Gael Garcia Bernal

‘Mozart in the Jungle': Come for Gael García Bernal, Stay for What Might Become Amazon’s Next Great Series

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During Amazon Studios’ second pilot season, there were two clear winners. The first was Transparent, a poignant series that was brilliant and darkly funny from the very first preview episode. The second was Mozart in the Jungle, with its beautiful settings and talented ensemble cast. Its success was a little harder to predict than Transparent‘s: We knew where Transparent could go, but had no idea where Mozart was headed. Yet it was such a refreshingly unique show — and one that could help establish Amazon Studios’ brand as a “network” dedicated to more offbeat programming — that it left everyone wanting more. Tomorrow night, ten months after the pilot premiered, the full series will be made available for streaming. It may not live up to the high standard that Transparent set for Amazon, but it certainly does its best to compete.
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Jon Stewart’s ‘Rosewater’ Isn’t as Smart as Its Director

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Jon Stewart is, by all accounts, a smart guy. In interviews, he comes across as not just funny, but also thoughtful, articulate, and insightful. He co-wrote two astute and breathlessly funny books with his Daily Show staff, and before that, an even better collection of witty short pieces that rivals the best of Woody Allen and S.J. Perlman. And he hosts one of the savviest and most reliably brainy satires in television history, a show which, to a great extent, established the model of using both humor and context to create “explainer” commentary (a style extended by everyone from Rachel Maddow to Stewart’s former colleague John Oliver). And though such commentary often explicates and educates, we rarely get the sense that Stewart is talking down to us — which is why it’s such a disappointment that Rosewater, his debut film as a writer/director, is so often pitched and played like a carefully dumbed-down TV movie.
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How Does ‘Y Tu Mamá También’ Fit Into Alfonso Cuarón’s Idiosyncratic Career?

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You’re not exactly dancing out on a limb these days if you suggest Alfonso Cuarón all but saved the Harry Potter film franchise when he took over for Chris Columbus with The Prisoner of Azkaban. But there was a bit of an uproar among concerned parents and cultural watchdogs when he was first attached to the project, for one reason and one reason only: his previous film, and biggest success to date, was the road movie Y Tu Mamá También, rated NC-17 for its drug use and “strong sexual content.” Fears of Cuarón crafting scenes of Harry, Hermione, and Ron toking up and having a three-way were ultimately for naught, and Azkaban’s success would propel Cuarón to the upper ranks of the mainstream. But Y Tu Mamá También (out today in a lovely new DVD/Blu-ray special edition from the Criterion Collection) remains his most fascinating work — and, increasingly, an outlier in his idiosyncratic filmography.
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Flavorwire’s Guide to Movies You Need to Stream This Week

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Welcome to Flavorwire’s streaming movie guide, in which we help you sift through the scores of movies streaming on Netflix, Hulu, and other services to find the best of the recently available, freshly relevant, or soon to expire. This week’s new releases are universally underwhelming (you may be tempted to watch Scream 4, but in the name of all that is Craven, resist that temptation), but we got a look at the titles expiring over the next couple of weeks and were amazed by how many great movies are disappearing — so the theme of this week’s streaming movie guide is, apparently, Watch Them While You Can. Join us after the jump for great stuff from Philip Seymour Hoffman, Billy Bob Thornton, Frances McDormand, Ethan Hawke, Robert De Niro, Gael García Bernal, Diego Luna, James Gandolfini, Marisa Tomei, the Coen Brothers, Mel Brooks, Sidney Lumet, Robert Altman, and Alfonso Cuarón, and follow the title links to watch them right now.
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10 Bizarre Political Ads We Can’t Believe Are Real

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Chile’s first shot at Oscar gold comes in the form of a comedy-drama that revisits the marketing campaign that helped oust Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet in 1988. Directed by Pablo Larrain, No stars Mexican heartthrob Gael Garcia Bernal as René, a hotshot ad guy enlisted by the opposition to spearhead the “No” (that is, anti-Pinochet) campaign. Employing rainbows, imagery you’d find in 1980s Pepsi commercials, and the tagline “Chile, happiness is on its way,” the opposition’s ridiculously lightweight messaging appears to convince the country’s majority that “no” is the way to go.
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