Francis Ford Coppola

10 Potentially Career-Wrecking Films by Great Directors

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If your weirdo cinephile friend is all in a tizzy today, there’s a reason: Sorcerer, the much-maligned, long-neglected, yet freshly re-appreciated Wages of Fear remake from director William Friedkin, is making its Blu-ray debut today (and finally getting a proper anamorphic DVD release as well). When the film was originally released back in 1977, it was a highly anticipated, big-budget effort from Friedkin, the Oscar-winning director of The Exorcist and The French Connection. Unfortunately, its arrival in the moviegoing marketplace was preceded, by about a month, by a little movie called Star Wars, and that picture pretty much lay waste to everything in its path. It’s not a new story — filmmaking careers are made of highs and lows, and even the finest directors have seen falls that were difficult, or even impossible, to bounce back from.
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The Origins of 10 Famous Movie Catchphrases

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Audiences can forget the acting and the plot in a movie, but sometimes it’s those catchphrases, those memorable lines, that stick with us. Movie dialogue has become part of our cultural lexicon — and thanks to the Internet, one doesn’t even have to see a film in order to become attached to a clever string of words. After spotting a video that explains the origin of Matthew McConaughey’s recently resurrected catchphrase from Dazed and Confused, we went searching for more stories behind oft-quoted cinematic …Read More

25 Things You Didn’t Know About ‘The Godfather’

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On this day in 1972, Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather had its debut screening in New York City. “The lights come on, and it was the eeriest feeling of all time: there was not one sound. No applause. The audience sat there, stunned,” producer Albert S. Ruddy said of the premiere. Despite a series of casting struggles, firings, accidents, and behind-the-scenes drama, The Godfather helped usher in the era of the modern blockbuster (something Steven Spielberg’s Jaws would solidify a few years later) and became the highest grossing film that year. We’re taking a look at some fascinating, fun facts you might not know about the crime epic that Stanley Kubrick once called the greatest movie ever created.
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The 25 Best Time-Travel Movies Ever Made

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Twenty-five years ago this week (yes, twenty-five, look it up) Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure made its theatrical debut, telling for all posterity the tale of two California slackers who use a phone booth/time machine to gather historical figures for a class project. It was but one variation on a favorite cinematic device: time travel. It’s been done in comedies and dramas, sci-fi and action movies, on budgets giant and miniscule, in spaceships and in DeLoreans. There are dozens of time travel flicks out there, but these are our …Read More

10 Happy Accidents in Cinema

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We all make mistakes. Even Bill Murray, which resulted in one of the funniest stories circulating the Internet this week — about his involvement with the Garfield films. Murray’s role in the movie won’t go down in the annals of cinema as one of the greatest film “accidents,” but there are plenty of other movie mistakes that will. Some of our favorite films were made better by serendipitous moments. See what happened when the stars aligned and movie magic happened.
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Charming Watercolor Portraits of Pop Culture’s Greatest Showdowns

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Artist Scott Campbell (aka “Scott C.”) has a unique stock-in-trade: he creates downright winsome, child-like watercolors dramatizing the “great showdowns” in pop culture. In his collection Great Showdowns: The Return (out next Tuesday, with a foreword by Edgar Wright), he presents an all-new assortment of movie confrontations, drawing on everything from Hot Fuzz and Pulp Fiction to Teen Wolf and Nosferatu. And he was kind enough to share a selection of them with us; check them out after the jump.
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30 Criminally Underrated Movie Sequels

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Next week brings the Blu-ray debut of Psycho IIand Psycho III, two 1980s horror films that had the gall, the downright temerity, to follow up Hitchcock’s groundbreaking horror classic. But here’s the thing about these movies: they’re not half bad. There’s no denying that the vast majority of sequels are both unnecessary and terrible, less continuations of stories or honest entertainments than filmed deals. But it’s also unfair to paint all follow-ups with that broad brush; there are a fair number of sequels that are far better than their reputations would have you …Read More

Wild Vintage Posters from Classic Roger Corman Drive-In Movies

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Chris Nashawaty’s wonderful new book Crab Monsters, Teenage Cavemen, and Candy Stripe Nurses is an homage to the “King of the B Movie”: Roger Corman, whose cheapo productions for American International Pictures and his own New World outfit, aimed squarely at drive-in and grindhouses, provided not only thrills for movie-goers but opportunities for countless young filmmakers looking for their first break. Nashawaty’s book (out now) is an affectionate tribute to the producer/director, an oral history with contributions by Corman and the many actors, directors, and technicians he employed. But it’s also a handsome coffee-table volume showcasing the distinctive art of these textbook exploitation movies, in which the marketing campaign was often devised before the script was even written. After the jump, we’ve selected ten of our favorite vintage Corman posters, accompanied by explanatory captions from the book.
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