Chuck Palahniuk

Caitlyn Jenner Loved ‘Tangerine,’ Samuel L. Jackson Hated ‘The Force Awakens’: Links You Need to See

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Caitlyn Jenner’s place in the mainstream is very different from that of Sean Baker’s Tangerine. The similarities between the two begin and end at the word “transgender”: Jenner reigns supreme as the mainstream’s de facto glam queen of the trans community, while Tangerine is Baker’s scrappy, iPhone-shot film explores the underground trans community operating in what amounts to the red-light district of Los Angeles. But, as it turns out, the two of them, though seemingly very dissimilar, were able to form a connection.
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Chuck Palahniuk’s Views on Gender in Fiction Haven’t Evolved Since 2005

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To promote the upcoming release of his new novel Beautiful You and the Fight Club 2 sequel, Chuck Palahniuk has been periodically answering fan questions on his Tumblr. As expected, most of the questions revolve around Fight Club. Also as expected, most of the answers range from insipid to laughably stupid — including one response in particular that seemed like a case of mass trolling. In a post that has since been deleted (but will live on in screenshots and reblogs forever), Chuck Palahniuk mourns the dearth of novels that focus on male issues:
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Chuck Palahniuk’s Books Reimagined as Insane Concert Posters

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The books of Chuck Palahniuk are steeped in the signifiers of cult literature — sex, violence, dark humor — so it makes sense that their stories and styles would lend themselves to perhaps the ultimate cult art form: the rock-concert poster. Paulo Correa, an art director and illustrator based in the Philippines, has taken up the task of translating Palahniuk’s aesthetic into what he calls “lowbrow gig posters” for each of his books. Click through to see the full series, which we spotted at Design Taxi.
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10 Compelling Unnamed Protagonists in Literature

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Happy birthday, Ralph Ellison. The late author is perhaps most famous for his 1952 existentialist novel, Invisible Man, which touched upon issues facing African-Americans, as told through one man’s search for his identity in New York City during the 1930s. The title spent 16 weeks on the best-seller list and won the prestigious National Book Award for Fiction in 1953. Ellison’s use of the nameless protagonist echoes themes of social blindness throughout the novel. The narrator describes himself as “invisible” in the prologue:

I am an invisible man. No, I am not a spook like those who haunted Edgar Allan Poe; nor am I one of your Hollywood-movie ectoplasms. I am a man of substance, of flesh and bone, fiber and liquids — and I might even be said to possess a mind. I am invisible, understand, simply because people refuse to see me.

Sometimes misunderstood, other times preferring the cloak of anonymity, the unnamed protagonist has acted as the voice of many throughout literature. Here are ten compelling uses of the literary device.
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