Illustration

Terrifying 1906 Illustrations of H. G. Wells’ ‘The War of the Worlds’

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Brazilian artist Henrique Alvim Corrêa’s career was cut short when he died at only 34 years old. But the illustrator left behind a small science-fiction legacy thanks to his 1906 artworks detailing the Martian invasion of London in H. G. Wells’ novel The War of the Worlds. Wells’ tale preyed upon turn-of-the-century fears about the apocalypse and other Victorian superstitions (and social prejudices) regarding the unknown. Corrêa’s fantastical, murky style is fitting of Wells’ dark themes. The Martian fighting machines resemble frightening legions of massive spiders. There were only 500 copies of the Belgian edition of Welles’ story with Corrêa’s artworks, which we spotted on website Monster Brains (run by illustrator Aeron Alfrey), but you can see some of the images in our …Read More

An Adorable Illustrated Tribute to Wes Anderson’s Quirky Characters

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We haven’t met a Wes Anderson tribute we could refuse. Colombian artist Alejandro Giraldo, who we learned about on Boing Boing, hit our sweet spot with his illustrated ode to the quirky characters of filmmaker Wes Anderson. From The Royal Tenenbaums to The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou, Giraldo’s adorable artworks remind us of all the things we love about Anderson’s fictional universe — right down to the itty-bitty details, such as Agatha’s Mexico-shaped birthmark and milkmaid braids in The Grand Budapest Hotel. See how Giraldo captured Anderson’s charming aesthetic, below.
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Inspiring Illustrations of Awesome Female Scientists

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Recently, the frustrations of women everywhere regarding toymakers who create girl and boy-specific playthings (in shades of pink or blue, of course) were voiced in a viral ad created by company GoldieBlox — which designs toys to develop interest in engineering, math, and science. In their video “Girls,” which riffed on the famous Beastie Boys song, they demanded a range of toys for girls interested in typically “boy” things. And remember that misstep by Mattel with their computer engineer Barbie? The doll had the right props, but the accompanying book had some issues. Thankfully there are companies like Lego, which creates a few female science-based minifigs.
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10 Science Fiction Illustrators You Should Know

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We’ve been big fans of Swedish illustrator, animator, and graphic designer Kilian Eng for some time. Eng’s science fiction-inspired artworks are architectural, elegant, and punctuated with electrifying colors. They also channel the iconic illustrators from the past — especially French legend Moebius. It’s no wonder the artist’s monograph Object 5 has been out of print, but publisher Floating World Comics has reissued the book as a European album hardcover with 16 new pages of art. Eng’s style has us nostalgic for some of the sci-fi illustration greats we love. Here are ten you should know.
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Beautiful Illustrations That Reimagine the Brothers Grimm Fairy Tales

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In 1812, brothers Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm published 86 dark stories that became known as the Grimms’ Fairy Tales. The book was presented as children’s literature, but the violent, sexual, and sinister narratives within painted a very different picture. In celebration of older brother Jacob Grimm’s birthday this week, we’re looking at beautifully illustrated retellings of the Grimms’ fairy tales by artists new and old. These stunning artworks prove that the Grimms continue to capture our imagination and curiosity more than 200 years later.
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Creative 2015 Calendars to Inspire You in the New Year

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Another new year, another new calendar — because nothing makes us feel the trembling of our mortality more than tracking time each and every day. If you’re like us, sometimes a digital calendar just won’t cut it. Enjoy putting pen to paper and watching the days flip by? Pick up one of these beautifully designed 2015 calendars that are sure to get your creative juices …Read More

Mega Minimalist Movie Posters: Can You Guess the Films?

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Great design stands the test of time. In the case of these iconic film posters, abstracted by London-based designer and art director John Taylor, the images are resilient enough to remain recognizable even when given the minimalist treatment. Taylor’s Film the Blanks series, which we first learned about on Co.Design, remixes cinema’s most famous one-sheets down to their core elements. He posts the images on his website and encourages readers to participate in a guessing game. “Filmtheblanks.com evolved from a personal project into a daily global quiz and jumped from computer screen to silkscreen as a series of limited edition prints,” Taylor writes. So for contemporary film poster fans who prefer Taylor’s stripped down versions instead of the originals, he has various ephemera available for sale on his website. In the spirit of Taylor’s quiz, we’ve featured ten of his designs past the break—with the titles blacked out (highlight or double-click to view).
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25 Vintage, International Book Covers for H. G. Wells’ ‘The War of the Worlds’

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Happy birthday to English author H. G. Wells, one of the fathers of science fiction. His 1898 novel The War of the Worlds, about a devastating alien invasion on Earth, has been published continuously for over 100 years. Orson Welles resurrected the frightening story for his 1938 radio broadcast, narrated by the director as a news bulletin, which led to widespread panic as listeners thought the Martian invasion was real. The War of the Worlds has been adapted dozens of times, most popularly by Steven Spielberg in a 2005 film starring Tom Cruise. But the book itself lives on in the imaginations of readers everywhere. After spotting a stunning collection of War of the Worlds book covers, we selected several vintage covers that span the globe. These images represent the influence of Wells’ story throughout the decades and demonstrate how different countries absorbed the intense, interplanetary tale into the collective consciousness.
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Pop Culture-Inspired Photos of an Adorable Dog in Illustrated Scenes

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Adorable, Budweiser-loving bull terrier Spuds MacKenzie was the most famous dog of the 1980s, but the most popular bull terrier of 2014 is a pup named Jimmy Choo. The photogenic pooch, who we learned of on Photojojo resides with his human Rafael Mantesso—a Brazilian restaurateur and marketing exec. Mantesso also happens to be a talented artist. His illustrations adorn the backgrounds of his fun photos of Jimmy. We’re especially fond of the pop culture-inspired pics, including an homage to performance artist Marina Abramović (in this case, “Marina Abramobull”), Disney’s Lady and the Tramp, and Game of Thrones. Get to know darling dog Jimmy Choo in our gallery.
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Fantastic Album Covers Illustrated by Kids

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There’s something endlessly charming and fascinating about seeing the world through a child’s eyes, especially when it comes to all things pop culture. Ah, their uncorrupt hearts. Artist Jon F. Allen tipped us off to this fun Tumblr of album cover art by kids. While the submissions seem to have slowed to a crawl, we couldn’t resist the magic of these marker and crayon versions of music’s finest. Energetic scribbles, stick people, and bright colors make everything better.
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