David Fincher

The 10 Best Twist Endings in Movie History

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Twenty years ago this week, Bryan Singer’s The Usual Suspects opened in theaters, and everybody lost their minds. It ended up redefining the “twist” ending, becoming a kind of shorthand for a left-field, eleventh-hour plot development that reconfigures everything that’s come before. But it was neither the first nor last movie to do that ending, or do it well. …Read More

The 10 Best True Crime Movies Ever Made

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Today, New York’s Film Forum kicks off a four-week, 50-film “True Crime” festival, spotlighting some of the most iconic dramas, mysteries, and thrillers based on real events. It’s one of our most durable genres — the festival spans something like eight decades — and for good reason: the best true crime movies are often tense, gripping, and suspenseful (even when we already know the outcome). Here are a few of our all-time favorites.
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David Fincher, ‘Strangers on a Train,’ and the Tricky Business of Remaking Hitchcock

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It’s a classic good news/bad news scenario: the good news is that director David Fincher, screenwriter Gillian Flynn, and star Ben Affleck are looking to reteam after the critical and popular success of last fall’s Gone Girl. The bad news? It’s for a remake (or, as Variety inexplicably dubs it, a reboot) of Alfred Hitchcock’s 1951 adaptation of Patricia Highsmith’s Strangers on a Train. The news is getting a pretty mixed reception among film buffs, even Fincher diehards, and for good reason: remaking Hitch is not, traditionally, a feat wisely attempted or successfully accomplished.
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10 Electronic Albums for Maximum Productivity in 2015

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Productivity talk can edge into dystopian territory, but at the beginning of the year, I like to think of that kind of research and the tips that follow as a necessary self-help effort. And anyway, we’ve all heard the studies about what music does to our brains while we’re trying to work.

“When the task is clearly defined and is repetitive in nature… research seems to suggest that music is definitely useful,” Fast Company notes. As Quartz points out, nine out of ten people are more efficient at work while listening to music. A landmark 1972 study proved that factory workers performed better when “upbeat, happy” songs were played overhead. But what exactly does “upbeat” and “happy” mean to the individual desk worker with access to anything and everything (thanks, Spotify)? And what if “happy” and “upbeat” isn’t really your thing?
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