Ezra Pound

100 Years Later: T.S. Eliot’s ‘The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock’

By

Thomas Stearns Eliot began writing “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” in 1910, at the age of twenty-two. The poem was published five years later, when Ezra Pound, whom Eliot met and befriended as an expatriate in Europe, sent it to Poetry in Chicago, adding: “This is as good as anything I’ve ever seen.” This year, then, marks the 100 year anniversary of Prufrock’s imaginative journey into the half-deserted streets, the one-night cheap hotels, and the chambers of the sea. It is also, as many have noted, the 50th anniversary of Eliot’s death. I prefer to remember the younger man who wrote “Prufrock.”
…Read More

13 Famous Authors’ Mugshots

By

We tend to think of writers as shy, retiring types, who don’t get into any trouble and definitely don’t get arrested for disorderly conduct or treason. But of course, the literary world has had its fair share of wild and dangerous persons, some of whom are as notorious as criminals (whether rightly or falsely accused) as they are as writers. After the jump, check out 13 mugshots from famous authors’ adventures in police custody — not for use on the backs of book covers.
…Read More

9 Famous Authors Who Did Stints in Mental Institutions

By

Everyone knows that all authors are totally crazy, right? After all, that’s what makes so many of them so brilliant. But today, on the anniversary of Ezra Pound’s federally mandated release from St. Elizabeth’s Hospital for the criminally insane, where he had been held for 13 years following his arrest on charges of treason, we celebrate those authors who have actually been institutionalized for their mental illnesses (or, in some cases, for what others thought was mental illness).
…Read More