Can

“Can World”: An Exclusive Excerpt from Alan Warner’s 33 1/3 Book on ‘Tago Mago’

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The recording of Can’s 1971 album Tago Mago is the stuff of music industry legend — it was made in Schloss Nörvenich, a rural castle in which the band set up camp and created their own little world (rent-free, mind you — if anyone would like to donate a German castle to Flavorwire, please email me forthwith.) Anyway, the band stayed in the castle for three years, jamming to their heart’s content and creating one of the most remarkable records of the 1970s. In this exclusive excerpt from Bloomsbury’s upcoming Tago Mago 33 1/3 book, author Alan Warner — yes, the same Alan Warner who wrote the marvelous Morvern Callar — imagines what life might have been like in Can’s castle.
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10 Awesome Holiday Gifts For the Music Geek in Your Life

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Music nerds can be hard to buy for, mainly because they almost certainly already own pretty much any record you can think of getting them (and many you wouldn’t have ever heard of, obviously). But never fear, because there are still plenty of music-related consumer items on which you can spend your Christmas budget to impress the geekiest of music geeks. Here’s a selection of ideas, from fancy box sets and music books to retro listening devices and an Iggy Pop action figure. (No, …Read More

The 50 Albums Everyone Needs to Own, 1963-2013

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No one buys albums anymore, goes the music industry truism. And yet, for all that the format’s commercial viability may or may not be on the wane, sitting and listening to a great album from start to finish is one of the greatest pleasures that music can bring. Flavorwire recently got to thinking about how one might build a record collection if you really only did buy one record a year. So here’s the result of our thought exercise: 50 albums you really should own, one a year from 1963 until the present …Read More

A Selection of the Most Insanely Long Live Performances in Music

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You may have heard that The National, bless them, will be at P.S. 1 in New York this weekend, performing the same song — “Sorrow,” from their album High Violet — for six hours straight, as part of a collaboration with artist Ragnar Kjartansson. According to the gallery, the show “continues [Kjartansson’s] explorations into the potential of repetitive performance to produce sculptural presence within sound.” That’s all very well, but where does this fit into the hierarchy of insanely long shows? Read on to find out.
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