Jean-Luc Godard

The Films of French New Wave Icon Jacques Rivette You Can Watch Right Now

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François Truffaut once called French New Wave filmmaker Jacques Rivette “the most fanatic of all of our band of fanatics.” Although he never received the spotlight of someone like Jean-Luc Godard, Rivette made headlines just last year after his twelve-hour opus Out 1 played in theaters for the first time, newly restored. The visionary filmmaker passed away earlier this week, leaving behind a legacy that historians and critics are still challenged by, thanks to Rivette’s impossible-to-define approach that blended theater, cinema, and a discourse perhaps more familiar to philosophers and art critics. Here are the Rivette films you can stream right now in honor of the legendary director.
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20 Iconic Fashion Moments in French New Wave Cinema

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French New Wave fashion has never gone out of style. Rodarte’s Laura Mulleavy has dubbed Jean Seberg’s Herald Tribune tee in Breathless “[the shirt] which everyone that I’ve ever known has always wanted.” Anna Karina’s sophisticated cat-eye is still enviable more than 50 years later. And it’s impossible to see Breton stripes without thinking of the Nouvelle Vague. The style icons of French New Wave cinema made outerwear cool, gave a wide headband the chic edge it was missing, and proved menswear often looked better on women.
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Godard’s Best Picture Win: When a Critics Group Dares to Break With Critical Consensus

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Over the weekend, the National Society of Film Critics — a distinguished organization including some of the most widely respected movie scribes in the game — met in New York to make selections for their 2014 awards. (Side note: hats off to the group for waiting until 2014 was actually over to recognize its films.) They don’t nominate, and they don’t have a fancy dinner; they just get together, argue about the movies, cast votes via a weighted ballot system, and that’s that. And this year, their Best Picture selection was Jean-Luc Godard’s Goodbye to Language. They didn’t choose Boyhood, like most of the other critics’ groups, or any of the rest of the Oscar faves. And, accordingly, the Oscar Watchers™ lost their damn minds.
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Flavorwire Staffers’ Favorite Films of 2014

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Our film editor Jason Bailey already posted his list of the best films of 2014, but, as year-end qualifiers are oh-so-subjective, and as everyone loves the opportunity to gush on occasion, we wanted to give each of our staffers the chance to laud and list their personal favorite 2014 film. With no restrictions on repetition, as the votes started to trickle in, we began to notice something of an Obvious pattern:
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The 10 Best International Films of 2014

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In surveying some of the best foreign-language films of the year, it’s become clear that many have common themes. Some are about the primacy of family and crises in masculinity, while others center on rehabilitating the past and finding spiritual meaning in the secular world. But all of these films follow characters whose basic needs — familial and romantic stability, sexual fulfillment, and creative expression — question just how progressive modern society really is. Here are ten essential international films from the past …Read More

Cinema’s Talking Animal Ids, Ranked

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“There are elements of Goodbye to Language you might find in any Hollywood movie — people arguing, a shootout — and even a dog, the director’s own. (Roxy wanders the countryside [“conversing”] with the lake and the river that want to tell him what humans never hear.)” writes NPR of Jean-Luc Godard’s new film. The director’s “meditation on love and history, nature and meaning” will be playing at New York’s IFC Center until November 4.

“One of the reasons the dog Roxy is very prominent in the film … is that he’s trying to get people to look at the world in a kind of an unspoiled way,” critic David Bordwell stated of Godard’s animal companion. ”There are hints throughout the film that animal consciousness is kind of closer to the world than we are, that language sets up a barrier or filter or screen between us and what’s really there. And although the film is full of language, talk, printed text and so on, nevertheless I think there’s a sense he wants the viewer to scrape away a lot of the ordinary conceptions we have about how we communicate and look at the world afresh.”

Animal-centric films tend to fall into the absurd or terrible categories, especially those where the beasts talk or act as a foil for a human character’s inner world. But Godard’s latest demonstrates one way directors can make the concept of the animal id work. Here are eight others, ranked for your convenience.
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The 35 Best Books by Cinema’s Greatest Auteurs

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It’s an old standby that if a person is truly a master at one thing, he’s probably not great at much else. But when it comes to cinema, the auteur’s role is to be good at everything — sound, writing, camerawork, etc. — while also maintaining an overarching vision. So it isn’t surprising that there are so many great books written by cinema’s most famous (and infamous) …Read More

100 Famous Directors’ Rules of Filmmaking

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Artistic expression is an assertion of individuality, and all artists compose their work differently. In the case of filmmaking, there are numerous approaches to translating a story to celluloid. Inspired by director Wim Wenders’ recent advertising short, “Wim Wenders’ Rules for Cinema Perfection,” we’ve collected the golden rules of filmmaking employed by 100 famous directors. These tips and tricks are a wonderful source of advice and inspiration — even for the most seasoned professionals. The rules also serve as a fascinating snapshot of each directors’ filmography, capturing the spirit of their …Read More