Edward Gorey

Edward Gorey’s Vintage Paperback Covers for Doubleday Anchor

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Writer, illustrator, spooky legend of the macabre and noted cat lover Edward Gorey spent the 1950s as the art editor for Doubleday’s new editions of Anchor paperbacks concerning serious and academic novels. According to Goreyography, the artist was responsible for the total cover package with the lettering, typography, design layouts, and in some cases, the art (other artists also contributed illustrations for this series, including the likes of Milton Glaser and Andy Warhol). We first saw these covers via Austin Kleon’s website, and do check it out: there’s a wonderful collection of 90-plus Gorey-era Doubleday Anchor paperbacks on Flickr. See a small sampling below.
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15 Eye-Catching Calendars to Keep You Organized in 2014

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The new year approaches, and for those of you unwilling to let go of certain paper ephemera (we understand), it’s time to purchase a 2014 calendar. If scribbling your personal appointments on gorgeous letterpress paper or livening up your kitchen with 12 months of pop culture-inspired photos makes you tingle, we have some delicious calendar candy for …Read More

10 of the Best Holiday Books You Probably Haven’t Read

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For many of us, December is the month of trotting out old classics: traditions, recipes, that one silver plate that’s been in the family for generations. Of course, it’s a time of classic holiday reading, too, so if you’re both the bookish and the celebratory type, A Christmas Carol, The Polar Express, and How the Grinch Stole Christmas! are likely to be laying about, cookie crumbs mashed into the creases of your favorite pages, hot chocolate rings on the back. But what about the holiday books that don’t get quite as much love? This year, if you find you’ve gone over The Night Before Christmas one too many times, try swapping in one of these excellent and under-appreciated choices, which we bet only the jolliest among you will have …Read More

America’s Greatest Goth Eccentric: Why Edward Gorey Never Goes Out of Style

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You really have to push yourself to imagine Edward Gorey at the beginning of his career, hanging his early works in the iconic Gotham Book Mart in the mid-1950s. But that’s exactly how he got his start, a few years after graduating from Harvard, his pictures adorning the walls of a store whose customers included Saul Bellow and Mary McCarthy. Gorey’s work has become so commercially ubiquitous in the past few decades that it is almost hard to envision him as part of New York’s highbrow set, his illustrations hanging over fresh copies of the Partisan Review, his unique vision on display for a still easily shocked postwar America.
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