India

Striking Photos of India’s Old Movie Theaters

By

India is the largest producer of films in the world, but its economic growth has forced some of the country’s smaller, single-screen theaters into decline. Katherine Newbegin, who we first learned about on Beautiful/Decay, started photographing these lost movie palaces in 2010, documenting a once thriving social chapter in Indian cinema’s history. “The fulcrum of the project lies in the exploration of the architecture, which is informed by the human relationships that took place in these spaces, but now only remain in the evidence left behind,” she told ArtStar. “The cinema architecture holds a stifling sense of deadness, as if it were a museum. The lingering chairs, ancient posters, and well-worn furniture act as a conduit into a displaced time.” This process of discovery is crucial to Newbegin’s work. She travels alone to each location, usually discovered by word of mouth, without any knowledge of the theater’s history. For instance, she didn’t learn that the Samrat Cinema I in Jaipur was a porn theater until after photographing the space. See the crumbling beauty of India’s cinemas through Newbegin’s eyes in our gallery.
…Read More

Fascinating Photographs of India’s Disappearing Professions

By

If you’ve ever spent any time in India, you’ll know that one of the myriad fascinating aspects of the country is that so many trades that have been automated in the west are still done by hand on the subcontinent. NYC-based photographer Supranav Dash has documented many of these occupations in his new series Marginal Trades, which we spotted via PetaPixel. With India’s rapidly modernizing economy putting many of these trades under threat, Dash’s portraits serve as a record of a disappearing world, as well as beautiful examples of the art form in general. Check out more of Dash’s work at his website.
…Read More

Photos of India's Garish, Expressive Truck Culture

By

Brooklyn photographer Dan Eckstein captured India’s truck driving culture during two trips through Rajasthan, Punjab, and Haryana. He describes the garish decorations that fill the rigs as a unique form of folk art, sporting glittering, tassel-filled markers that express everything from caste, religion, and Bollywood film favorites. His series, Horn Please, takes its name from the signs plastered across the back of most trucks in India — “a place where lanes are a mere suggestion, side-view mirrors are seldom used and modes of transport range from horse-drawn carts to eighteen-wheel trucks.” Grant Truck Road stretches from Afghanistan to Bangladesh and has become a fascinating hub of roadside culture. Enter the decorated domain of India’s truck drivers in our gallery.
…Read More