feminism

Why Won’t the Media Call Planned Parenthood Shooting “Terrorism”?

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Coming on the heels of the Charlie Hebdo massacre, the news of last month’s Paris attacks immediately drew many onlookers’ minds to terrorist organizations like ISIS and al-Qaeda. Similarly, and especially for reproductive rights advocates, Friday’s reports of an active shooter near a Colorado Springs Planned Parenthood clinic evoked the long and sordid history of terrorist violence against abortion providers.
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‘The Hunger Games” Strange, Simultaneously Progressive and Regressive Take on Gender

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The Hunger Games series comes to a dark and thunderous final conclusion with Mockingjay: Part 2 this weekend. Its angry, bow-wielding heroine Katniss Everdeen has been hailed as a feminist triumph, and an inspiration for girls and boys alike. So, as the credits roll and the smoke of Panem’s war begins to thin out, it’s worth looking back at how the series did — and didn’t — upend our expectations about gender.
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Why Don’t We Ever Talk About Women Sharing Music With Each Other?

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In the annals of Screwed Up Things People Have Said On Twitter, this one seemed pretty banal: Spotify’s Matthew Ogle tweeted a flip comment about his company’s “Discovery” feature having “disrupted boyfriends,” based on a few women’s (also possibly flip) tweets on the topic. Still, many of us who are femme-of-center on the gender spectrum saw the tweet, sighed, and thought, “Oh, god, this again?”
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Amazon’s ’60s Feminism Pilot ‘Good Girls Revolt’ Wants to Be ‘Mad Men,’ But With Nora Ephron

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The pilot of Amazon’s late-’60s feminist office drama Good Girls Revolt ends with a group of women gleefully telling their male colleagues that they’ve been to the kind of women’s meeting where women investigate their vaginas with their compact mirrors. Then one woman goes home and, as her husband kvetches from the bedroom, sits on the toilet and pulls out her compact mirror.
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Flavorwire Interview: ‘Witches of America’ Author Alex Mar on Witchcraft’s Feminist Appeal and the Impact of Ritual

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In Alex Mar’s 2010 documentary American Mystic, the New York City journalist observed the lives of three different subjects who identify with fringe religious beliefs, including a woman and witchcraft practitioner named Morpheus. The experience had a profound impact on Mar, who had been raised Catholic, but wasn’t religious. Still, she had an innate curiosity where her own spirituality was concerned. Mar entered the world of Wicca and Paganism to continue her journey in a recently published book called Witches of America — part travelogue, memoir, and sociological study of the occult.
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