feminism

Lydia Lunch. Photo credit: Jasmine Hirst

“Pleasure Is the Ultimate Rebellion”: Lydia Lunch on Making Poetry Out of Horror, Uncompromising Self-Love, and Her First Major Retrospective

By

Lydia Lunch, no wave queen and teenage runaway turned Teenage Jesus, is back in New York City, where it all started for her in the 1970s. Lydia Lunch: So Real It Hurts, her first major retrospective, opens at Howl! Happening May 8 and surveys her photography series The War Is Never Over, the provocative installation You Are Not Safe in Your Own Home, and the many letters, posters, and ephemera from her incredible, nearly 40-year career. Performances and live events accompany the exhibit, which runs through June 5. A contrarian, hysterian, and hedonist, Lunch’s song lyrics, writings, photography, and spoken word performances peel back the skin and peer deep into the chasm of contemporary culture. While she searches for a home for her archives, readies for a new release from her band Retrovirus, preps to teach at a university summer writing program, and sees a vinyl reissue of the powerful Conspiracy of Women on Nicolas Jaar’s label Other People, the iconoclast shared her views on how to be the ultimate confrontationist.
… Read More

Mary-Shelley

The Free Love and Radical Genius of Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley

By

Mary Shelley was the brilliant parent of science fiction who hobnobbed with the Romantic poets and gave us Frankenstein, our most enduring monster-cum-morality tale, a woman whose wild and daring existence was whitewashed by her descendants. Her mother, Mary Wollstonecraft, was a self-created political genius and writer of “A Vindication of the Rights of Women,” whose sexual lifestyle — radical for her time — meant her intellectual legacy was trashed for a century until her work was “exhumed” by female scholars who recognized her as their forbear.
… Read More

Outlander_Gallery1_wm

‘Outlander’ Episode 12 Recap: “Lallybroch”

By

Attention, lads and lassies: there are no sex scenes in this episode. I repeat: there are no sex scenes in this episode. As a public service, I am putting this disclaimer above my recap. But that doesn’t mean there’s no fun to be had (okay, there’s a little less fun to be had). If you watched… Read More

Shakespeare2

How Shakespeare’s Heroines Evolved From One-Dimensional to Feminist

By

It’s the Bard’s birthday! Some celebrate the day by inserting “thee”s and “forsooth”s into their speech, and others by gathering Shakespeare’s quips and aphorisms. But there’s another way to honor his legacy, and that is to take a look at his treatment of women, which might be very instructive to some of our more boorish and misogynist culture creators today. Shakespeare was once just like them, but he evolved into something far greater.
… Read More

From left: Courtney Barnett, Waxahatchee's Katie Crutchfield, Alabama Shakes' Brittany Howard, Torres' Mackenzie Scott, Speedy Ortiz's Sadie Dupuis

“Woman” Is Not a Genre: Why the New, Female-Led Rock Revolution Is for Everybody

By

Every few years, music fans are asked to mourn rock ‘n’ roll’s death. Apparently the genre is in worse condition than Keith Richards himself. The eulogies often bemoan the so-called lack of great rock bands these days — a scenario Forbes described two years ago as amounting to there being “no Led Zeppelin for the current generation of music fans.” But from where I stand, rock ‘n’ roll is alive and well. It just doesn’t look or act like it used to. From Courtney Barnett to Speedy Ortiz’s Sadie Dupuis to Waxahatchee’s Katie Crutchfield to Torres’ Mackenzie Scott to Alabama Shakes’ Brittany Howard, young singer-songwriters who lead their own rock bands have released, or will soon release, some of the year’s best albums. They all also happen to be… Read More

lily allen

Activists to Twitter: New Abuse Protections Don’t Go Far Enough

By

It’s openly acknowledged, even by the company itself, that Twitter is the pits when it comes to protecting users from abuse. In February, a leaked internal memo quoted CEO Dick Costolo as saying, “We suck at dealing with abuse and trolls on the platform and we’ve sucked at it for years… It’s no secret and the rest of the world talks about it every day. We lose core user after core user by not addressing simple trolling issues that they face every day.” An official op-ed last week reiterated the point. “Freedom of expression means little as our underlying philosophy if we continue to allow voices to be silenced because they are afraid to speak up,” wrote Twitter’s general counsel Vijaya Gadde.
… Read More