Billy Wilder

10 Vastly Underrated Sherlock Holmes Movies

In the midst of a very busy week for catalogue releases, Olive Films has unleashed a handsome new Blu-ray edition of the 1988 comedy Without a Clue, a movie that even you Sherlock fans (and there’s a lot of you) might not know about. A wickedly funny comic take on the boys from Baker Street, its HD debut is a reminder that, despite the current Downey franchise/Sherlock/Elementary-inspired Holmes vogue, there are plenty of wonderful Sherlock Holmes movie adaptations that have been consigned to the dustbins of history (or, at least, of video stores). Here are a few of them: … Read More

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5 Noir Classics That Inspired ‘Dark Rooms’ Author Lili Anolik

Dark Rooms, the debut novel by Lili Anolik, is the sort of mystery that you will rip through in a night. Early on, narrator Grace Baker quotes Edgar Allen Poe: “The death of a beautiful woman is, unquestionably, the most poetical topic in the world.” For Grace, however, it’s not so poetic — her beautiful younger sister, Nica, was murdered on the grounds of their prep school, upending Grace’s life. In the aftermath of the killing, Grace is seeing things through a haze of prescription drugs, a college dropout obsessed with solving the crime. … Read More

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Staff Picks: Screaming Females, Bolaño, and Ned Beauman

Need a great book to read, album to listen to, or TV show to get hooked on? The Flavorwire team is here to help: in this weekly feature, our editorial staffers recommend the cultural object or experience they’ve enjoyed most in the past seven days. Click through for our picks, and tell us what you’ve been loving in the comments. … Read More

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Flavorwire Staffers’ Cultural Resolutions for 2015

Though New Years resolutions may be one of our biggest personal myths — and though it makes little sense that with the popping of a champagne bottle which will likely lead to a nauseated New Year’s Day, the obligatory awkward kiss that will likely not lead to romance, the dropping of a ball which will undoubtedly lead to testicle humor, and the passing of a second which, despite marking THE NEW YEAR, is still just the passing of the second — we persist, year after year, in making them. We remain hopeful, for some reason, that, come midnight, we’ll be New. And whether it’s champaign, a bad kiss, a large ball, or our own ability to actually change that catalyzes progress, we find ourselves setting goals, should that change just so happen to occur. With all that in mind, here are Flavorwire staffers’ cultural resolutions for 2015. … Read More

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The Stories Behind 10 Iconic Movie Scenes

Sixty years ago today, Marilyn Monroe stepped on a subway grate and made movie history. She was shooting a film called The Seven-Year Itch in New York City, and the image of her on the grate, the train passing underneath blowing up her skirt, would become one of the most iconic in all of cinema. To commemorate that magic movie moment, we’ve gathered behind-the-scenes tales of that and nine other classic movie scenes. (We didn’t include Raiders. Harrison Ford shot the guy with the sword instead of fighting him because he had the trots. We’re assuming you knew that one.) … Read More

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Lana Del Rey Is the Urban Outfitters of Music

Lana Del Rey lied to my face. Sitting in the shadows backstage at Lollapalooza last summer, I asked her about her leaked Lady Gaga diss track (“So Legit”). She said she had never met Gaga, that this was a big misunderstanding and the press likes to turn one pop star against another. Thing is, they’ve been photographed together, including high-profile pictures shot by Terry Richardson. Later, an Interscope rep asked me to erase that portion of my interview, or Lana wouldn’t be signing the release forms for publication. He phrased it interestingly: “Lana doesn’t feel comfortable with what she said.” … Read More

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8 Legendary Deleted Movie Scenes You’ve Never Seen

You’d think, by this point, we’d know just about all there is to know about the Indiana Jones movies, but last week (in honor of the second film’s 30th anniversary), Yahoo! Movies tracked down Nizwar Karanj, the actor on the receiving end of Temple of Doom’s notorious improvised heart removal. And he had a bit of inside information: that scene was supposed to be even gorier than it was. Yet somehow, the original version of the scene hasn’t made its way onto the Indy DVDs or Blu-rays, which makes it one more lost bit of film that somehow hasn’t reached viewers in this age of ubiquitous “Deleted Scene” bonus features. … Read More

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Flavorwire Author Club: How James Agee Changed Film Criticism

What’s most impressive — and, in many ways, intimidating — about James Agee isn’t just the sheer versatility of his work, from poetry to nonfiction to novels to screenplays. It’s that he was so brilliant at all of them. This wasn’t a writer who just tossed off his side projects; his film criticism, which appeared primarily in Time and The Nation from 1941 to 1948, was far from a paycheck gig. Within the confines of contemporary film writing, Agee not only carved out a voice of his own, but helped establish the parameters of modern film writing. “For aficionados of film criticism,” writes Jerry Roberts in The Complete History of American Film Criticism, “he may well be the greatest American critic, or at least the greatest until Pauline Kael came along in the 1960s.” … Read More

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12 Abandoned Movies by Famous Screenwriters

Hollywood, this is why you can’t have nice things. A couple of weeks back, word broke that Quentin Tarantino had finished a new screenplay called The Hateful Eight, described as a Western with plum roles for recent Best Actor nominee (and Django Unchained bit player) Bruce Dern and Tarantino fave Christoph Waltz, and there was much rejoicing. That celebration ended earlier this week, when Tarantino discovered that the script had been leaked and pulled the plug on the entire project. But his unproduced script is in good company; here are a few other famous abandoned screenplays we’d love to have… Read More

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