Bill Murray

Stereotyping You By Your Favorite Jim Jarmusch Movie

Only Lovers Left Alive, the ultra-cool vampire hangout flick from indie legend Jim Jarmusch, is out tomorrow in limited release, marking an even dozen feature films from the creatively coiffed auteur. It’s a fascinating filmography, encompassing multiple genres (from comedy to Western to action movie to horror) without fully turning over to any of them; all of his movies are, above all else, Jim Jarmusch Movies, which has sort of become a genre of its own. Yet the film that you pick as your favorite says a lot about you as a person — and thus we give the Jarmusch filmography our signature “stereotyping you by” treatment. … Read More

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Come On, Gen Xers: Let Your Favorite ’80s Movies Die

Over the weekend, director Richard Donner told TMZ (of all places) that he and Steven Spielberg are “doin’ a sequel” to The Goonies, with “hopefully all” of the original stars. One of those stars, Corey Feldman, took to Twitter to respond to the “literally thousands of tweets [and] FB messages” he received after the news broke, confirming that director Donner, producer Spielberg, and writer Chris Columbus are working on a sequel, though “I have yet to see a script, so I remain skeptical.” (Mr. Feldman does have standards, as anyone who saw the straight-to-video Lost Boys and Dream a Little Dream sequels can tell you.) And speaking of skepticism, we also got word over the weekend that Lego Movie and 21 Jump Street director Phil Lord and Chris Miller won’t be directing the long-discussed, yes-they’re-somehow-still-talking-about-this Ghostbusters III, not that their pass will affect that project. So your favorite family-friendly comedies from 1984 and 1985 are getting sequels, 30 years later. Yay? … Read More

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The 25 Best Sports Comedies Ever Made

These kinds of things are always hard to say definitively, due to rampant deterioration and poor documentation, but Harold Lloyd’s 1925 masterpiece The Freshman may well have been the cinema’s first sports comedy. It was certainly the first sports comedy to prove a monster hit, setting up nearly 90 years of athletics-related laughs at the movies. In celebration of The Freshman’s Blu-ray and DVD release today (thanks to our good friends over at the Criterion Collection), here’s a look at some of the finest and funniest sports comedies ever made. … Read More

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‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’: This Is What a Wes Anderson Action Movie Looks Like

There is often an element of storytelling in Wes Anderson’s films — The Royal Tenenbaums and Fantastic Mr. Fox are both framed by the novels (one fictional, one real) they’re adapted from, and Suzie’s books in Moonrise Kingdom are like characters themselves. But the act of telling a story has never been as much the focus of his work as it is in his new picture, The Grand Budapest… Read More

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Flavorwire’s Guide to Indie Flicks to See in March

At risk of getting all post-Oscar hyperbolic, I have a bit of good news: this is one of the best months for independent movies in a long, long time. Of the 11 films I had the chance to check out in preparation for this month’s indie guide, every single one is at least worth your time, and several are a good deal better than that; they offer a wide range of experiences, from familial comedy to baroque suspense to penetrating documentary to, well, Wes Anderson. (He’s kind of his own experience.) Our many, many recommendations for March movie-going are after the jump. … Read More

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An Oral History of ‘Ghostbusters’

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From ‘Meatballs’ to ‘Groundhog Day’: Harold Ramis and Bill Murray’s Classic Collaborations

To say that comedy would be different without Harold Ramis — who passed away today at age 69 — would be an understatement of the most epic proportions. Take a look at his career, which spanned four decades: First you have the Ramis who wrote and produced shows, along with radio and stage skits, for two of the most vaunted American comedy institutions at the peak of their powers: National Lampoon and Second City. You have the Ramis who saw the comedic genius in Rodney Dangerfield and produced some of that legend’s greatest work, and the Ramis who turned the John Hughes script for National Lampoon’s Vacation into one of the greatest comedies of all time. … Read More

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The 25 Best Time-Travel Movies Ever Made

Twenty-five years ago this week (yes, twenty-five, look it up) Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure made its theatrical debut, telling for all posterity the tale of two California slackers who use a phone booth/time machine to gather historical figures for a class project. It was but one variation on a favorite cinematic device: time travel. It’s been done in comedies and dramas, sci-fi and action movies, on budgets giant and miniscule, in spaceships and in DeLoreans. There are dozens of time travel flicks out there, but these are our… Read More

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Is ‘Fantastic Mr. Fox’ the Quintessential Wes Anderson Movie?

When it was released back in the fall of 2009, Fantastic Mr. Fox (out today in a new DVD and Blu-ray special edition from the Criterion Collection) seemed a peculiar detour in the career of co-writer/director Wes Anderson — why on earth was this idiosyncratic indie auteur making what was, by any measure, a kids’ movie? It was a question being asked elsewhere that fall as well; Spike Jonze had just released Where the Wild Things Are, his long-in-the-making adaptation of Maurice Sendak’s iconic picture book, while Martin Scorsese had just announced his next film, a family-friendly adaptation of the young adult novel The Invention of Hugo Cabret. But what is fascinating about Anderson’s film (and Jonze’s, and, ultimately, Scorsese’s) is how little he had to adjust his vision to make a “kids’ movie.” In fact, there is an argument to be made that Fantastic Mr. Fox may be the purest distillation of Anderson’s specific, inimitable style. … Read More

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