itself around at ever-increasing speeds until it creates a tornado of overblown outrage and shaming in the name of social justice principles.
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It’s “A Matter of Time” Until New Protests Explode: Author Michael Gould-Wartofsky on Occupy’s Past and Future

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On a freezing Friday afternoon last week, New York’s Zuccotti Park was empty of anything except piles of dirty and frozen snow, a nondescript thoroughfare for cold tourists and bargain shoppers on their way to Century 21. Yet those of us who were regular visitors to the Occupy Wall Street encampment here in 2011 don’t even have to close our eyes to conjure up tents, a kitchen, signs, and hundreds of simultaneous debates happening on every street corner of Liberty Plaza.
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