David Cronenberg

Convincing Posters That Cast Classic Stars in Contemporary Films

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If you worship cinema’s holy trinity of “Davids,” which includes David Lynch, David Fincher, and David Cronenberg, you’ll adore graphic designer Peter Stults’ What If: Movies Reimagined for Another Time and Place poster series. The New York-based artist trades contemporary actors with classic stars (and directors) on the posters for modern films. In this volume of his one-sheet remakes, which we learned about on Booooooom, Stults tackles the filmographies of the three Davids — along with other movies, like Guardians of the Galaxy (with Michael Jackson in the lead role, which suddenly makes complete sense).
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The 5 Best Movies to Buy or Stream This Week: ‘Dope,’ ‘Aladdin’

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Yes, that’s right, our top two recommended new releases this week are a hard R-rated drugs and hip-hop comedy and a quintessential Disney movie, whaddaya want, our tastes are eclectic. But there is a thread connecting them: one was a ‘90s favorite, and the other is singularly obsessed with that era. Also on the shelf this week: a Sundance sensation, an early effort from one of our favorite filmmakers, and a whole mess of free flicks on YouTube.
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10 Movies That Take Place Inside a Character’s Head

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Pixar’s latest film Inside Out opens in theaters this weekend. The 3D-animated movie is set inside the mind of a young girl named Riley, whose emotions are personified by an all-star voice cast, including Amy Poehler. “The film reinforces a white-bread and hetero-normative version of family, while also creating a wild, female-centric road-trip adventure story, a groundbreaking Thelma and Louise for kids that celebrates difference,” writes our own Sarah Seltzer. Inside Out is hardly the first film to use the mindscape as a place of dramatic action. Here are ten other films, including a few that might make you question how sane a character truly is.
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Vegas on Mars: Recalling ‘Total Recall’ 25 Years Later

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Philip K. Dick has enjoyed a surprisingly active and commercial afterlife considering the decidedly non-commercial nature of his output and the fact that, from a sales perspective, he was never more than a cult success during his lifetime. Then again, Dick’s posthumous popularity as the source for big-budget science fiction movies both revered (Total Recall, Minority Report) and not so revered (Paycheck, Next, The Adjustment Bureau) should perhaps not come as a surprise because Dick trafficked in the kind of sexy, hooky, accessible ideas movies love.

Dick has been adapted extensively in part because his work is so adaptable. Filmmakers can take the core of an idea explored in a Dick short story and adapt it any way they see fit, secure in the knowledge that if they take as many liberties with Dick’s work as filmmakers have tended to take, they only risk alienating a small core of Dick cultists. Sure enough, by the time the Dick short story “We Can Remember It For You Wholesale” was adapted into 1990’s Total Recall a quarter-century ago by a divisive satirist with a uniquely bloody, extreme take on the grotesque excesses of American culture named Paul Verhoeven, it had already been through several different strikingly different iterations.
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The Weirdest Romantic-Horror Relationships on Film

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Part Richard Linklater love story, part Cronenbergian horror film, Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead’s Spring — in theaters this weekend — follows the bizarre development of a fling between an American backpacker and mysterious woman in Italy who hides a dark, primordial secret. It’s an unusual romantic tale that follows in the footsteps of some of horror cinema’s strangest couples. Here are ten of the weirdest.
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