Illustration

Disney Princesses as Raucous Roller Derby Girls

Fans of Disney Princess mashups, this one’s for you. We’ve seen artists subvert the iconic (stereotypical) feminine trope in a number of ways, often empowering the girly Mouse House figures. That’s where Amanda Robinson’s re-imagination comes in (first spotted on The Mary Sue). She’s taken Disney royalty out of their regal gowns and outfitted them in roller derby outfits — all the women now ready to rumble. Perhaps the best part of the project is the names of each princess, reinventing their personas. “Mulan Rude,” Ne’er Do Belle,” and “Poca Face” are a few of our favorites. See what you think of this newest Disney Princess remix in our gallery. … Read More

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20 Things You Didn’t Know About Dr. Seuss

A wizard of the written word, today marks the 110th birthday of Theodor Geisel — better known as the dear Dr. Seuss. The beloved children’s author and illustrator created a menagerie of creatures that recited anapestic tetrameter, caused trouble, and captured our imaginations. The man behind beasties like the Grinch, Lorax, and Sneetches was a fascinating character in his own right. Here are 20 facts about the great Dr. you might have missed. … Read More

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Valentine’s Day-Worthy Art Inspired by the Talking Heads

The fine folks at Land gallery in Portland are celebrating Valentine’s Day with some arty odes to love, inspired by the Talking Heads. If oversized business suits and avant-garde theatrics make your heart swell, the exhibition Love for Sale will call to you. From the Johnny Marr-backed “(Nothing But) Flowers” to the songs from David Byrne’s 1986 film True Stories, directed by the performer, these valentines reference all the greats from the band. Catch a preview of the show in our gallery, then head to the official website for more information. … Read More

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Charming Illustrations of HBO’s ‘Girls’

Season three of HBO’s Girls is right around the corner, set to premiere on January 12. London-based artist Nina Cosford has been illustrating the series from across the pond. “I love the show’s wittiness and its painfully relatable scenarios and character traits and wanted to use my style of illustration to highlight these nuances,” she told the Daily Dot. “I think it helps to accentuate the softer, more charming elements of the show which lie beneath the grittiness of it all.” Cosford’s artworks highlight some of the show’s memorable moments (and quotes) with refreshing simplicity. We’re especially in love with Cosford’s illustration of the “Maiden’s Milk Vintage Boutique” stoop sale. Take a closer look, below. … Read More

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The Secret World of Fore-Edge Book Paintings

There’s nothing we love more than an old, handsomely bound book. Much to our delight, the University of Iowa recently published a series of photographs detailing a four-volume set of scientific books from 1837. They contain secret artworks, known as fore-edge paintings, hidden along the edges of the pages. It’s a whimsical art form that dates back to the 16th century, when Italian artist Cesare Vecellio (cousin of Renaissance painter Titian) started using his books as a canvas in order to beautify them. As the artistry of edge paintings developed, they became more complex and fanciful, the painted scenes visible only when the pages were fanned. In some cases, a different image would appear when fanned back to front and front to back. We went searching for other examples of this beautiful art form, which is being kept alive by a select few today. … Read More

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Amazing 19th-Century Illustrations of ‘The Divine Comedy’

Dante Alighieri’s The Divine Comedy holds an important place in the pantheon of world literature. Countless artists have been inspired by Dante’s allegorical, visionary work, which describes the Italian poet’s journey through hell, purgatory, and heaven.

Perhaps the best-known artist to adapt Dante’s unearthly tale was Gustave Doré, whose gorgeous folio was published in 1861. Jean-Édouard Dargent (aka Yan’ Dargent) was a rival of Doré’s and also published a book of illustrations (in 1870) detailing Dante’s epic poem. Where Doré’s work featured polished, classical nudes and exquisite line work, Dargent’s felt more primitive, violent, and a little rough around the edges. Blog Monster Brains published Dargent’s prints from the Divine Comedy series, which we feature in our gallery. The details are incredible. … Read More

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10 Fascinating Interviews with Maurice Sendak

Maurice Sendak, literature’s deeply passionate curmudgeon, whose grumpiness was matched by a warm and tender spirit, left a “wild” legacy of best-selling books, beautiful illustrations, and words that forever touched his readers, young and old. The author’s birthday is tomorrow. We wanted to celebrate Sendak’s life by revisiting some of his greatest and most fascinating interviews. His candidness, sincerity, and humor will never be forgotten. … Read More

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Whimsical Illustrations of Rooms Composed With Words

Thomas Broomé, a Swedish artist we learned about on Fubiz, creates illustrations of rooms composed entirely of words. The artist doesn’t randomly assign words to objects; he defines the objects themselves with text. The word “wall” repeats across the walls of rooms and becomes increasingly distorted with the changing perspective. Words, letters, and lines become patterns and form. Give the artist’s whimsical rooms a read in our gallery. … Read More

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Cheeky Comic Book-Style Illustrations of Teenage Girl Gangs

Comic creator and artist Hellen Jo, whose work we first enjoyed on Booooooom, illustrates the dramatic, tragic, and thrilling lives of young women. As she put it in an interview with Vice, her work is about “the dangers of underestimating teenage girls. Fear them!” Growing up in a Christian Korean home in the suburbs, Jo said that her biggest coming-of-age moments felt utterly mundane. The wild gang of girls she illustrates represent a romanticized vision of those years. Although they’re rendered in a cute comic book style, Jo’s girl pals carry knives and aren’t afraid to fight. … Read More

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Little Girls Are Better at Designing Superheroes Than You

In Alex Law’s awesome new project/Tumblr, Little Girls Are Better at Designing Superheroes Than You, which we spotted over at The Rumpus, the undergrad biology student/artist (!) takes pictures of little girls dressed up like superheroes and turns them into awesome drawings. Law writes: “Kids are more impressionable than you, but kids can also be less restricted by cultural gender norms than you. Kids are more creative than you, and they’re better at making superheroes than you.” Fair enough. Check out some kick-ass little girls and their superheroine counterparts after the jump, and then head here to see more of Law’s work. … Read More

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