Ai Weiwei

Offbeat Adventures in San Francisco

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San Francisco feels like a city built specifically for oddballs after offbeat adventures. Starting with the Gold Rush waaaay back in 1849 through the counterculture and hippie movement of the ’60s, to the current tech-sector mass migration, SF has proved to be a hotspot for gung-ho weirdos. What follows is our list of suggestions for modern-day urban explorers with a taste for the left-of-center. They all serve as fantastic support for New Belgium’s wacky Tour de Fat, an annual celebration of “bikes, beer & bemusement,” that lands Saturday, September 13th at Golden Gate Park with headliner Reggie Watts and thousands of local cycling enthusiasts.
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How Ai Weiwei’s Alcatraz Project Changes the Meaning of Prisons as Public Art Sites

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The New York Times makes it seem like a match made in heaven: “Ai Weiwei was one of the most famous prisoners in recent history. Now he’s taking on one of the most infamous prisons of all time” — that prison being Alcatraz, the San Francisco facility that was closed down in 1963 and turned into a famous tourist destination. The piece goes on to report that the renowned Chinese dissident artist chose the location because he is “interested in exploring conditions in which individuals are stripped of basic human rights,” but that Ai is “not thinking about work that will directly connect to my own detention” by the Chinese government in 2011.
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The Year in Film: The 25 Best Movies of 2012

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2012’s finest films reflected ambition, risk, and advocacy. They boldly redrew the maps of genre, freshly examined the creative process, and dared us to contemplate our own mortality. And, in more traditional terms, they made us laugh, and cry, and feel alive. These are the best films of …Read More