Illustration

‘Was She Pretty?’: An Excerpt From Leanne Shapton’s Classic Graphic Novel on Modern Love

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Originally published ten years ago, Leanne Shapton’s Was She Pretty?, a “graphic-novel-cum-children’s-book” (Publisher’s Weekly) about modern love, was inspired, the author says, by “raging jealousy.” The reader can tell, even through the book’s veneer of timeless, cosmopolitan art and elegant (if unadorned) prose. Do you remember your ex-lovers? How would you describe them in a sentence? How would you draw them? To celebrate the book’s anniversary, and perhaps to cool a few jealousies, here are five reminders of your romantic past, reprinted with the permission of publisher Drawn & Quarterly.
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Character-Filled Portraits of Famous Comedians

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Sketched Comedy is a series of portraits of famous comedians by Cleveland artist and gallery owner Alex Kelly (which we first spotted on AV Club). He started the project in 2013, illustrating the mugs of comedians, actors, writers, podcasters, and others on a daily basis. Kelly pays homage to everyone from Sasheer Zamata and Michael Che of Saturday Night Live, to vets like Bobcat Goldthwait and George Carlin. His style is full of texture and fantastic linework, and he really captures the character of each comedian. Kelly updates his Instagram regularly and also has work for sale if you’ve been looking for a portrait of your favorite funny person. See more in our gallery.
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Ghoulish 19th-Century European Posters About the Dark Side of Life

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The Century Guild Gallery in Culver City, California specializes in international Art Nouveau and Symbolist works, namely lithographs, created during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele, Alphonse Mucha, and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec are just a few of the famous names you’ve probably heard before. The gallery also has an appreciation for the silent film era/German cabaret, including directors like Fritz Lang — who created the most expensive movie of his time, 1927’s Metropolis. Dangerous Minds recently shared a selection of ghoulish posters from the gallery’s collection that are being sold as Patronage Prints.
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The Best Designs from the Underground Film Poster Movement

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The alternative film poster phenomenon started with small companies like Austin’s Mondo. It’s since grown into an underground movement. Artists like Gary Pullin, Tracie Ching, Randy Ortiz, and Dave Perillo are just a few of the creators challenging the Hollywood market with fan-favorite designs that speak to the genre-savvy and classic movie lovers.
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Adorable Illustrations of a Cat’s Everyday Life

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Earlier this week, Thistle Magazine introduced us to an artist by the name of Julia d. whose adorable cat illustrations spoke to the feline fiends at Flavorwire HQ. A delightfully plump ginger pussycat is the subject of the artist’s fascination. She depicts the curious kitty in everyday situations — napping, rolling around, and begging for attention (only to sashay on by, we imagine). Cat lovers know what we’re talking about. See more of the artist’s “dreamy” ode to a kitty in our gallery.
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50 Darkly Beautiful Horror Film Posters

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A film poster can make or break a movie for discerning audiences before it even hits the theater. In the case of horror cinema, cheap thrills and jump scares are often pushed into the marketing spotlight. But there’s a unique visual history when it comes to horror films and their posters that is incredibly diverse and, on occasion, stunningly beautiful. In the spirit of the spooky season, here are the posters that captured our imaginations with amazing artwork and creative designs.
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Clever Illustrations of Horror Film Baddies as IKEA Instruction Manual Pictographs

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The Halloween season has arrived, and it’s the most wonderful time of the year. Instead of trotting out the same old spookiness, artist Ed Harrington is kicking it Swedish-style. His illustrations of horror film villains as IKEA instruction manual pictographs are a unique twist on the genre. As Dangerous Minds points out, if you’ve ever put together a piece of IKEA furniture, then you know things can get really scary, really fast.
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Terrifying 1906 Illustrations of H. G. Wells’ ‘The War of the Worlds’

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Brazilian artist Henrique Alvim Corrêa’s career was cut short when he died at only 34 years old. But the illustrator left behind a small science-fiction legacy thanks to his 1906 artworks detailing the Martian invasion of London in H. G. Wells’ novel The War of the Worlds. Wells’ tale preyed upon turn-of-the-century fears about the apocalypse and other Victorian superstitions (and social prejudices) regarding the unknown. Corrêa’s fantastical, murky style is fitting of Wells’ dark themes. The Martian fighting machines resemble frightening legions of massive spiders. There were only 500 copies of the Belgian edition of Welles’ story with Corrêa’s artworks, which we spotted on website Monster Brains (run by illustrator Aeron Alfrey), but you can see some of the images in our …Read More