Andy Warhol

Photos Capturing Andy Warhol’s Influence on the New York Underground Scene

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“I never wanted to be a painter; I wanted to be a tap dancer,” Andy Warhol once said. “I don’t paint anymore, I gave it up about a year ago and just do movies now. Painting was just a phase I went through.” And Warhol’s influence stretched far beyond the canvas which is the subject of a new exhibition at the Centre Pompidou-Metz (with support from the Andy Warhol Museum), titled Warhol Underground.
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10 Essential One-Film Wonders

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Anthology Film Archives kicked off a new series this week about the underappreciated and forgotten “one-film wonders” — those movies made by filmmakers who “[established] a fully formed cinematic vision with their first full-length credit, only to never make another feature.”
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Vintage Photos of Pop Culture Icons Hitting the Slopes

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Winter is officially here — and depending on your tolerance for the freezing cold, that means it’s also ski season. The snowy slopes feel like one of the few places a celebrity can blend in and evade the cameras, which is why vacationing at the most exclusive resorts around the world has been a decades-long pastime for the fabulous and wealthy. We also imagine the humbling act of balancing two feet atop icy hills gives them an odd thrill. In the spirit of the season, we’ve collected some fantastic photos of pop culture icons hitting the slopes that will hopefully inspire you to strap on a pair of skis. Enjoy the vintage fashions and stunning surroundings, below.
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Fascinating Photos That Capture Famous Artists’ Friendships

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French photographer Lucien Clergue, who penned the autobiography Picasso My Friend, passed away this month. “I had a good fortune to meet Pablo Picasso at a bullring. I had stopped playing violin, and for the lack of funds I could not go to school in Paris. I started taking photographs with different cameras owned by a man close to my home,” Clergue wrote. “Picasso signed one of the print, not my best, but now it is the most expensive. When I reached the age of 20 I was still working in a factory, but I was taking photographs of five children dressed with clothes designed by me [inspired by Picasso’s circus paintings]. I was trying to make Picasso happy: he had said at the bullring, ‘I want to see more prints.’” Their relationship lasted until Picasso’s death in 1973, and that close friendship is revealed in photos of the artists together and Clergue’s portraits of the painter in his studio. Inspired by Clergue, we gathered other photos of famous artist …Read More

Andy Warhol’s Lost Films Find a Voice in Bradford Cox, Dean Wareham, and More

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Watching a drag queen and a James Dean-looking fella make out over a hamburger while Bradford Cox live-soundtracks it was not quite what I had pictured when I heard about Exposed: Songs for Unseen Warhol Films. The Brooklyn Academy of Music event, which opened Thursday night and runs through Saturday (November 8), seemed like a solution the confusion I had felt while watching Andy Warhol’s short films in isolation at the art icon’s Pittsburgh museum a few years back: I wasn’t sure exactly how to feel about the home movies without musical cues swaying me one way or another. There’s no one way to read Warhol’s work, but with the guidance of five experimental musicians — Cox, Television’s Tom Verlaine, Suicide’s Martin Rev, Eleanor Friedberger, and the program’s musical curator, Dean Wareham — the 15 never-before-seen short films selected for Exposed felt far more powerful than they would have on their own. Created for the Exposed program (which showed in Pittsburgh and Los Angeles last month), these 15 songs each highlight different elements of Warhol’s  work, ranging from the vulgarity of both overt sexuality and commercialism to the vulnerability of being on display.
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Water Gets a Street Art Makeover

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Perrier® sparkling natural mineral water has a long history of collaborating with renowned artists, from Warhol to Dali, and now it has turned to three internationally acclaimed street artists to re-imagine their iconic green water bottles and cans. JonOne (NYC/Paris), enhanced the glass bottle with bold, abstract designs; Sasu (Tokyo) adorned the plastic bottle with colorful geometrics; while Kobra (São Paulo) enriched the slim can with dynamic patterns. Check out all the #StreetArtbyPerrier bottles now, for a limited time. Which is your fave?

Check out behind-the-scenes video from the three artists, as well as some pics of their other work, to get an idea of the talent behind these exciting, limited-edition looks.
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50 Cultural Icons on What They Were Like as Teenagers

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It’s hard out there for a teenager. It’s even kind of hard out there for those of us who used to be teenagers — especially in these back-to-school months, when the nostalgia comes creeping up like those floods we used to wear and never, ever should again. But you know who was probably even stranger than you in high school? Your favorite cultural icon. Or maybe not — as is only to be expected, some had joyful (and/or prank-filled) teenage years, some suffered tragedies, some were completely weird, some were popular, and some deserve our respect for even getting through. Click through to read 50 cultural icons on their teenage …Read More

50 Underground Filmmakers Everyone Should Know

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We’re coming to the close of a great retrospective of Joe Sarno’s works at New York’s Anthology Film Archives, ending September 26. Sarno was one of the sexploitation genre’s key auteurs, and his films evoke the independent spirit of the underground film movement — movies popularized during the ‘60s that pushed the boundaries of technique and narrative with experimental artistry. These pictures produced outside the commercial moviemaking industry ranged from the subversive to the formless, delighting in explicit subjects and exploring radical in-camera editing. Crucial as he is, Sarno is just one of these 50 underground filmmakers you should …Read More

Absurd, Uncanny Photos of John Malkovich Recreating Iconic Snapshots

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Everyone’s favorite Siri spokesman John Malkovich has graciously lent his talents to photographer Sandro Miller, who’s given the world the gift of Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich: Homage to Photographic Masters. The idea’s pretty self-explanatory: Miller recreates indelible images, from Andy Warhol’s self-portrait to Diane Arbus’ image of identical twins, with Malkovich replacing the original subjects. The effect’s sometimes eerily exact (with a mustache, Malkovich is sort of a ringer for Albert Einstein) and sometimes hilarious (no amount of makeup is going to hide the fact that Malkovich is not Marilyn Monroe). Click through for the full experience.
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