F. Scott Fitzgerald

Great Literary Christmas Tales That Aren’t ‘A Christmas Carol’

Charles Dickens has pretty much dominated the Christmas story game for the last 170 years as of this week, since that’s when his famous novella A Christmas Carol was released. To break that down: that’s 170 years of knowing you’re going to hear the story of Bob Crachet, Tiny Tim, the ghost of Jacob Marley, and, of course, Ebenezer Scrooge around this time of year. And even though A Christmas Carol might be the best example of mixing high literature with the festive season, Dickens certainly wasn’t the only writer that could write a beautiful Christmas scene. Here are a few other classic, yet underrated, Christmas tales in literature. … Read More

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15 Famous Authors and Their Fashion Label Counterparts

Literature and fashion meet once again as Club Monaco has announced that its flagship retail location will host a bookstore when it opens up this week, leaving us to ponder: what are our favorite authors’ fashion-label counterparts? … Read More

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20 Photos of Famous Authors in Awesome Costumes

Halloween is fast approaching, and if you’re the writerly (read: introverted, inside-cat) type, you may be experiencing some anxiety about dressing up in a costume and walking the streets. But take heart: some of your very favorite authors have been known to don a costume from time to time, too. So it must be cool, right? This slideshow is also appropriate for those itching to wear a literary costume this year but who have already worn out their Poe ravens and DFW bandannas: go meta and dress as one of your favorite authors in one of their costumes. Click through to see some amazing writers dressed to the… Read More

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Flavorwire Exclusive: Read Excerpts From F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Teenage Diary

According to many of the numerous biographies written about him, F. Scott Fitzgerald was handy with a pen even as a youngster, and his adoring mother, noticing her baby boy’s intelligence, made sure that his talent was fostered even if it meant spending beyond the Fitzgeralds’ means. … Read More

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Celebrate F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Birthday With His Most Memorable Films

Amid all the hullabaloo leading up to Baz Luhrmann’s adaptation of The Great Gatsby, critics couldn’t help comparing it to the 1974 version starring Robert Redford as F. Scott Fitzgerald’s most famous character. To readers’ despair, neither of the massively hyped films turned out to be an adequate adaptation of one of the 20th century’s most serious Great American Novel contenders. But the failure of the Gatsby movies tends to obscure the fact that Fitzgerald — who was born on this day in 1896 — had far more than just Jay and Daisy to offer cinema. … Read More

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The 50 Greatest Campus Novels Ever Written

No matter how old you are, the back-to-school season holds a certain kind of allure – be it nostalgia for scholarly tradition, the crisping of the days, a Pavlovian need to buy books, or just the satisfaction that you don’t have to be in class ever again. If you’re looking to indulge yourself without the schoolwork, you may take pleasure in another hallowed tradition: the campus novel. That is, books concerning the lives of students, professors, and miscellaneous academics, generally in or around a college. Here are 50 of the… Read More

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Then and Now: Photos of Real Places Mentioned in Fiction

Looking through Jane Austen’s England by Roy and Lesley Adkins, it’s difficult not to compare the way things were during England’s Georgian and Regency eras with the England of today. The book gives a glimpse at everything from wedding superstitions to the “Bloody Code” (the country’s system of laws and punishments from 1688 to 1815, including the 50 offenses that were punishable by death), which highlight how much has changed since the time of Sense and Sensibility and Pride and Prejudice. But what about the times and places that influenced other classic authors? More specifically, what do the real places mentioned in famous works of fiction look like now? … Read More

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10 of Literature’s Most Unreliable Narrators

It was 55 years ago today that Vladimir Nabokov’s controversial novel Lolita was first published in the US. Nabokov’s remarkable prose is as evocative today as it was in 1958. Facet’s of the author’s great work about a middle-aged lit scholar’s obsession with a 12-year-old girl have been debated since its publication, many arguing the chronology of the tragic events and Humbert Humbert’s fallibility as a narrator. We discuss this, and more of literature’s unreliable narrators, past the break. … Read More

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Pre-Post-Fiction: Classic Novels That Blur the Line Between Real Life and Fiction

The New York Observer‘s review of Awl co-founder Choire Sicha’s new book is generating a bit of chatter in the corners of the Internet we frequent. The reviewer, Michael Miller, groups Sicha’s book with recent ones by Sheila Heti, Ben Lerner, and Tao Lin as what he terms a new wave of “post-fiction.” Post-fiction, he says, is characterized by a chiasmus between the real and the made-up, blurring the two into nonrecognition.” I would suggest that this genre is in fact far older than Miller suggests — it’s just that we used to call novels novels, back in the age when “Based on a True Story” was not worth its weight in marketing gold. … Read More

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The Bizarre, Misunderstood Afterlife of Zelda Fitzgerald

Had she not perished in a fire that decimated the mental hospital where she was living in back in 1948, Zelda Fitzgerald (who would be celebrating her birthday as a spry 113-year-old today) would be having a really interesting 2013. Of course, she didn’t survive her time at Highland Hospital, and living that long is hardly plausible for a person who epitomized the raging ways of the Roaring ’20s, but Zelda Fitzgerald’s life was one full of what ifs and misconceptions. Speculating further doesn’t seem all that absurd. … Read More

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