Archie

The 10 Best Songs by Cartoon Musicians

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We all know the mental agony that is the earworm, the frustration of having one song unwelcomely soundtrack your actions throughout a day, from shampooing your hair to hailing a cab. This torture crosses over into the realm of humiliation when the tune you can’t stop humming is performed by a group of cartoon characters. And yet, our enjoyment of these songs isn’t always unwarranted — plenty of the songs we hear on cartoons are catchy as hell. So plug in your earphones and turn away from nearby coworkers because we’ve compiled a list of undeniably good jams that just so happen to have been sung by animated musicians. Check out our choices after the jump and be sure to leave your own suggestions in the comments.
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When Real Political Figures Cameo in Comic Books

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It was announced yesterday that a forthcoming issue of Archie will feature President Barack Obama and Sarah Palin. In Archie #616: Campaign Pain Part 1, which will be released this December, Obama and Palin become involved in an “out of control” campaign for student government between Archie and Reggie. And yes, a second part comes out a month later in which Riverdale becomes “the center of a national crisis” that somehow involves the Secret Service. Of course this isn’t the first time a politician has made a cameo in a comic book. Click through for more examples, including an earlier appearance by President Obama.
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Daily Dose Pick: Comic Art Propaganda

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Fredrik Stromberg’s Comic Art Propaganda: A Graphic History examines the manipulative power of a medium all too often dismissed as mere superficial entertainment.

From WWII-era Batman and Superman raising war bonds to girl-power oriented manga and rare, Christianity-heavy Archie strips, the book’s collected images feature ideology-charged visual narratives that show a different platform for the art form. Though featured comics vary in subject from racism and religion to sex and drugs, the range of underlying messages is far more nuanced — and absurd — than the obvious “us versus them” subtext.
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