Charlotte Gainsbourg

Lars von Trier Doesn’t Hate Women. So Why Won’t the Myth of His Misogyny Die?

Any other bride would panic if the stretch limo carrying her to her wedding got stuck en route, too long to make a tight turn on a narrow country road. Not Justine, though. Her face lights up with perverse glee. She laughs. And we have our first sign that the heroine of Lars von Trier’s Melancholia does not respond to the world around her in precisely the way she’s supposed to. … Read More

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‘Nymphomaniac’ Is a Pure Dose of Uncut Lars von Trier

Running at nearly four hours in this, its two-part, “audience friendly” version (there’s a five-and-half-hour uncut version out there as well), Lars von Trier’s Nymphomaniac is less a disciplined, focused motion picture than an all-you-can-eat buffet where the director overloads his plate, and encourages his audience to do the same. It’s a wandering, freeform exploration of the themes, subjects, and ideas of particular interest to the filmmaker — and sex is among them, certainly, but it doesn’t seem to be his primary focus, or destination. … Read More

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Stellan Skarsgård Has a Recommendation for Where to Drink in Stockholm

Stellan Skarsgård may be best known as a European actor bringing elegance and menace to big-budget American films — he’s part of The Avengers world, important to Thor and its recent sequel, he was in David Fincher’s The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, and he’s been a reliable villain-type-with-layers ever since he was in Good Will Hunting. But Skarsgård’s American career is just the tip of the iceberg. The biggest actor in Sweden, Skarsgård is such an important cultural export that there’s a picture of him at the Stockholm airport next to Sweden’s other touchstones (Abba, Bjorn Borg, Ingmar Bergman, Stieg Larsson, Pippi Longstocking). Perhaps Skarsgård’s most interesting long term-collaboration has come from his work with Danish auteur Lars von Trier: from Breaking the Waves to Melancholia, Skarsgård has been there as an often-bruised and impotent male character, bouncing off the dramatic femmes that populate Von Trier’s world. … Read More

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Flavorwire’s Guide to Indie Flicks to See in March

At risk of getting all post-Oscar hyperbolic, I have a bit of good news: this is one of the best months for independent movies in a long, long time. Of the 11 films I had the chance to check out in preparation for this month’s indie guide, every single one is at least worth your time, and several are a good deal better than that; they offer a wide range of experiences, from familial comedy to baroque suspense to penetrating documentary to, well, Wes Anderson. (He’s kind of his own experience.) Our many, many recommendations for March movie-going are after the jump. … Read More

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The Best Dylan Cues in Movie History

So Bob Dyan’s got a new album out today, and while your film editor usually sticks to the movie beat, it’s not like Dylan is just a music figure, or even that vaguest of descriptions, a “pop culture icon.” He’s also an ever-present force in film and television, with his songs (as either writer or performer) appearing in nearly 400 movies and TV shows (according to IMDb). And while at least half of those are lazy filmmakers using the opening riff of Hendrix’s “All Along the Watchtower” cover to convey the turbulence of the sixties, that’s still quite a lot of Zimmy on film — he’s been much more free with his licensing than, say, the Beatles, whose best cinematic cues we ran down a couple of months back. In honor of Dylan’s new record (always a cause for celebration), we do the same for him below — with the same rules, i.e., no covers, no straight-up performances, but scenes where the music of Mr. Dylan is spotlighted, and in turn furthers the action and mood. Our ten favorites are after the jump. … Read More

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10 of the Most Unbelievable Movie Families

As we mentioned in our June Indie Preview, one of our favorite movies of the month is Your Sister’s Sister, Lynn Shelton’s smart and sophisticated indie rom-com featuring Emily Blunt, Rosemarie DeWitt, and Mark Duplass. But even great moves can have their little flaws, and one thing did nag at us a bit while watching the film: how is it that Blunt and DeWitt are sisters, but have completely different accents? Blunt speaks in her natural British (instead of adopting an American accent, as she did to match onscreen sister Amy Adams in Sunshine Cleaning), and DeWitt keeps her American accent (instead of adopting one to match Blunt’s, as Alison Brie did in The Five Year Engagement). It doesn’t ruin the movie or anything, but it did get us thinking about other movies where we didn’t completely buy the familial connection of the characters; after the jump, we’ve assembled ten of the most egregious examples. … Read More

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Serge Gainsbourg's Most Memorable Music Collaborations

Writer and artist Joann Sfar’s directorial debut, Gainsbourg: A Heroic Life — about legendary French singer-songwriter, actor, and director Serge Gainsbourg — arrives on Blu-ray today. The film stars Eric Elmosnino as the chanteur and follows his beginnings in Nazi-occupied Paris, through his songwriting days in the 1960s, to his death in 1991. Gainsbourg’s prolific artistry helped propel the careers of vocalists like France Gall and Françoise Hardy — and he managed to make them stars while he was simultaneously recording his own brilliant albums. We’ve looked at several of the influential artist’s most memorable collaborations past the break. Tell us what pairings you’d include in the comments below. … Read More

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