Bob Dylan

Classic Album Cover Remixes Created By a Music-Loving Dad, Starring His Adorable Sons

Take heed Lunchbox dads and fathers of cute Internet dogs: classic album cover remixes starring your two adorable sons are the new thing. Dad Lance Underwood recreates famous album covers and casts his sons Taj and Amar in the roles of musicians such as Bob Dylan, Nat King Cole, Marvin Gaye, and more. Judging by the amount of old-school hip hop, jazz, funk, and soul on his Tumblr, we’d say that Underwood’s sons are getting a fine education in music… Read More

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10 Classic Album Covers Seen on Google Street View

For diehard music fans, visiting the exact location where your favorite album cover was shot is a necessary pilgrimage (this is true of even non-diehards: surely not every tourist who’s crossed Abbey Road with a long stride and a purpose has actually obsessively listened to the record). But thanks to Google and The Guardian, you no longer have to spend hundreds or thousands of dollars trekking to one particular set of geographic coordinates. Now, you can see these famous places from comfort of your own computer screen. As part of The Guardian’s Google Street View series, their “Street View Specialist” has pinpointed the exact locations immortalized on classic album covers, then set them against each other like poetic little windows into the past. … Read More

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25 of the Best Sophomore Albums Ever Made

You know how it goes: a band or a musician puts out a stellar first album, receives heaps of praise and success, and then goes back to the recording studio and turns out a second album. What a bummer, it’s not as good. But is this trend a real thing, or just a myth fueled by how disappointed we, as listeners and critics, can be when artists’ albums don’t live up to our expectations? What follows shows that plenty of great artists were able to avoid the sophomore slump — and, in some cases, turned out the best album of their careers.… Read More

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The Problem With Bob Dylan Shilling for Chrysler

Those of us who sat through the entire one-sided Super Bowl drubbing the Seattle Seahawks gave the Denver Broncos did it either because we really wanted to see the Legion of Boom raise the Vince Lombardi above their heads or because we wanted to see the rest of the commercials. For our trouble, we were treated to Axe Body Spray moving beyond their typical sexist stupidity to exploit Middle America’s fears of war waged by people in the Middle East and Asia. Some viewers were upset by Coca-Cola and Cheerios because the brands’ ads didn’t fit their narrow-minded views of what is and isn’t American, and Scarlett Johansson tried to sell us on SodaStream, which, if you don’t know why that’s controversial, I’ll just point you here. … Read More

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Phosphorescent Offers Another Cover of Dylan’s Tomorrow is a Long Time

Starbucks continues to release startlingly un-saccharine tracks off of their Sweetheart 2014 Valentine album (to be released Feb. 4): this… Read More

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10 Great Christmas Songs Recorded by Jewish Singers

As someone who spends most of the year as what could be referred to as a “Shabbos Goy,” I may be the perfect audience for offerings to the Christmas canon by members of the Tribe. There is, of course, the monumental “White Christmas” penned by Irving Berlin, but throughout the years many Jewish performers have recorded their own Christmas albums for enthusiastic audiences. Here’s a rundown of the best, the weirdest, and the most surprising.  … Read More

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10 Classic Rock Songs That Are Also Epic Mansplanations

Women: according to thousands of beloved songs, we’re shallow or manipulative or cruel or stupid or some unholy combination of the above. Sexism in pop music is so common that pointing out individual instances can begin to feel obvious or redundant. But there’s a certain brand of sexist speech that has fascinated the Internet — and that includes your humble correspondent — over the past few years: the mansplanation. Well, it’s not just for think-pieces and bad cocktail-party chatter. In pop music, the mansplanation manifests itself as a song that finds a male singer directly addressing a woman, bestowing upon her some deeply felt yet condescending pearls of wisdom — generally about the “girl” (as he invariably calls her) herself. Done right, the mansplanation-in-song is as amusing as it is revolting. And nowhere is it more common than in classic rock. Here are ten egregious examples. … Read More

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