coen brothers

10 Quirky Illustrations of Coen Brothers Characters

The anonymous artist behind the Coen Cast Tumblr is doing perhaps the best fan art I’ve found dedicated to the Coen Brothers’ oeuvre. Keeping in mind the heavy layer of wackiness that pervades the Coen Brothers’ films (well, perhaps with the exception of No Country for Old Men), the series depicts familiar characters like The Dude, Llewyn Davis, and Maude Gunderson in broad, cartoony strokes. They’re a perfect fit for the Coens’ world. Check out a sampling after the jump. … Read More

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Ridley Scott and Cormac McCarthy’s ‘The Counselor’ Disappoints

When the Coen Brothers took home a bundle of awards for their 2007 adaptation of Cormac McCarthy’s No Country for Old Men, including the Oscars for Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Adapted Screenplay, the 1992 National Book Award winner found himself shot into a whole new realm of fame. By then, McCarthy was already on a professional hot streak: in April of 2007 Oprah had picked his latest novel, The Road, for her Book Club. Literature lovers had already known of McCarthy’s greatness, but now everybody knew, and everybody wanted to read him. You could hardly go anywhere without seeing somebody clutching a copy of the book the Coens had adapted, or the post-apocalyptic novel that Oprah loved so much (and would eventually be turned into a well-received 2009 film). … Read More

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Our Favorite Films Shot in NOLA

Presented by NOLA

New Orleans serves as a vibrant backdrop for some of our favorite movies — and it’s really no wonder. The city is not only full of historical architecture, but also boasts a thriving cultural scene that all but becomes a character itself in the following flicks. NOLA has been an inspiration to filmmakers for decades; read on for our top picks, and then follow your NOLA to get inspired by the Crescent City.  … Read More

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Cannes 2013: How the Festival’s Most Anticipated Films Fared With the Critics — And When You Can See Them

The 66th annual Cannes Film Festival is officially behind us. Drama seemed to leap off the screen on the French Riviera with unseasonable rainy weather, a string of robberies, and plenty of emotional moments. The reviews are in, deals have been inked, and the festival’s most prestigious awards have been granted. We took a look at how the most anticipated titles fared with critics and filled you in on the latest details so you can be there when Cannes’ greatest arrive in a theater near you. … Read More

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The Chilliest Films of All Time

The dark days of winter are upon us, providing the perfect excuse to curl up with a good movie at home. If you still want to channel the crisp outdoor temperatures and get into the spirit of the season, we’ve selected some of the chilliest movies you can watch while warm and from the comfort of your own home. These wintry films feature snowy, icy settings that are integral to the powerful atmosphere of each story, existing as more than just a pretty backdrop. White blankets of winter weather reveal a dichotomy that filmmakers love to toy with, symbolizing the emotional mindsets of their characters, isolation and tragic circumstances, or the fragile beauty of a new love. Here are ten of our favorites that use snow as a filmic mirror and canvas. Share some of your picks, below. … Read More

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The Cinematography of 10 Great Filmmakers Captured in Cinemagraphs

In recent years, graphic interchange format, once a throwback to the awkward early years of web design, has come into its own as an art form. Leading the way is the ever-popular cinemagraph, an enhancement on photography that typically adds subtle moving elements to the scene — wisps of blowing hair, blinking eyes, rising smoke, etc. Although cinemagraphs first gained popularity for their use in advertising, it seems only natural that the meme has taken hold of cinema as well, capturing memorable movie stills in infinite loops of movement. If We Don’t, Remember Me has been busy amassing quite the collection of these cinematic cinemagraphs, adding a new dimension to the way in which images can convey the aesthetic of a certain directorial style. From the creepy to the minimalistic, we’ve gathered a list of cinemagraphs that capture the distinctive mise-en-scène of 10 of our favorite filmmakers. … Read More

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10 Famous Directors on Making Their First Feature Films

It’s been five long years since we’ve been treated to a new Paul Thomas Anderson film. The 2007 Daniel Day-Lewis drama There Will Be Blood left an indelible impression on audiences, but fans of the Boogie Nights director are ready to see his 1950s-set, Scientology-inspired tale The Master about a cult leader (Philip Seymore Hoffman) who rises to prominence, with a drifter as his right-hand man (Joaquin Phoenix).

Although Anderson quickly established himself as a wunderkind, the road to the filmmaker’s first feature wasn’t an easy one — as website This Must Be the Place pointed out. See what the talented director had to say about making his first movie Hard Eight past the break. Then, click through for more words of wisdom, anxious confessions, memories, and the early hopes and fears of other famous directors, reflecting on their first feature films. … Read More

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10 Wedding Films That Are Actually Good

Wedding films are largely like Hallmark cards transferred to celluloid – saccharine piffle based around an institution that’s been progressively losing its relevance for centuries. But still, despite the existence of innumerable dire films like The Wedding Planner and My Best Friend’s Wedding, not every film involving marriage should be consigned a priori to the celluoid scrapheap – occasionally one comes along that manages to be both non-sentimental and amusing. And so, in our sole concession to the ongoing media hypefest that is the Royal Wedding, here’s a selection of our favorite nuptial films – the ones that don’t suck like a brand new turbo-charged Dyson. … Read More

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Required Viewing: When Great Directors Make Westerns

We tend to associate our favorite auteurs with “serious cinema” — high-minded dramas that don’t delve too far into goofy genres like sci-fi, horror, or westerns. But recently, watching Kelly Reichardt’s fantastic new western Meek’s Cutoff, we got to thinking about how many important mainstream and independent filmmakers have tried their hand at the genre. Our list of must-watch westerns by great directors (excluding those who are known primarily for their westerns, like John Ford and Sam Peckinpah) is after the jump.

… Read More

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